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Author Topic: User CP Replies on this forum?  (Read 5848 times)
GRANDKODIAK
Member

Posts: 85




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« on: May 23, 2012, 12:44:28 PM »

I've been looking but can't seem to find it. Is there a User CP Replies page anywhere for this forum? It would make life alot easier here!
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Tech/General

no base station yet

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K9YLI
Member

Posts: 859




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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2012, 07:35:09 AM »

Explain   " user CP replies"

what is  CP???

lay it out in english......
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2544




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« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2012, 09:45:16 PM »

I'll bite too. What is a CP reply?

Actually I see the term used in Google. But I can't figure out what it means.
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W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1044




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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2012, 07:21:20 AM »

I, too, am at a loss. CP means "control panel"? Or, are you thinking something like a "confidential-private" reply?

A good rule-of-thumb, for everyone, is to define an acronym or initialization in its first use, then use it alone in later references. (Does LOL mean "laugh out loud" or "lots of love" or something entirely different? We can't know for sure unless it's defined.

BTW (e.g. by the way), you should identify yourself either as a General (which you are in the Call Search data base) or a Technician, but not both.

GL in finding your answer (GL, as sent in CW means "good luck," and CW means "continuous wave," the method used to send Morse code. (CW as "Country & Western is a whole 'nother topic).

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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3748




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« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2012, 07:45:14 AM »

FYI:  Do you forsee a time when people will talk completely with acronyms?   Wink
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




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« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2012, 07:59:52 AM »

FYI:  Do you forsee a time when people will talk completely with acronyms?   Wink

We are already there. 

Back when the techonoliges available for communication were still basically in infancy, the *ability* to communicate and the reasons for establishing clear communication was not the issue. 

Today there are many ways to establish the technical communication, yet it seems that the people have lost the will to even attempt to have something worthwhile to communicate, nor the desire or respect for the other party to even take the time and effort to actually make their communication as clearly and concisely as would be desirable. 

Such as this relegates the art of communication to the trash heap of history and is surely yet another sign of civilization failing IMO. 

73
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W5FYI
Member

Posts: 1044




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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2012, 08:13:46 AM »

Quote
FYI:  Do you foresee a time when people will talk completely with acronyms?

I once had a doctor explain that he was asked by a patient, "What can I do about my IBS?"

The doctor said "I really can't tell until I have results from a CBA test, with pHi results, and a D2BL with an ILS panel.

The patient asked "I'm sorry, but what does all that mean?"

The doctor replied, "I don't know. What do you mean by 'IBS?"
« Last Edit: May 25, 2012, 10:02:24 AM by W5FYI » Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2544




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« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2012, 08:30:29 AM »

"clear communication was not the issue."

Don't you mean, not the problem?

I sorta collect substitutions of "issue" for "problem" or other more appropriate words.  It's as if we don't want to admit anymore that we or others have problems. The record I've found is held by a news commentator who referred to the Japanese tsunami and nuclear disaster (15,000+ dead)  as an "issue."

Notice how many on Eham with a broken radio report that it has an issue.

« Last Edit: May 25, 2012, 09:04:27 AM by K0OD » Logged
W0FM
Member

Posts: 2054




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« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2012, 01:25:28 PM »

When I just Googled "CP" I got references to "Club Penguin" (I have NO idea) and a woman suffering with Cerebral Palsey who coughs a lot when she eats.

Troll?

Terry, WØFM
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5694




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« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2012, 03:27:36 PM »

"clear communication was not the issue."

Don't you mean, not the problem?

I sorta collect substitutions of "issue" for "problem" or other more appropriate words.  It's as if we don't want to admit anymore that we or others have problems. The record I've found is held by a news commentator who referred to the Japanese tsunami and nuclear disaster (15,000+ dead)  as an "issue."

Notice how many on Eham with a broken radio report that it has an issue.



And you are correct about that. 

Dunno why I used that damn word, its use is one of my own pet peeves as well. 

The bad use of the language is having a creeping effect that in itself is rather scary...


Thanks for catching that! 

Um, can I blame it on that strong cup o' Kona coffee? 


73
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K0OD
Member

Posts: 2544




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« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2012, 05:28:10 PM »

Clark, this is another case where the bad guys have won. (I saw that posted on a grammar site). Eham seems especially to have surrendered the good fight which is odd since this site is largely about solving problems. A busted $5000 radio is a problem, not a issue. Touching the plate cap of an energized 3-500 is a big problem, not an issue. But some dictionaries now show issue as a limp-wristed synonym for problem. It's becoming standard English.

Problem --a perfectly good word--has been largely replaced by the fuzzier word issue and in just 20 years according to some language experts. 

Correctly used, issue means a topic for discussion as in "The candidate debated the issues." Somehow issue came to mean a minor problem or inconvenience. But lately problem and a number of similar words have been subsumed into the euphemism, issue. That word is like a horror film Blob.... evolving, growing and propelled in all directions by some need in us to soften everything unpleasant. Perhaps it's a process one picks up from too much Dr. Phil.  Smiley

If the death of 15,000 Japanese can be called an issue, what remains that deserves to be called a problem, a catastrophe? Nuclear Armageddon?

Houston We Have an Issue?
Note this famous example of good clear English when it mattered:
  Swigert: 'Okay, Houston, we've had a problem here.'
  Houston: 'This is Houston. Say again please.'
  Lovell: 'Houston, we've had a problem. We've had a main B bus undervolt."
   
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STAYVERTICAL
Member

Posts: 859




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« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2012, 08:45:19 PM »

Historically, and still today, language is used to differentiate people into different class structures.
This is why the ancient nobility would spend so much time on learning dead languages and have training in grammar.
It was not possible for the average person to spend so much time wastefully, and it was a way for the upper class to recognise each other.
Today, although we won't admit it, language is still used as a tag.
For example, as soon as I hear someone say the word "disrespecting" I know that person has had substandard language training.
It may not be politically correct, but it is still true that we judge a person by the way they speak.

For most of human history, the powerful have to show that they are so rich that they can afford to waste money and time on
activities which are not productive.

Examples are the elaborate tapesteries produced by the wives of nobles, showing these men could afford to have a wife who
did not have to produce food in the fields.
Another example is the elaborately outfitted footmen and servants employed, showing that these people were so rich that they
could have people who could do nothing else but wait to open doors or wait for their master to ask for something.
Objects of art, such as paintings and sculptures, although beautiful in their own right, were also purchased to show that money
could be used for objects which did not involve mere survival.
And of course, something that has endured till today, is the keeping of the frail and weak wife, who is unfit for robust agricultural work.

With the demise of the nobility in most western countries, the people with money were the businessmen.
These business people tried to emulate the nobility of old, but they need to earn a living, something which the old nobility would never do.
So they needed to find other ways to display the ability to waste money.
In modern days, the wealthy businessman has his wife waste money prolifically, thus increasing the status of her husband who is too busy earning a living.

These are all efforts to show show ones increased status, such as the changing styles in suntanning.
For example in agrarian times, a european person who was very pale was obviously someone who did not have to work in the fields,
and so must have had more money and status.
So the style was for pale skin in Europe and many other countries.

These days, with many people working in offices, and so not being suntanned, the reverse is true.
To show that one is rich enough to spend time in sunny climates, many europeans try to get suntans or artifically darken their skin.
The opposite is true in many developing countries where the majority of people work outside.

So from the way you speak, to your tanning preferences, or the reason people pay large prices for garments advertising their makers,
the game is the same - status seeking.

We will all deny it, but that is the baseline of many of our decisions.

Just an observation, please don't think I am "disrespecting" anyone.

73 - Rob


« Last Edit: May 25, 2012, 09:08:20 PM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2544




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« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2012, 08:35:35 AM »

From 2011, 15,000 die in Japanese weather "issue."

Now consider today's headline from the LA Times: "Confessor in Etan Patz killing has mental health issues."

"A man who claims to have abducted and strangled Etan Patz, who vanished 33 years ago Friday, has suffered from bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and hallucinations,...".

At least he doesn't have mental health problems.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3748




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« Reply #13 on: May 26, 2012, 09:22:08 AM »

Seems that several here have issues with problems or problems with issues!
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KA5IPF
Member

Posts: 993


WWW

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« Reply #14 on: May 26, 2012, 09:56:56 AM »

I still don't know what "CP" is?

Clif
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