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Author Topic: PLUG-IN Appliance Hams  (Read 14703 times)
KE4DRN
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Posts: 3729




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« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2012, 05:34:01 PM »

Home Depot has the Pass & Seymour
20 Amp 250-Volt Plug NEMA 6-20P $10
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W2MV
Member

Posts: 207




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« Reply #31 on: June 06, 2012, 11:28:26 AM »

Given that the plug/outlet are not common and the specific NEMA types may vary from shack to shack (hey, I installed the big 50A 240VAC outlet- way overkill) I would give RF Concepts some slack in this area.
The price, however, does seem high.

BTW, I do have several neighbors who appear to be able-bodied, but they have chosen to pay someone else to mow their very small back yards ever since they moved in.
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3729




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« Reply #32 on: June 06, 2012, 02:38:14 PM »

Guess the five or six feet of #12 SJ or SO cord
makes up for some of the asking price.

73 james
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N2RJ
Member

Posts: 1204




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« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2012, 08:49:40 AM »

Quote from: kf7cg
Ranges and Cloths dryers don't come with power cords either. One must buy the "pigtail" separately.
1996 National Electrical Code (NEC) Section 250-60 change.



This is the grounding requirement, correct?

It makes sense to sell the cord set separately since there are a lot of homes still with 3 wire ungrounded receptacles. My home has one... but I don't use an electric dryer (gas is MUCH better!) If I have to use an electric dryer I'll likely just update the receptacle to a 4 wire one with ground. The wiring is already there, ground, neutral and all.
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W1QJ
Member

Posts: 1458




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« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2012, 09:02:08 AM »

Quote from: kf7cg
Ranges and Cloths dryers don't come with power cords either. One must buy the "pigtail" separately.
1996 National Electrical Code (NEC) Section 250-60 change.



This is the grounding requirement, correct?

It makes sense to sell the cord set separately since there are a lot of homes still with 3 wire ungrounded receptacles. My home has one... but I don't use an electric dryer (gas is MUCH better!) If I have to use an electric dryer I'll likely just update the receptacle to a 4 wire one with ground. The wiring is already there, ground, neutral and all.

Maybe or maybe not, houses built in the 60's may not have the neutral wire.  Often times they used 2 wires and a ground, so you could not hook up a 4 prong plug to that.  To use a 4 prong plug you would need 3 insulated wires and a ground. 
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N2RJ
Member

Posts: 1204




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« Reply #35 on: June 11, 2012, 01:11:29 PM »

Maybe or maybe not, houses built in the 60's may not have the neutral wire.  Often times they used 2 wires and a ground, so you could not hook up a 4 prong plug to that.  To use a 4 prong plug you would need 3 insulated wires and a ground. 

My house was built in the 90s. It has an insulated (white) neutral.
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KG4NEL
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Posts: 373




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« Reply #36 on: June 11, 2012, 01:20:25 PM »

So what the hell is the difference between this and CB?  Something isn't right here.

Ham radio is what you make of it. For some, it's building things. For others, yes, it's just talking.

Who's to say what isn't ham radio or not?  Huh
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KASSY
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Posts: 166




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« Reply #37 on: June 15, 2012, 12:55:05 PM »

For my car, oil is only $2 (10W-30) a quart and it requires 3.8 quarts.  Filters are $2.95 each from the dealer if I buy 6 at a time.  In America, any place that sells oil is required to take the old stuff back, so I take the old stuff with me when I buy new stuff.  I can change the oil, but my bf usually says it's not girl work so he does it.  The entire job takes less time than what's required to drive the car to an oil change place and back.  Why spend extra money so that something consumes more time?  Never made sense to me.

- k

It's for the ham who can't be bothered to do easy things himself like rotate tires, change oil, clean furnace's filters, mend a leaky faucet, patch a hole in drywall, or any of a number of other really easy things that many people today prefer to pay someone to do.

If you've got the money, and want to focus on "station building" instead of "assembly technician" work, there's nothing wrong with paying to have a power plug installed.  Not all of us are that well-heeled.

- k

I do not change the oil on my vehicles. Why should I bother buying the oil & filter, jacking the car up. Crawl underneath, dump the oil (Where do get rid of that? Down the storm drain?) etc etc when I can take it to a garage and have it changed for $25. Hell the filter and oil would cost me almost as much.

I do not rotate my vehicles tires either, I get that done for free (You need some connections  Grin)
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W5DQ
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Posts: 1209


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« Reply #38 on: June 15, 2012, 01:30:34 PM »

I thought I had seen everything, but this has to take the cake.

http://www.rfconcepts.com/s.nl/it.A/id.7441/.f

I see that the only plugs they offer are 250V, 20A NEMA 6-20P, black . The sole choice is whether the plug is straight or right-angle. For a lot less than $45, the manufacturer could simply pack both plugs in the box with the amplifier, and let the customer decide which one to put on.

If, for whatever reason, a licensed radio amateur is incapable of attaching an a.c. plug to a power cord, how could he be expected to properly connect his antenna coax to the output receptacle of the amplifier, connect the radio to the input receptacle, and wire up the control circuitry, without blowing something up?

What if the owner decides a few days later that he really needs the other type of plug? Would he send the amplifier back to the factory to have it replaced, and if so, would they charge another $45, or would they offer a discount for the exchange?

For $7000, it seems awfully cheap of a reputable company to ship an amplifier minus the power cord plug.

Not withstanding the fact that a competent ham should be able to wire his or her own AC plug, $45 for a wired 220V plug and cable ready to insert in the wall is not a bad price. Undoubtly you have never had to use an electrician for any home wiring task. Them boys (and girls) ain't cheap and it would take more than a couple of minutes to install and configure a 220V plug and cable for an Alpha amp, set the transformer jumpers and such for the proper voltage, etc and test it. If you're already buying an Alpha amp, I'd easily add in $45 for the service. But for the price of the amp, the only thing better would be it added for FREE!

And before anyone starts casting dispersions on my abilities based on this reply, yes I can wire easily wire it myself. In fact, I have wired my entire shack and shop building with standard 20A 115V outlets, several 30A 220V general service drops and a shared 50A 220V for a MIG welder and 10" heavy duty table saw. I think I could easily handle a amp cable and plug since I have already done two of them Smiley

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
W6CD
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Posts: 213


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« Reply #39 on: June 15, 2012, 10:55:43 PM »

I used to be able to wire up most anything, solder the very small stuff, etc.  But now after retina detachments, a retina central vein problem, issues with optic nerves, and several eye surguries - I no longer can do many of these types of things for myself.  I therefore am a customer of things that some may think a ham should be able to do for themselves.  And even if somewhat expensive I appreciate when a needed simple gizmo is available for purchase.
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W2RWJ
Member

Posts: 188




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« Reply #40 on: June 16, 2012, 07:40:07 AM »

I thought I had seen everything, but this has to take the cake.

http://www.rfconcepts.com/s.nl/it.A/id.7441/.f

I see that the only plugs they offer are 250V, 20A NEMA 6-20P, black . The sole choice is whether the plug is straight or right-angle. For a lot less than $45, the manufacturer could simply pack both plugs in the box with the amplifier, and let the customer decide which one to put on.

A better solution would be to install an IEC 60320 inlet on the chassis, and ship both cords with the unit.  C20 and C22 series inlets are rated at 20A

All are UL, CSA, and IEC approved for worldwide use.
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KD8IOI
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #41 on: June 16, 2012, 08:02:19 PM »

Array Solutions provides the correct plug at no charge on the Acom amplifiers that they sell.
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K6AER
Member

Posts: 3524




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« Reply #42 on: June 16, 2012, 08:53:11 PM »

I have been gone for two weeks. I can't beleive everyone is still talking about plugs.

NOW FOR A MAJOR ANOUNCEMENT. ALL OF NORTH AMERICA IS WIRED FOR 120 and 240 VOLTS.

We don't have 110 or 115 or 117 VAC.

There. I feel so much beter.
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N3JBH
Member

Posts: 2358




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« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2012, 09:08:54 PM »

Quote
NOW FOR A MAJOR ANOUNCEMENT. ALL OF NORTH AMERICA IS WIRED FOR 120 and 240 VOLTS.

Dang it i knew that silly sticker on the panel down stairs was wrong 480 VAC  Roll Eyes
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K6AER
Member

Posts: 3524




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« Reply #44 on: June 17, 2012, 04:52:37 PM »

Your home is wired for 480 single phase?
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