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Author Topic: Computer speed  (Read 15714 times)
KJ6WEV
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« on: May 31, 2012, 12:43:05 PM »

To start I have a Dell Inspirion 1150 with a Celeron Processor. Upgraded to the max of 1GB ram. After the ram upgrade it ran great but slowly slowed to a crawl after some weeks. Tried Defrag and Disk Cleanup no help. Turned it off one night frustrated at it's pace but the next morning when I turned it on it was running as fast as when it was first upgraded.

I know things just don't fix themselves but it happened. Now it has slowed back down to a crawl. Something made the thing go fast and I would just like to know what. So I could do it again.

Your friend
Glenn
KJ6WEV
 
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AA4PB
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« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2012, 12:47:12 PM »

By slow, do you mean it is slow on the Internet or slow in running other programs? I occassionally find the Internet speed really slow (1MB for a 24MB service) and can restore it by resetting the cable modem.
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K5UNX
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« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2012, 01:23:39 PM »

Did you run it a couple weeks without rebooting???
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W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2012, 03:18:42 PM »

To start I have a Dell Inspirion 1150 with a Celeron Processor. Upgraded to the max of 1GB ram. After the ram upgrade it ran great but slowly slowed to a crawl after some weeks. Tried Defrag and Disk Cleanup no help. Turned it off one night frustrated at it's pace but the next morning when I turned it on it was running as fast as when it was first upgraded.

I know things just don't fix themselves but it happened. Now it has slowed back down to a crawl. Something made the thing go fast and I would just like to know what. So I could do it again.

Your friend
Glenn
KJ6WEV
 

Need more info. How old is it and what is actual CPU speed and type (Celeron M or what) I assume it is XP. By default XP will try to automatically make a large swap file and when you add more ram it just makes a bigger swap file. When it swaps code it crawls especially with a old slow HD. You need to change virtual memory setting to disable automatic swap file size and set it to about 512meg or so and reboot and you should see a big difference in performance.
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2012, 04:46:30 PM »

hi,

you may want to change automatic updates from
automatic download and install to notify only.
Then you can control when to update your system.

another thing to look at is in hard disk properties, uncheck

"Allow indexing service to index the disk for fast file searching"

73 james

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K5UNX
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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2012, 06:49:13 AM »

Also you mentioned running for a few weeks then turning it off . . . You should really reboot Windows every couple days or so. I know some people don't like that but I have never seen a Windows box that would run decently for weeks and weeks without a reboot.
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W8JX
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2012, 06:57:04 AM »

You should really reboot Windows every couple days or so. I know some people don't like that but I have never seen a Windows box that would run decently for weeks and weeks without a reboot.

I have several that are only rebooted when updated and can easily go a few months without reboot. I hibernate or sleep them. If you have proper hardware and software configuration it will do fine. What will really slow a old computer down is certain virus software and large swap files. By default adding RAM increases size of swap file and as you increase size of swap file, more of your actually memory is used to track and page it. You really want to manual set swap file size and with enough RAM (depending on OS) you do not even need a swap file.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2012, 08:25:49 AM »

I know things just don't fix themselves but it happened.
Your friend
Glenn
KJ6WEV
 
Windows rule #1 - reboot. It often fixes things. I always turn off the computer when I am finished using it for the day. No point in having it run all night while I am sleeping and the daily reboot is good for it.

At work, where the computer is on a network and updates may be pushed during the night, they ask that we restart the computer once a day and let it run. Still it gets rebooted every work day.

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W8JX
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« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2012, 05:21:49 PM »

Windows rule #1 - reboot. It often fixes things. I always turn off the computer when I am finished using it for the day. No point in having it run all night while I am sleeping and the daily reboot is good for it.

Bad rule and place unnecessary strain on HD from daily reboots. When you hibernate, raw memory code is copied to HD and it is fully off and when you "boot" it copies code back and it is in same state as it was when you left it open programs/apps and all. Saves a lot of time too.

At work, where the computer is on a network and updates may be pushed during the night, they ask that we restart the computer once a day and let it run. Still it gets rebooted every work day.

Bad IT call because it is waste of resources and lot of time wasted booting every day times "X" amount of machine. ONLY reason to reboot is to update if you have good hardware and proper software implementation.
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WA2CWA
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« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2012, 06:25:02 PM »

The boot, re-boot, turn on computer, turn off computer, debate on whether it creates strain on the HD has been around for years. I turn on my machines in the morning and I turn them off at night. If they're on, and I'm going somewhere for some period of time, I turn them off. Been doing this with all my machines since the 80's. I've never had a hard drive failure due to these actions. I remember talking to several hard drive manufacturers back in the late 90's and asked if daily turn on/turn off or re-booting of the computer adds undo stress to the hard drive. The answer in each case was no.

Pete, wa2cwa
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W8JX
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« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2012, 06:36:25 PM »

The boot, re-boot, turn on computer, turn off computer, debate on whether it creates strain on the HD has been around for years. I turn on my machines in the morning and I turn them off at night. If they're on, and I'm going somewhere for some period of time, I turn them off. Been doing this with all my machines since the 80's. I've never had a hard drive failure due to these actions. I remember talking to several hard drive manufacturers back in the late 90's and asked if daily turn on/turn off or re-booting of the computer adds undo stress to the hard drive. The answer in each case was no.

Pete, wa2cwa


A hard drive has a finite number of boot cycles and seek cycle. How many it is hard to say but HD will live longest when running nonstop rather than constantly booted. HD's made in last 4 or 5 years actually record start and boot cycles as well as total run time that can be read with software. My wife uses a old recycle P4 computer with com and parallel ports with her sewing machine with XP and a few gig or ram. From a "cold" boot it takes close to 4 to 5 minutes to get every up and running again (virus software, firewall, email client browser and so on) and from a hibernation boot it takes less than one minute and it is where it left off (word processing, surfing web or what have you) Shut down/off into hibernation much quicker too and will be off within about 10 second of hibernation command. When you hibernate you read raw code in form of digital 1's and 0's from memory into a continuous data strip to HD. When you "boot" it out it restores code to memory. You can use this technology and go back to 90's WIN9x mentality of constant reboots. Choice is yours.
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WA2CWA
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« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2012, 08:44:38 PM »

The boot, re-boot, turn on computer, turn off computer, debate on whether it creates strain on the HD has been around for years. I turn on my machines in the morning and I turn them off at night. If they're on, and I'm going somewhere for some period of time, I turn them off. Been doing this with all my machines since the 80's. I've never had a hard drive failure due to these actions. I remember talking to several hard drive manufacturers back in the late 90's and asked if daily turn on/turn off or re-booting of the computer adds undo stress to the hard drive. The answer in each case was no.

Pete, wa2cwa


A hard drive has a finite number of boot cycles and seek cycle. How many it is hard to say but HD will live longest when running nonstop rather than constantly booted. HD's made in last 4 or 5 years actually record start and boot cycles as well as total run time that can be read with software. My wife uses a old recycle P4 computer with com and parallel ports with her sewing machine with XP and a few gig or ram. From a "cold" boot it takes close to 4 to 5 minutes to get every up and running again (virus software, firewall, email client browser and so on) and from a hibernation boot it takes less than one minute and it is where it left off (word processing, surfing web or what have you) Shut down/off into hibernation much quicker too and will be off within about 10 second of hibernation command. When you hibernate you read raw code in form of digital 1's and 0's from memory into a continuous data strip to HD. When you "boot" it out it restores code to memory. You can use this technology and go back to 90's WIN9x mentality of constant reboots. Choice is yours.

I have an old P3 Dell here with only 1/2 gig of memory that I just tried a cold boot. 53 seconds to be fully up and running including virus software, firewall, and roughly 28 other internal processes. If it takes 4 to 5 minutes to get that machine up and running, it may have other issues. The two quad-cores here; cold boot is roughly about 30 seconds; the two duo-cores, roughly 45 seconds. So applying hibernation, and leaving the machine(s) on for 24/7, really doesn't present any glorious "wow" feature to me. I also don't leave the station equipment on when I'm not in the shack for any length of time, and I always shut the light off, if it's on, when I leave a room and don't plan to return. My mom always told me, many years ago, to conserve energy, cause "money doesn't grow on trees".

Pete, wa2cwa
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K5UNX
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« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2012, 07:23:21 AM »

Boot times are a useless statistic in my opinion. It depends on so many factors. CPU speed, disk I/O speed and how many programs get started at boot time.

I leave my home desktop machine running 24x7. I like being able to walk in there a do something without having to boot it . . . The only real downside is it collects more dust and I have to clean it out several times a year. I don't buy the HD life thing any longer. It might have held water 15 years ago but I don't think it does any longer. I know it's a mechanical device and has a finite life, but I have seen drive go bad in months and drive last years.

The most important thing that people don't do is backup their data. I does not have to be a whole machine image but should be at least their data.

Windows does need a reboot every so often to "clean" things up. Win 7 less than previous versions in my experience. If you are careful about what you install and keep a pretty basic machine running, it will last longer without rebooting. But Windows Troubleshooting generally means a reboot as a first step.

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AA4PB
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« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2012, 07:37:26 AM »

If an XP machine takes 4 to 5 minutes to boot then there is something wrong with it. I was testing an XP machine just last week for someone who claimed it took too long to boot. I measured 90 seconds from initial power up until everything was loaded and it stopped accessing the hard drive.

I just don't believe that booting a machine once a day (in exchange for having everything resting for about 12 hours out of a 24 hour period) is going to impact the life of the hard drive. Just having the fans on a 50% duty cycle is going to extend their life. Now I wouldn't want to boot it 50 times a day (every time I need to use it) but I maintain that on in the morning and off at bed time is good for it.
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W8JX
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« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2012, 12:14:55 PM »

I have an old P3 Dell here with only 1/2 gig of memory that I just tried a cold boot. 53 seconds to be fully up and running including virus software, firewall, and roughly 28 other internal processes. If it takes 4 to 5 minutes to get that machine up and running, it may have other issues. The two quad-cores here; cold boot is roughly about 30 seconds; the two duo-cores, roughly 45 seconds. So applying hibernation, and leaving the machine(s) on for 24/7, really doesn't present any glorious "wow" feature to me. I also don't leave the station equipment on when I'm not in the shack for any length of time, and I always shut the light off, if it's on, when I leave a room and don't plan to return. My mom always told me, many years ago, to conserve energy, cause "money doesn't grow on trees".


You are booting pretty vanilla because you really cannot load much on a 512K meg with XP. I am being realistic. The 4 to 5 minute fully boots all apps and mounts network devices and share and drivers for her sewing machine. This machine uses about 500 meg when booted and would really struggle on 512meg.

I do not like to wait for a cold boot and relaunch all my apps again. I like all my browser windows where they were and any open apps as they were too. I can come back a day, a week, or a month later and it is exactly were I left off. Again you can live in past WIN9x constant boot plan or embrace a better way.

BTW I consider it a full boot when there is no more HD activity.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 12:36:39 PM by W8JX » Logged

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