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Author Topic: Amphenol PL-259 connectors differences?  (Read 7343 times)
N4NYY
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« on: June 01, 2012, 07:08:06 AM »

I am about to order about 10pc of the 83-1SP PL-259 connectors for Field day, and found that there are 3 different types.

83-1SP about $4 each
83-1SP-1050 about $4 each
83-1SP-15RFX about $2 each

Does anyone know of the differences between the 83-1SP and the 83-1SP-15RFX? they are about $2 more, and all the connectors I currently have appear to be the straight 83-1SP. Google and Amphenol website did not provide differences.
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KA4POL
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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2012, 08:22:52 AM »

If you make a comparison at Mouser's you'll see only that the 15RFX takes RG10 while the others take RG9. Everything else seems to be equal.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2012, 08:42:00 AM »

I called Amphenol and asked. Got some lady that said the 15RFX was more consumer grade, and the other are more military grade. She didn;t sound very confident.
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W5DQ
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2012, 09:47:08 AM »

I am about to order about 10pc of the 83-1SP PL-259 connectors for Field day, and found that there are 3 different types.

83-1SP about $4 each
83-1SP-1050 about $4 each
83-1SP-15RFX about $2 each

Does anyone know of the differences between the 83-1SP and the 83-1SP-15RFX? they are about $2 more, and all the connectors I currently have appear to be the straight 83-1SP. Google and Amphenol website did not provide differences.

I have gotten PL-259's from many source over the years but recently have started getting them from Jim W6DHZ @ The DX Store (http://www.dxstore.com/) when I am at the Visalia DX Convention. These are high quality teflon/silver-plated and easily screw on to any SO-239. I have obtained some older types that would not screw onto certain SO-239's unless I wanted to use Vise Grips to permenently attached them Sad


Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2012, 10:06:32 AM »

I am about to order about 10pc of the 83-1SP PL-259 connectors for Field day, and found that there are 3 different types.

83-1SP about $4 each
83-1SP-1050 about $4 each
83-1SP-15RFX about $2 each

Does anyone know of the differences between the 83-1SP and the 83-1SP-15RFX? they are about $2 more, and all the connectors I currently have appear to be the straight 83-1SP. Google and Amphenol website did not provide differences.

I haven't looked to see if they've changed anything "lately," but for many years:

83-1SP had a silver plated center pin and connector body.  Really old ones also had a silver plated shell, but they substituted bright nickel for that a long time ago, retaining the silver plating for the pin and body.

The -1050 is all "Astroplate," that is a bright nickel alloy plating on the body and the shell.

The "RFX" is all manufactured offshore.  Last batch I received years ago were all "Made in Mexico" (label right on the box).  The 83-1SP's were all "Made in U.S.A." (label right on the box).
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KB3HG
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« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2012, 10:13:19 AM »

This is what I dug up, the link below is OK. What jumped out at me is the metals used and the insulators used 149 degrees and 165 degrees C max temperatures. Amphenol' s are good quality. Silver is better than nickel which is better than zinc. There is a difference. Silver costs more but really how often do you have to buy connectors? Don't forget the inserts for the smaller cables.   

Amphenol083-1SP
Conn UHF PL 0Hz to 300MHz Solder ST Cable Mount Silver
Parametric Search for Alternate Parts
select required values below
   
http://www.alliedelec.com/images/products/datasheets/bm/AMPHENOL_RF_DIVISION/70142677.pdf


Amphenol RF 83-1SP-1050 (PL-259)
Products > Connectors > Coaxial/RF Connectors > RF Connectors > 83-1SP-1050 (PL-259)
View More   Amphenol RF Coaxial/RF Connectors >>
 
 165 °C (Max.) Operating Temperature, UHF Coaxial Plug Connectors

Non-constant impedance. Non-weatherproofed. Mica-filled phenolic insulation. Peak Voltage Rating: 500 V. Operates satisfactorily up to 300 MHz. Connectors with part numbers that end in -RFX meet or exceed military specifications, but are intended for commercial use only. Military specification numbers, where shown, are for reference only.
For Antennas, cable assemblies, CB radios, low frequency applications and public address systems applications.

Amphenol RF
connector, rf coaxial, uhf str plug, solder/solder, rg8, 9, 11, 213, 214, 63, 87a, 225
Mfr. Part#: 83-1SP-1050 (PL-259)

73,

Tom Kb3hg

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G3RZP
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2012, 11:52:12 AM »

Go for silver plate and Teflon, preferably USA made.

Watch out for cheap imports that have a metric thread - which is why you want USA made. The silver palte is the easiest to solder to.
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4799




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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2012, 01:25:07 PM »

That is what I am going to do. Get the 83-1SP.

While I am on this subject, what is the loss of a barrel connector on the 10M band? I have 3 pieces of coax that I want to connect together to make one long piece for Field Day. I am thinking at 28 MHz, that the loss is negligible.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2012, 01:27:02 PM by N4NYY » Logged
WB6BYU
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« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2012, 01:28:55 PM »

That's a good first-order estimate.
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KASSY
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« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2012, 02:29:52 PM »

Read the data sheets carefully.  The more expensive ones will have silver-plated bodies and center pins.  This is desireable because it's easy to solder.  I'm lousy at soldering and if I have  nickel-plated connector, I always overheat things and make the center insulation swell up.  With silver-plated PL-259s, I get a good solder joint every time.  Something's funny about nickel that makes it hard to solder.

- k
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2012, 02:56:29 PM »

Read the data sheets carefully.  The more expensive ones will have silver-plated bodies and center pins.  This is desireable because it's easy to solder.  I'm lousy at soldering and if I have  nickel-plated connector, I always overheat things and make the center insulation swell up.  With silver-plated PL-259s, I get a good solder joint every time.  Something's funny about nickel that makes it hard to solder.

- k

The Amphenol "Astroplate" finish (-1050) does appear to be mostly bright nickel and it's easy to solder to it if you use a scrubbing process with the soldering tool.  This "scrubs" the solder into the plating, as opposed to just waiting for heat alone to cause it to flow (which can take a long time and a lot of heat).  It's an easy, foolproof process that takes practice.
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2012, 07:14:15 PM »

hi

I have a dozen of the 83-1SP-15RFX purchased
from Mouser, they are made in China.

73 james
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G3RZP
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« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2012, 12:07:01 AM »

I never did like Astroplate because of the soldering problem. I have learnt with nickel plated ones to use a Swiss file to remove the plating to get to the brass body. Which was fine, generally speaking, and then I found one with an aluminium body!

I have a good stock of USA made silver plated connectors, obtained at Dayton. I didn't get any this year, but in 2011, the price had gone up to 10 for $12, which I figure is good value.
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K2DC
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« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2012, 04:54:27 AM »

Vince,

  I wouldn't worry a lick about barrel adapters at 28 MHz.  Having had a need to know at work, I once daisy-chained about 15 in-series and between-series adapters together to measure with a Network Analyzer because I believed that the meaurement uncertainties (accuracy, repeatability, measurement noise, etc.) were larger than the loss of a single adapter.  The adapters were primarily Type N and TNC, which are all typically lower loss and better matched than UHF connectors, but they were all well-used stuff out of lab drawers and up to 30 years old.  The average loss each was 0.006 dB, and that was at 1300 MHz!  So at 28 MHz, as long as the mating connectors are properly installed, you can treat them as invisible.

73,

Don, K2DC
« Last Edit: June 02, 2012, 04:56:45 AM by K2DC » Logged
AB4TI
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« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2012, 06:59:28 AM »

# 2 for the DX Store. Good people there.
Danny AB4TI
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