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Author Topic: What Coax to use?  (Read 4779 times)
AC5UP
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« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2012, 05:37:31 PM »

My intent was to illustrate the absurdity of relying on web forums for advice... Like Doctor Hand twittering his way through a procedure.

BTW: I used to videotape surgery.
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Yo...   Vinnie...   Is Governor Christie too big to fail?                
K7KBN
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« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2012, 08:35:23 PM »

If you ever go in for surgery and notice the surgeon has a laptop next to the tray of instruments, consider beating feet out of there before the anesthesiologist does their thing.   Wink

And by what logic in this computer age does this have any merit? If you ever had arthroscopic or orthopedic surgery you would know that computers are kinda standard equipment in a OR.

If I saw Google's search box on the monitor, with "CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT" shown as the "search for" expression, I think I'd vamoose.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
AC5UP
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« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2012, 09:14:36 PM »

Bingo!



...although the mental image would be more compelling if the search word was " vasectomy ".    Grin
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Yo...   Vinnie...   Is Governor Christie too big to fail?                
KL3HY
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Posts: 112




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« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2012, 04:11:52 PM »

The references to cardiac surgery are funny and all, but speaking as a new ham myself it was very handy to be able to post quick questions to forums like this one while I was getting my feet wet.  Once I was on the air my interest skyrocketed and I began buying reference books left and right (don't forget your local libraries as well!).  However for simple questions, forums like these are gold for the new ham.

That said, one of the best references for me when I was building up my fixed 2m station was repeater-builder.com.  While lots of stuff isn't directly applicable to the individual ham's setup, the emphasis on buying the best quality coax you can afford is very applicable, and also very relevant to this thread. 

So Julie, to answer your question I would have to go along with VE3FMC's recommendation for LMR-400.  I've also been very happy with DX Engineering's (http://www.dxengineering.com) DXE-400MAX.  It's got very similar specs to LMR-400 ultra flex, and costs $0.82/ft. in bulk so it's pretty economical too.

Mike
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W6EM
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Posts: 638




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« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2012, 08:18:44 AM »

Let me drop in here post-op.....  Perhaps in the recovery room.
Poor Julie, a new ham asking for advice about coax and she's led on a tangent.  Including the oft-familar "I had to invent the wheel, so to really learn about it, you must too."

For VHF and UHF use, it's hard to beat Heliax or flexible hard line.  In fact, its so good, that it doesn't degrade over time as do the other types of coax with braid shields.  Because the outer copper corrugated layer over the insulation is fused together as a solid copper tube, it blocks any moisture from getting into the foam dielectric insulation to degrade it.  A problem with traditional coax.

If you look around, you can find used Andrew LDF-4-50, half inch super flex very reasonably priced.  And, if it is kink-free, about as good as the day it was made.

It can "take it" outdoors, meaning the thin plastic jacket over the corrugated copper can look rough from exposure, but under that corrugated shield, its like new.

The downside is the cost of the special connectors, at $10-20 each.  Ouch.  But the very low loss at VHF and UHF is worth it.

I run about 150 feet of it underground in conduit to my remote "bird house" where it rises up to a relay box.  Almost no loss at all in the run and I don't worry about squirrels, gophers or the elements taking their toll.

If you want rugged, long-life transmission line you won't have to worry about in 5 to 10 years, get some heliax.  Great stuff.

73,

Lee

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G4AON
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Posts: 494




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« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2012, 09:45:46 AM »

For a 50' run RG213 will be fine, no need to go to the extreme of using Andrews hardline and it's expensive connectors.

73 Dave
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KG6MZS
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Posts: 476




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« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2012, 08:56:55 AM »

Get yourself a copy of the ARRL handbook.

What a helpful answer  Roll Eyes

Buy 50 feet of LMR 400, and you will be good to go. One point, do not put sharp bends in it. If you need to do that then use RG-213 instead.

There is nothing wrong with suggesting the Handbook after suggesting an answer.  By itself it just goes to show that the misanthropic crank still lives in amateur radio.  Smiley ARRL's Antenna Book is also a great resource.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 09:35:45 AM by KG6MZS » Logged
WB6DGN
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Posts: 567




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« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2012, 10:19:50 PM »

Quote
If you ever go in for surgery and notice the surgeon has a laptop next to the tray of instruments, consider beating feet out of there before the anesthesiologist does their thing.

You KNOW its going to be a bad day if you happen to see a copy of "Surgery for Dummies" on the tray!
Tom
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9793




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« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2012, 01:06:30 PM »

for the original question, I suggest you get a length of coax long enough to go from the radio to the antenna, with the proper connectors on it, and put up your antenna.  most folks start with 2m repeater work, and litterally any coax will usually work  from rg 6, to rg 58, to rg 8x, to rg 8 u to lmr400, to Andrews heilax.  You first need to get an antenna up and hook it to a radio and antenna. play radio, learn about stuff, then do what you need to get better.  first get on the air, then get better later. you can get 50 feet of rg 58 or 8x for around 20 bucks, and be done.  good luck and have fun, no one will care if you are only putting 8 watts into the repeater as opposed to the full 10 watts. you only need about 1 watt to get full quieting, most places.
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AD6KA
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Posts: 2228




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« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2012, 08:44:37 PM »

Quote
If you ever go in for surgery and notice the surgeon has a laptop next to the tray of instruments, consider beating feet out of there before the anesthesiologist does their thing.

Why? %99.9 of medical diagnostic imaging
these days is digital, not on film. Just shows
that the surgeon has all the images he needs,
or at least past imaging, right there in front of him/her
both before and as he/she goes forth with the procedure.
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