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Author Topic: Coax in the wall  (Read 1521 times)
KF7ITG
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« on: June 14, 2012, 11:47:10 PM »

Coax in the wall:
I am completing a 30 x 40 shop with 12 foot ceilings. I am getting ready to insulate and then drywall. In one corner of the shop I have a work bench that is 16 feet on one side and 11 on the other. I would like to set up a station on a section of this bench to listen to as I work on other projects. My question is i want to route the coax for the antennas inside of the wall to the roof. If I go this route the coax will cross at a 90 degree angle two 110V wires. Where they cross they will be within 5 inches of each other at the closest point. One wire is to power overhead lighting the other goes to an outlet. If this is unacceptable I can always run the coax clear through the wall to the exterior then up. I just wanted to keep it as clean visually as possable without sacrificing performance.

Thanks & 73

James ... KF7ITG
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K2DC
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2012, 02:21:38 AM »

James,

   It shouldn't be any problem at all as long as you use good quality coax.  One of the things that cheap low quality coax skimps on is braid coverage, and that leaves it subject to leakage losses in transmit (losses and RFI to the rest of the house) and signal leakage on receive (potential RFI to the rig from otor noises, etc. on power lines).  Use good stuff and give yourself as much room as you can from power wiring and you should be jusr fine.

73,

Don, K2DC
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KC4MOP
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2012, 03:55:34 AM »

You should be fine. But think about expansion!!! No ham shack stays the same once it is in use??
Since I moved to my new QTH 7 yrs ago I have added 2 antenna systems. And by the end of the Summer another antenna for 6M.
My stuff is running overhead above the drop ceiling and comes down the wall in one of those big plastic wire management troughs.
Fred
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K1CJS
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2012, 04:08:42 AM »

Co-ax crossing 110V lines at right angles is no big deal, it is when the co-ax runs alongside the 110V lines that you may well get noise pickup.  I too would strongly recommend a high quality co-ax to do the run--for two reasons.  The first is as stated, the braid density.  The second is that cheap co-ax tends to be cheaper in all ways, including the insulation, dielectric surrounding the center wire, etc. 

As remote as the possibility may seem, any unseen damage to the co-ax could result in someone getting shocked when you're transmitting--or even a fire inside the wall.  Yes, it could well be that nothing like that will happen, but are you willing to risk it for the sake of saving a few dollars?

Good luck and 73!

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K4SAV
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Posts: 1840




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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2012, 06:03:25 AM »

As KC4MOP pointed out, running the coax inside the wall will lock you in, as to making changes later.  I would run it thru the wall.  How much lightning do you have, and how high are your antenna going to be?   It sounds like you are planning no lightning protection at all.

Jerry, K4SAV
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AA4PB
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« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2012, 06:36:26 AM »

I ran a couple of RG213 cables inside the walls years ago from my work bench to the antenna patch panel on the other side of the room. That gives me two ways to get from antennas or station equipment over to the work bench. I probably wouldn't do inside the walls for primary station antennas, but it works good for the bench application. I also ran dedicated 220V to the bench area in case I need to work on a linear amp.

I do have a large metal conduit run from outside through a 2x6 wall to a large panel box that serves as an antenna patch panel. That gives me an easy way to pull new cables into the shack from outside. The condut is well grounded outside and bonded to the electrical service ground.

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SWMAN
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« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2012, 06:41:45 AM »

James,
 If I were doing a new addition to the shack I would definatly add a few pull strings along with the coax in the wall.That way if you ever want to put more wires or coax in the finished wall the pull string is already there. just tie it off in the attic and leave a little tied off at the bottom where your coax exits. Us electricians and phone men in commerical buildings always do that after we pull a wire just as a curticey for the next guy. When you pull a wire add a string too.
 have fun and good luck. 73 Jim  W5JJG
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WN2C
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« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2012, 10:00:58 AM »

You might consider putting in some 1.5 inch PVC in the wall so that if you want to replace it. It will be a lot easier to pull through it than holes in the top plate or studs.  If you go out through the roof, use a 90 degree or a 60 if you can find one so that rain does not get in.  Then all you have to do is fish tape in in.  Did this in my shack all the way to the tower.  Coax runs through the attic in 2 inch PVC then drops down in to the shack.  Works great and I can put in more than 1 coax.

Good luck with what ever you decide !
73 de wn2c  Rick
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WB4AUW
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« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2012, 01:26:00 PM »

Rick got it right, best for expansion later.
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W6CD
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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2012, 11:07:41 PM »

When I built my shop I framed in the wall a verticle cable chase about 6-8" wide from attic down to the floor.  Pulling out or dropping in a cable is pretty easy.
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