Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 2010 chrysler radio install question  (Read 3143 times)
N8BBB
Member

Posts: 29




Ignore
« on: June 16, 2012, 10:09:41 AM »

I want to install my Yaesu FT 8800 in my 2010 Town and Country. I want to run the power from the battery to the rear of the vehicle through the firewall and possilby under the door trim at the sill. I cannot find an appropriate passage through the firewall. Should I drill a hole? How do I gasket it to keep water out?
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3842




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2012, 10:37:35 AM »

If there is absolutely no way to pass through the firewall... And that includes piggybacking an existing wiring or vacuum hose access port... A new hole would be the only option. As for sealing it, I'd try to primer the hole with some form of rust inhibiting paint, let that cure for a few days, then do the same thing Chrysler would have done:

Outsource it to China.

Ooops... I meant to say install a grommet to protect the wires from the sheet metal edges then apply a big dab of semi-hardening body sealer.... You know, the black tar-like goop you see in similar places under the hood. Possible retail sources would include undercoating or roof sealer. You want the black, gooey, sticky, nasty kind that won't completely harden because anything too rigid might crack or vibrate loose.
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 4474


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2012, 10:38:18 AM »

Use a grommet and after the wire is in position, goop it up with silicone sealant.  Done.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
Logged
N4CR
Member

Posts: 1663




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2012, 12:19:30 AM »

Drill, prime, line with a grommet. Run the hot wire. Get your ground from the frame near the radio.

Seal with Elephant Dung.

http://www.amazon.com/Gardner-Bender-DS-110N-1-Pound-Compound/dp/B000BO8XD6

Yeah, it's formally called Duct Seal. After you get some from your local big box store you'll find all kinds of sealing uses for it that have nothing to do with it's slang name.
Logged

73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
KB3HG
Member

Posts: 404




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2012, 03:15:57 AM »

By chance, have you looked at the under carriage of the van? does you town and Country have a power outlet in the back of the van in the cargo area?
Point being If the radio draws less than 10 amps you have power but tap the wiring and not the socket.
 
If you want fresh power, consider from the battery 2 fuses black and red wire suitable for amperage to be drawn, go one size larger to accommodate for voltage drop of the wire. run this through automotive plastic tubing, goop ends to keep water and trash out. Run it down the side of the frame down to the rear of the van to a point that you choose to bring power to. Drill, install grommet, prime, goop. Plastic bullet hubs could be used also, they are compression hubs goop them also.  The wire tubing can be attached with cable clamps (white plastic) and tech screws. Goop over the screws to prevent rust. 

Now, for the inside protect the incoming wiring avoid tight 90 degree bends if possible, terminate in a terminal or power block, If you use Power Poles instead, they also need to be anchored and protected. this install can be ver neat as you could enter the side behind the panels. At least I can do it in my older dodge this way.

The other guys gave great info.

Tom Kb3hg
Logged
K8AC
Member

Posts: 1466




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2012, 05:19:46 AM »

Personally, I'd take my cable to a shop that does car stereo work and let them do that part of the installation.  Drilling holes in a firewall is never a good idea and there is always an existing hole that the installer will be able to find. 
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20574




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2012, 01:19:48 PM »

Why would you need to waterproof a hole through the firewall?  Unless yours can drive underwater, there shouldn't be any water there, ever.

More important to insulate the wiring from the hole so the sheet metal doesn't damage the insulation over time with vibration.

My T&C LTD has a 20A "accessory" outlet in the rear, behind the back seat row (which is removable).  For a rig that draws only 10A max on transmit, I'd probably just use that.
Logged
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 4474


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2012, 09:09:56 PM »

Why would you need to waterproof a hole through the firewall?

Primarily as a cable restraint.  Secondarily for engine compartment odor ingress.

Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
Logged
K7RBW
Member

Posts: 387




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2012, 06:45:17 AM »

My T&C LTD has a 20A "accessory" outlet in the rear, behind the back seat row (which is removable).  For a rig that draws only 10A max on transmit, I'd probably just use that.
Take a look at the size of the wire they use, first. On my car, the 10A outlet is fed by a wire that looks like tinsel (maybe 18 or 20 ga?). I'd run at least a 14 ga (maybe 12ga if you're going all the way to the back) to minimize the voltage drop at full power. I ran 10 ga to the back of the car and see about a 1-volt drop at 20 amps. (I don't recall exactly, but you can check my post in the mobile forum where I tested it).

Also, in spite of what they might say, few of the factory accessory outlets (a.k.a. lighter sockets) in a car will handle more than a few amps. I've melted a few using a spotlight (5-6 amp) for more than a few minutes.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20574




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2012, 03:37:32 PM »

My T&C LTD has a 20A "accessory" outlet in the rear, behind the back seat row (which is removable).  For a rig that draws only 10A max on transmit, I'd probably just use that.
Take a look at the size of the wire they use, first. On my car, the 10A outlet is fed by a wire that looks like tinsel (maybe 18 or 20 ga?). I'd run at least a 14 ga (maybe 12ga if you're going all the way to the back) to minimize the voltage drop at full power. I ran 10 ga to the back of the car and see about a 1-volt drop at 20 amps. (I don't recall exactly, but you can check my post in the mobile forum where I tested it).

Also, in spite of what they might say, few of the factory accessory outlets (a.k.a. lighter sockets) in a car will handle more than a few amps. I've melted a few using a spotlight (5-6 amp) for more than a few minutes.

Yeah, I did look at that in my T&C.  It's all 16 gauge up front and 14 gauge in the back (longer run).  All fused at 20A per outlet.

I've actually powered 50W VHF rigs with these (temporarily, like for a weekend, but with a lot of transmitting a la Field Day) and never had a problem.

Depends on the vehicle.
Logged
KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2338




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2012, 06:38:31 PM »

Why would you need to waterproof a hole through the firewall?  Unless yours can drive underwater, there shouldn't be any water there, ever.

Well assuming that your statement about it never getting wet is true, and you never wash your engine compartment with a hose, other good reasons include:  Keeping out mice, wood rats and insects.

What? You've never lived in the country?  Smiley
Logged
VA3WXM
Member

Posts: 277




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2012, 06:02:38 AM »

Another option is pulling the wire where the hood release cable enters the cabin.
Logged
N8BBB
Member

Posts: 29




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2012, 11:07:09 AM »

Thank you for all of the good advice. I think I will look at the power outlet in the rear and tap onto this. I use Powerwerx wiring and parts. My last install I used 12ga wire with inline fuses from the battery to the rear, but this was on an older minivan with a better wiring route.
I am curious about a route for the remote wire from the radio base to the remote head at the operating station. The last route was a trough which was covered by the sill cover. My newer model does not offer this luxury.
Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks
Logged
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 4474


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2012, 12:23:56 PM »

Have you tried taking up any of the trim and seeing where the OEM wiring is?  There could be a covered trough under the carpet.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!