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Author Topic: Field Day generator obsevations.  (Read 22530 times)
KE4DRN
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Posts: 3710




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« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2012, 08:10:43 PM »

wow, 100 hours so far, you've not even broken it in yet.

your splash theory is nonsense, just like the techs
at mobile, etc.  they tell it like it is.

73 james
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W8JX
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Posts: 5335




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« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2012, 06:55:33 AM »

wow, 100 hours so far, you've not even broken it in yet.

your splash theory is nonsense, just like the techs
at mobile, etc.  they tell it like it is.

73 james

It is a backup unit and 5 years old and used in power outages or field day stuff. No nonsense about it. The friend I know did not imagine blowing up two units on syn oil and have 3rd unit do fine on conventional oil. Nor did I imagine mine blowing out CORRECT weight SYN oil through breather and not doing it with conventional oil. SYN is a long chain molecule unlike conventional oil this gives it increase wear resistance under extreme pressure (harder to squeeze out) and it also makes it cling and splash differently too.
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K3AN
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« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2012, 02:25:09 PM »

My 2-stroke, 900 Watt cheapie from Northern Tool has now done four Field Days. Total time is about 100 hours, including test running it every 3 or 4 months. I did learn I have to run it dry each time, and not use ethanol mix gas. Fortunately a FD team member was able to disassemble and clean the carb to get it to run this year.  Wink

No RFI, and more than quiet enough when it's at the far end of a 50 foot extension cord. We just have to make sure to place it downwind of the operating site, as the exhaust is as stinky as any other 2-stroke engine.

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N0MLR
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« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2012, 10:24:23 AM »

Having been in the Small Engine Business for 25 years I can tell you I have seen quite a few Presurized and splash lube systems that after a while smoke just a a bit when running Synthetic oils. But I have never seen a Splash lube or presurized lube engine smoke using the proper conventional engine oil providing that the proper service intervals were observed. I do not recomend the use of synthetic in any 4 cycle equipment.
Also the manufatures are now recomending the use of 89 octane fuel in all outdoor power equipment. The reason is that the higher grades are not messed with as much as the 87 octane and usually have not been spiked with Alcohol. Its only 50 cents more for a 5 gallon can and its cheap insurance.
Now for the guys out there that have 4 cycle equipment. To get the best life out of your trimmers blowers and chain saws as well as your generator use 89 octane fuel and a JASO rated oil of at least FD rating. If it does not say Jaso FD or higher then it is inferior oil. It will say it right on the lable.
Oh and having been trained as a Aviation Mechanic I am well aware of the Synthetic oils and its superior performance but I do not see the same results in its use in small engines.
The above information is offered for your consideration and is based on expert recomendations from experts in the small engine field. It was obtained by attending update meetings and personal observations in the past 25 years of  my time spent in the outdoor power equipment field.
73
Greg
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N0MLR
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« Reply #19 on: July 28, 2012, 10:27:33 AM »

OOOPS. Paragraph 3 of my previous post should read 2 cycle not four cycle.
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W8JX
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« Reply #20 on: July 28, 2012, 11:16:50 AM »

Also the manufatures are now recomending the use of 89 octane fuel in all outdoor power equipment. The reason is that the higher grades are not messed with as much as the 87 octane and usually have not been spiked with Alcohol. Its only 50 cents more for a 5 gallon can and its cheap insurance.

I do not use 87 octane in anything here car or power equipment. Also on 2 strokes it is indeed kinda foolish to use 87 octane for 2 reasons. One is they are more prone to knock/detonate under load because there is less time for combustion chamber to cool between ignition cycles and two mixing oil with gas LOWERS octane of fuel too. I use 93 octane in chainsaw in summer.
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W7HBP
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« Reply #21 on: August 21, 2012, 11:37:23 AM »

... BTW, I have a Honda mower, and my son rides a Honda bike.  Both very good products.  No bias here.

Agreed, I have a Honda self propelled mower and a Honda EU2000i and a EU6500is generator, Honda makes the best power equipment on the planet. But it comes at a price.
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W8JX
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« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2012, 02:27:29 PM »

Honda makes the best power equipment on the planet. But it comes at a price.

Very bold statement but not true. Suffice it to say the make some of the better or best one but not "THEE BEST"
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W7HBP
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« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2012, 03:22:15 PM »

Very bold statement but not true. Suffice it to say the make some of the better or best one but not "THEE BEST"


W8JX, what other brands have you found to be of superior quality? I'm interested in others input to.

I know there is other high quality units out there like Yamaha etc. But I have found Hondas parts prices to be real low cost compared to the rest plus add in the parts and dealer netwrok, its tough to beat. That is why, in my humble opinion, I rate Honda as some of the finest stuff out there.
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AE5JU
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« Reply #24 on: September 28, 2012, 09:04:44 PM »

My generator adventure:

http://www.hamuniverse.com/ae5jugenerator.html

Since this was written I have run it a few times with E10, and it has run smoothly.  But I followed that with straight gas and ran that out before putting back in storage.

Also, I have found a station nearby that sells straight gas, no ethanol.  Every lawn care outfit in town fills up there.  And boaters, too.

Other fuel stabilizers than Stabil that also have an equally good reputation are Pri-G and Seafoam.

For Hurricane Isaac we filled up six 5-gal gas cans in preparation with straight gas and added Stabil.  But after Hurricane Season we will not let this gas sit and go stale, but simple pour it in our vehicles and put the gas cans away for next season.

Paul - AE5JU
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KE4DRN
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« Reply #25 on: October 08, 2012, 09:49:18 PM »


... two mixing oil with gas LOWERS octane of fuel too. I use 93 octane in chainsaw in summer.

Did you mean raise the octane of the fuel?

Adding oil to the gasoline will raise the octane. The amount that it will raise the octane though would be very little. The reason for this is twofold. First, with a fuel-oil ratio on the order of 25:1 - 50:1, there is actually very little oil added to the gasoline. Second, when the oil/gas mixture enters the cylinder, the oil will "drop out" while the gasoline will remain a vapor. this is due the oil's lower vaporization rate. If the oil didn't do this, there would be no lubricating effect and the engine would quickly seize.

73 james
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W8JX
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Posts: 5335




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« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2012, 01:07:35 PM »


... two mixing oil with gas LOWERS octane of fuel too. I use 93 octane in chainsaw in summer.

Did you mean raise the octane of the fuel?

Adding oil to the gasoline will raise the octane. The amount that it will raise the octane though would be very little. The reason for this is twofold. First, with a fuel-oil ratio on the order of 25:1 - 50:1, there is actually very little oil added to the gasoline. Second, when the oil/gas mixture enters the cylinder, the oil will "drop out" while the gasoline will remain a vapor. this is due the oil's lower vaporization rate. If the oil didn't do this, there would be no lubricating effect and the engine would quickly seize.

73 james

No it lowers octane of fuel. Makes it more prone to detonate. If it truly dropped out it would not burn and smoke. Old all fuel tractors that could run of heavy distillates had very low compression engine, (below 5 to 1) to tolerate the very low octane of the fuels.
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KI4SDY
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« Reply #27 on: October 23, 2012, 05:50:51 PM »

I have an excellent mobile generator that reliably runs for hours when battery recharge is necessary. It is called a pickup truck. The antennas are already set up as well.  Grin    
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K3GM
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« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2012, 05:12:49 AM »

I have a question regarding synthetic oils and the ongoing "spash" debate in this thread.  I'm interested in this as I use Mobil1 in my Honda EG6500 generator with a 13HP single cylinder engine, and want to be sure that I'm caring for it in the correct manner.

I was under the impression that many oil brands, possibly including but not sure Mobil1, are able to brand conventional mineral motor oil as "Synthetic" anytime the conventional oil  is subjected to any unconventional process or reaction, irrespective of whether it improves the base oil.  If this is the case, nearly all brands of synthetic motor oil sold in the US are conventional motor oils, wouldn't they exhibit the same "splash" characteristics then?
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NK7Z
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« Reply #29 on: November 01, 2012, 05:55:20 AM »

I have a question regarding synthetic oils and the ongoing "spash" debate in this thread.  I'm interested in this as I use Mobil1 in my Honda EG6500 generator with a 13HP single cylinder engine, and want to be sure that I'm caring for it in the correct manner.

Hi,
For what it is worth, here is an experience I had using M1 oil in a car...

Car had about 75K miles on it...  Switched from "normal" oil to synthetic, Mobile 1, (M1).  After about 300 miles the car began leaking oil like a sieve...  Dumped about a quart in the first 300 miles...  I did a quick change and went back to "normal" oil, and the problem continued for the next 15K miles, then tapered off to about a quart every 3K miles...  Prior to this the car was not leaking oil.  It is still leaking a bit more than it ever did, but the mileage is now pushing around 125K.  It needs a half quart about every 3000 miles now...  The engine has always had oil changes on a correct schedule, and in most cases more often.  It was leaking no oil prior to the use of M1.  

I have heard this wife's tail about synthetic oil leaking from a car as being the norm if it is above about 40K...  I suspect it is the detergent in the M1 which cleaned things up really well, thus leaving lots of little gaps that engine gunk was clogging, thus allowing the M1 to escape...  

This is a guess on my part, but it seems to fit the data...  I have no idea how it will react in a newer generator engine, but thought I would pass this along...  Hopefully someone who knows more than I about cars/generators, and oil will pipe up and address this question...
« Last Edit: November 01, 2012, 05:59:38 AM by NK7Z » Logged

Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
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