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Author Topic: How to make the # sign?  (Read 406 times)
KD5ENR
Member

Posts: 14




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« on: June 18, 2007, 04:52:02 PM »

Is there a proper way to make the # sign? I can't seem to find it in my ARRL Operating Manual.

73, and God Bless,

Scott, EM02be, Central Texas
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2007, 06:59:33 PM »

I don't believe there is a prosign or extended morse letterset for the # sign.  


.
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WQ3T
Member

Posts: 209




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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2007, 08:45:33 AM »

Typically with SKCC, you send "NR" before you send the number. It is quick and easy.
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KD5ENR
Member

Posts: 14




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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2007, 09:13:46 AM »

Thank you very much!
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K7PEH
Member

Posts: 1124




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« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2007, 07:57:11 AM »

 >>>you send "NR" before you send the number. It is quick and easy.

Maybe someone should submit for consideration the prosign of NR for the # sign.  That way, we don't need to learn a new symbol as everyone uses it already.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




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« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2007, 09:47:54 AM »

Be sure you separate the "N" from the "R" when you send it.  Otherwise, sent as one character, you have "Dah di di dah dit", which is the slash bar "/".
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
W4YA
Member

Posts: 317




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« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2007, 03:12:15 AM »

Would N(space)R be a prosign?
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2814




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« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2007, 03:46:09 PM »

No - it'd be an abbreviation.  Punctuation and "prosigns" are sent as one sound pattern.  In books, at least in the ARRL books, such characters are shown with a line over them which I can't duplicate on this forum.  Old timers refer to these as "overscored"; i.e. a "left parenthesis" would be "KN Overscored" and a "right parenthesis" would be "KK Overscored".

Note that "KN overscored" would be the same as TP, or NG, or YE overscored.  They, whoever "they" are, settled on "KN" long ago.  

And, historical note, there didn't usta be different characters for the left and right parentheses.  That came about in the early 60s, I believe.  When I first learned Morse code in the mid-50s, the "KN overscored" served for both.  While you were copying, if you came to a parenthesis, it was automatically a "left"; the next one would be a "right", and you were waiting for it.  Same way with the quotation marks (AF overscored).  Since most typewriters don't differentiate between "open quote" and "close quote", there's no difference in the Morse character.  And since most CW operation was military, requiring legibility, the operators used typewriters.  Typically with blank key caps.  You had to be a very good typist!
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
W5HTW
Member

Posts: 729


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2007, 07:58:22 PM »

Pound sign?

Send:  lb

Ed

Or for more than one pound, send lbs

Next we'll be wanting a sign for the *

I still us "at" for the @ sign.
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