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Author Topic: Getting Started  (Read 2507 times)
KD2BHY
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Posts: 20




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« on: June 28, 2012, 07:57:28 AM »

Im a 12 year old ham and i really want to build a 40 meter qrp transmitter. I really need a really simple schematic. I have soldered before. I really am a beginner and ever since I got my General i've wanted to build a transmitter. I dont know a lot about electronics.
 
              73s
               KD2BHY
« Last Edit: June 28, 2012, 08:48:08 AM by KD2BHY » Logged
AA4PB
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Posts: 12836




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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2012, 08:39:24 AM »

I'd suggest that you consider a simple 40M QRP kit to get started. You can find some pretty inexpensive kits with Google. CW only kits will be the simplest and least expensive.

What are you using for an HF transmitter now? What will you be using as a receiver to mate with the QRP transmitter? You may want to consider a 40M QRP CW transceiver so you have a portable QRP station.

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KD2BHY
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Posts: 20




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« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2012, 08:48:34 AM »

right now i have a TS 520s
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KA4POL
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Posts: 1978




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« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2012, 09:04:03 AM »

Try to get in touch with hams in your area. You may need some help measuring. This will avoid you getting frustrated if it does not work right away.
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2012, 09:07:32 AM »

I'd also recommend a QRP transceiver kit, not just a transmitter.  Building from scratch with just a schematic can be daunting unless you happen to have a large "junkbox" with a lot of usable parts in it.  Buying components one by one from retail outlets (such as via the internet) can end up costing more than a kit.

Lots of stuff here: http://www.qrpkits.com/index.html

More here: http://www.smallwonderlabs.com/

Here's one that's not really a kit, but has full schematics and a lot of suggestions: http://kd1jv.qrpradio.com/ADC/ADC-40.htm

More: http://www.fix.net/~jparker/wilderness/nc40a.htm

Cheapie "transmitter only" kits: http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=QRP-SERIES

Easy-to-build 40m QRP transceiver kit: http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-9340K

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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13243




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« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2012, 12:20:17 PM »

If you have a quartz crystal ground for the 40m band, a QRP transmitter kit is very easy
using that.  It means you can only transmit on that one frequency, but is the simplest
type of transmitter.  (To change frequencies you plug in a different crystal.)

Here is my personal favorite (which can also be built for 80m):

http://www.qsl.net/g3pto/pippin.html

(You can simplify it a bit further, but this is a good starting point.)

The issue then becomes the construction practices, and getting the parts to build it.
As the others suggested, I strongly recommend finding a technically knowledgeble local
ham to help you.  They may have all the necessary parts in their junkbox (a generic term
for "electronic parts stash"), as well as being able to help with soldering, etc.  (This
circuit could be built on a "solderless breadboard", or other types of construction.) 
None of the parts, except the crystal, are expensive or difficult to find, and crystals are
available from various sources (including ham swap meets.)  Crystal control isn't a bad
approach to start on 40m where much of the QRP activity is centered around 7030 or 7040.
Having a VFO will be useful at some point, but requires a bit more care to get a good
stable signal.

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KA4POL
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Posts: 1978




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« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2012, 09:45:22 PM »

While everything here concerns a transmitter, what about receiving? Do you have a suitable receiver?
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3830




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« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2012, 08:45:38 AM »

BHY:  I'm onboard with the other suggestions here. Buy a 40m transceiver kit instead of just a transmitter.  This will simplify getting on the air without having to engineer the antenna changeover, etc.  THEN while you're having fun with your first go, then you might want to consider a simple transmitter.

Building a transmitter requires some expertise in component layout, etc.  Since you admit being a "beginner" be sure to find a build article that you feel you can replicate and follow that author's layout/componet choice as close as you can. 

I also recommend you buy an inexpensive digital multimeter because you'll almost certainly need one.

I also agree with searching for an Elmer or ham club to help in case you have difficulties.  This makes the whole process more fun.
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K8AG
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Posts: 351




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« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2012, 10:08:54 AM »

If he can find a local elmer I would recommend the Pipin transmitter.  It is very basic and a 12-year-old is likely to be somewhat $$ depleted.  He can also learn a lot about parts and how the transmitter works.  Building a kit many times becomes rather cookbook.  He can use his 5200 for a receiver.  Parts are easily available and substituted.  He could even wind the inductors on cardboard tunes.

Than's my 2-cents.

73, JP, K8AG
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