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Author Topic: Looking for Shop/person to do BC-348R restoration  (Read 5721 times)
KB1JFZ
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« on: July 01, 2012, 08:17:40 AM »

Any recommendations on where to get a BC-348R restored?

I have checked the amateur radio repair page here, but there is really no listing by specialty. I went through allot of them and nothing sticks out for working on old military gear.

The radio appears to have been converted by a previous owner to run off of AC vice the original dynamotor. I don't know if he did the other popular amateur conversions when these things became available. Cosmetically it is in great shape and has the original base plate. It came from a local estate sale of the original owner.

I am currently involved in trying to restore a Hallicrafters S-38a and don't have the time (or experience) to take on the BC-348R.

I really would like to get it done by someone who has experience with this radio. I would rather wait than have someone do a bad job on it.

Any advice or direction would be greatly appreciated!

73
Dave  KB1JFZ
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G3RZP
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2012, 09:43:15 AM »

Do you mean restored to original condition? That could take a very longtime, especially if the metal bathtub capacitors need replacing - which probably means rebuilding with new caps in the original can. Getting replacement resistors of the original type could be difficult.

But finding the dynamotor could be really difficult.

Depends on what you are looking for.
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KB1JFZ
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2012, 02:31:18 PM »

I guess I should have used a better term other than restored. I want to get it working again. I am not a purest other than the outside of the case should look original, and the inside should be of that era but can use new off the shelf parts (replaces caps, tubes, etc with new or good used for tubes) I do not need/want the dynamotor. I am not sure about the other changes that may have been done. From the reading I have done, QST had all types of mods for them in the 50's Some good, some not so good.

Dave
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AC5UP
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2012, 02:52:15 PM »

The BC-348 was a very popular set and bazillions of them became surplus in the 50's.... Which means there are gazillions of articles about them on the web. Be aware there were something like five or six versions of the radio so don't be surprised if yours was modded to the next version up or tweaked for SSB. Check the BAMA site for more and there is at least one web site devoted to everything BC-348 which can fill you in on the history.

As for the dynamotor, you don't want one. They weren't exactly silent and if you think a 60 cycle hum is annoying, I can tell you that 400 cycles is worse...........    Tongue
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KB1JFZ
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2012, 05:04:17 PM »

Thanks.  I have been to the BAMA site and numerous others, which is why i want to have it fixed and running.

Dave
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W8AAZ
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« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2012, 06:41:15 PM »

If you look at it as a vintage shortwave receiver, not a ham receiver, that can broaden your search, as there are alot of people that do antique radio restorations with websites. Or the military radio collectors, I am sure that there are some among them that do repairs.  Don't look at it as a ham rig and just look in the narrower category of people that work on ham rigs. That being said, there are websites of people that have overhauled them to work and it sounds like an in depth restoration with a ton of caps needing replaced and probably some resistors too. And the crystal filter device can be a headache, I gather.   
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G3RZP
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2012, 12:55:01 AM »

Back in the days when 73 was a good magazine (before Wayne went crazy on repeater articles) there was an article about improving the 348 crystal filter. But I can't remember the details. It would have been in the 1960s.
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KE0ZU
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« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2012, 06:18:37 AM »

Go here and scroll down to the bottom of the page.  There is enough there to make you an expert, but it'll take a few minutes. Grin
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N4NYY
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2012, 11:14:30 AM »

You should do it yourself. At least the restoration, recap, component replacement, cleaning, etc. If the operation or functionality if too much for you, at that point get help. Restorations are expensive.
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W8JI
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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2012, 02:00:25 PM »

I can't imagine ever paying what a restoration would cost, unless the person doing the restoration was just doing it for love.

I probably have 2-3 thousand dollars of labor, materials, and parts in a Globe Scout 65.

Of course just getting something running is a whole lot different, but a BC348 can be a real PITA to get working. I know, because I have one. A safe power supply took a half day of work and a pile of parts, and now I have a BC348 that won't kill me but still has no BFO.      :-)

When I got it, some idiot had a line operated half wave voltage doubler in it. The thing knocked me across the room. 

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AC5UP
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2012, 02:23:49 PM »

Many, many moon ago I was given a loaner BC-348 to satisfy my curiosity about SWL'ing.

The radio worked reasonably well, gave me the bug to buy an FRG-7 of my own, but what I remember most about it is how much the damn thing weighed... Geez, Louise was that one dense mother of a radio! Never opened it up but I wouldn't have been surprised if it was 90% laminated iron inside.

No worries about leaving that one outside on a windy night... It would definitely be there in the morning.   Tongue
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N4NYY
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« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2012, 06:14:00 PM »

Quote
Of course just getting something running is a whole lot different, but a BC348 can be a real PITA to get working. I know, because I have one. A safe power supply took a half day of work and a pile of parts, and now I have a BC348 that won't kill me but still has no BFO.      :-)


How do you pick up SSB without a BFO?
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W8JI
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« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2012, 04:47:59 PM »


How do you pick up SSB without a BFO?

The same way I pick up ET's without a UFO.
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2012, 04:59:03 PM »

Quote from: N4NYY

How do you pick up SSB without a BFO?



Picking it up is easy:  you just tune in the signal and there it is.

Demodulating it so you can understand what they are saying is a different issue, of course...
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N4NYY
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« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2012, 11:00:36 AM »

Quote from: N4NYY

How do you pick up SSB without a BFO?



Picking it up is easy:  you just tune in the signal and there it is.

Demodulating it so you can understand what they are saying is a different issue, of course...


I thought I was told on those pre-SSB era rigs,  that a BFO would be able to make SSB audible. Is that incorrect.  I have have had my hands on a pre-SSB rig like that. 

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