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Author Topic: Civil War hero Johnny Clem Day: August 11, 2012 SES: W8TNX  (Read 5300 times)
W3HKK
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Posts: 621




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« on: July 01, 2012, 01:50:18 PM »

sponsored by the Licking County Historical Society ( see their website for details.)  and COOKEN ARC station W8TNX.

Johnny Clem  was born in Newark, Ohio, and served in the US Army as a mere child,  eventually moving up to the rank of General!   His amazing story is celebrated on this day,  when  W8TNX is activated. 

Come join us  Saturday, August 11, 2012 from 10 am EDST until 4 pm. Operating frequency will be  around 7.170  or 7.230, ssb, depending on QRM. 

QSL and Certificate info:
-You may print  your own  handsome  8.5 x 11" certificate,  once the logs have been entered.
-eQSLs are available via LOTW.
-Paper QSLs  are available  by mailing your card and an sase  to W3HKK. 

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W3HKK
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Posts: 621




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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2012, 04:51:15 PM »

UPDATE:  Being a bunch of early birds, we will likely be on the air around 9am, about an hour earlier than  announced.  Better propagation too.

Look for W8TNX around 7.170  or 7.230 +- depending on QRM.
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W3HKK
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Posts: 621




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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2012, 05:20:56 AM »

Thanks to all 141 stations who took the time to work us on or around 7.190 ssb.  The logs will soon be uploaded to LOTW  and to the www.cooken.org website where you can download and print your own handsome certificate.

Lots of civil war buffs out there!

Brief History:
John Clem, the "drummer boy of Chickamauga, was born in Newark, Ohio  on Aug 13, 1851, When  President Lincoln made a call for volunteers to join the Union Army to fight in the Civil War, Johnny ran away from home at age nine and tried to join the newly formed 3rd Ohio Infantry, in 1861.  He was refused due to his young age, but he persisted and went to Michigan where he again tried to enlist , this time in the 22nd Michigan Infantry, where he was again refused.  But his determination   won over the officers who allowed him to join them as mascot and unofficial drummer boy. He was eventually allowed to enlist in 1863, at age 12.

Clem became famous for his actions at Chickamauga. For those actions, Clem was promoted to Sargent, and thus became the youngest NCO ever in the US Army history.

Clem went on to fight  at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Kennesaw,  and Atlanta, where he was wounded twice and was captured by the Conferate Army in 1863, reportedly with three bullet holes in his cap.  The Confederte newspapers made fun of his youth and small size, saying it showed how  depleted the Union Army was, for  sending such  a babe to fight.  Clem was  later exchanged  for a Confedrate soldier and returned to the Union Army.

Clem was discharged from the Army in 1864, at age 13,  and returned to school, graduating in 1870.  Clem then reenlisted, and was granted the commission of 2nd Lieutenant, by President U.S. Grant, recognizing his fame and notoriety.  Clem rose to the rank of Colonel, and Assistant Quartermaster General by 1906, and retired from the Army as  Brigadier General in 1915.

Clem died in Texas in 1937,  and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

His home town of Newark, Ohio  mounted a 6 ft bronze statue depicting  the young Johnny Clem. Also a public school bears his name, and  a WW I troop transport ship was named The John. L. Clem.
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KD5RGJ
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Posts: 34




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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2012, 03:19:52 PM »

But he fought for the wrong side  !!! But seriously i missed the event....just read about it.
KD5RGJ
Spencer
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