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Author Topic: Commercial CW Stations?  (Read 827 times)
N4LCV
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Posts: 32




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« on: July 10, 2007, 09:15:59 AM »

Are there any commercial CW stations still in operation? If so, where would I find them? I think it would be fun to see how much of it I could copy.

Thanks

N4LCV
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KC2MJT
Member

Posts: 59




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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2007, 06:18:26 PM »

The commercial CW stations in the U.S. ended operations in the very recent past. I believe World Radio had a nice article about the last transmission, but then again it could have been just about any ham related rag.

The Korean fishing fleets, the Cubans and I'm sure others still use CW.  Nevertheless, if you want to relive the a transmission from a commercial maritime station you might participate in the Night of Nights:  http://www.radiomarine.org/index.html

73
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3926




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« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2007, 06:56:41 AM »

Night of Nights VIII is TONIGHT!

If you are interested in commercial CW stations, go here:

http://www.radiomarine.org/

and click on

"Night of Nights VIII"

for info.

Lots of other great stuff on that site.

--

There are still several US commercial maritime shore stations on the air today - they're just not on the air much. FCC actually issued a new license for one, some time back (KSM).

Please note that an amateur license does not allow you to operate such a station - you need at least a Second Class Commercial Radiotelegraph license. They are still issued by FCC!

73 de Jim, N2EY
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2007, 04:16:16 PM »

Furthermore, to transmit on those frequencies, you need the 2nd or 1st graph, but also the Station License.  ( The difference between 2nd and 1st is that 1st has to spend a year of actual work aboard a ship or at a coastal station to earn it )  I used to love seeing my 2nd graph with all endorsements hanging next to all those 1st phones at the broadcast TV station...  


However, you can listen on the assigned marine freqs and then QSY to make a CW confirmation report on the amateur bands:

Amateur station K6KPH will transmit and listen on 3550, 7050 and 14050kc for KPH, KFS and KSM reception reports.

Professional operators will be at the key and commercial procedures will be used. But please don't hesitate to call, no matter what your code speed or experience level may be.


.
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W5HTW
Member

Posts: 729


WWW

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« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2007, 09:19:33 AM »

Night of Nights was a success!!  I monitored for hours as KPH ran the wheel, and gave traffic lists.  Also monitored KSM.

The FCC will still issue a new CW station license for the maritime service.  KSM was licensed a couple of years ago, but it does not have to be the last one.  KSM operates weekly (Saturdays) asn an official CW maritime station.  It is the only US maritime CW shore station in regular operation.  It will accept genuine traffic from ships, though few American ships would take the time to send CW traffic.

There is, though, quite a lot of maritime CW in use in other areas in the world.  Korea has quite a bit of it, and so does Mexico.  Some of it is from South America as well as throughout Asia.

The French government still trains its operators on CW, and one of the training stations can be heard on 6950 khz, on an intermittent basis.  It sends 5-letter code groups (not actually enciphered, no meaning) as practice to its French military trainees.  It is very good code practice.  

I have heard some Korean stations handling CW traffic in the past six months, but it's kinda hard to find.  There is also some military (not US) CW traffic around 5235 khz now and then, two way contacts.  I think it may be from either Cuba or Venezuela.

So CW isn't "gone."  But there isn't much in comparison to what there used to be.   I scan the bands and occasionally find a new  (new to me) CW utility or maritime station, but it is getting harder and harder to do so.

Ed
 
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2007, 05:41:36 PM »

Was surprised at how many I could hear in Virginia.

NMN, of course, is right hear, blasting away it was!  


Brought back memories.  


Thanks for the headsup on this one.  


73,


.
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W4YA
Member

Posts: 317




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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2007, 04:28:57 AM »

The first commercial CW station that I copied was WID26 in 1950. Is there a website where I might find info about this station?
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2838




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« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2007, 08:19:14 AM »

I used my friend Google to see what I could find.  There's an article on this webpage (scroll down to page 12, left-hand side.

http://www.floridacontestgroup.org/newsletter/mar04.pdf

However, it seems you may already be quite familiar with this article...(chorkle!)
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
W4YA
Member

Posts: 317




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« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2007, 03:36:06 AM »

Thanks. This is a mystery that will never be solved I'm afraid.

There is a Google reference that "de WID26" was sent in Morse code by a UFO in the '50s.  I'm sure that UFOs used Morse code to communicate!!!
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2007, 08:49:39 AM »

Not only was that UFO licensed with a US call, it likely had a red and green running light port and starboard...


My ex was a WAF who answered the base phone back when I was USAF.  

Uh-huh.



.
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