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Author Topic: Testing  (Read 410 times)
W5UX
Member

Posts: 39




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« on: June 29, 2007, 03:34:21 PM »

I would like to see a list of countries banning morse testing.  Then a list of countries keeping the morse testing requirement.  
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AE6RF
Member

Posts: 151


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2007, 07:50:10 AM »

I'm not sure that the word "ban" is appropriate in this case.

"Eliminate" would be better. "remove" perhaps.

Ban implies that Morse code testing has become illegal. (which it hasn't, just not required anymore.)

73 de Donald
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2007, 05:00:33 PM »

Except for the US military, which actually did ban CW.  

.
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N4KZ
Member

Posts: 598




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« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2007, 08:41:49 AM »

I think ban is too strong a word too when it comes to testing. But I hear as much cw on the air as I ever did.

But I too would like to see an up to date list of countries that have eliminated Morse testing. Just curious. Seems that most European nations have, plus Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and, the U.S. Some in Africa and Hong Kong have followed suit. But Japan has not. It did cut its speed to 5 wpm. Of course, Japan skirted international regs for years with its 10-watt HF phone ticket with no code required. They claimed these licensees only carried out domestic communications within JA. But that was nonsense. I worked hundreds of their no-code HF ops over the years -- mainly on 15 meter SSB.  And many of them ran 100 watts instead of 10 watts. Many openly discussed it on the air because the JA comunications regulators looked the other way.

But so far they continue with their cw requirement for the JA extra class ticket which permits a kw and access to 20 meters.

73, N4KZ
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




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« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2007, 09:29:38 AM »

I'm not sure if it's true today, but one of the requirements for the highest grade of Japanese amateur radio license, in addition to demonstrated proficiency in International Morse code, was demonstrated proficiency in "wabun", which is the JA version of Morse code, in which each sound pattern represents a syllable rather than one letter.

I can still do the equivalent of about 5 "wpm" in wabun.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2802




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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2007, 09:38:01 AM »

Just did a little research regarding wabun (see my earlier post).  Check out the eHam posting by JJ1BDX, about the 11th posting down at http://www.eham.net/articles/8518.

Apparently wabun is no longer required for the JA First Class license.  BUT, like International Morse, there are still lots of adherents.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
SQ9IVD
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2007, 11:37:50 AM »

http://www.nocode.org/articles.html

Here you can find list of countries who dropped morse code.

vy 73
Luk
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