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Author Topic: 10 meters and WWII Wehrmacht Panzers in North Africa  (Read 10780 times)
K0OD
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Posts: 2539




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« Reply #30 on: August 29, 2012, 11:03:23 AM »

An hour?  There's a lot of interesting  material there, such as this exchange:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

"l605 Napor to Upor: Everything is confused. They are attacking from all sides.

1605 Upor to Napor: Where are Kosterov and Sokolov?

1606 Napor to Upor: I don't know where Kosterov is, Sokolov is dead.

l608 Upor to Napor: Totshinko and someone else will take care of you.

1610 Napor to Upor: Situation is very serious, the shells are exploding ten yards in front of us. Fire more rapidly. We are lost, all of us.

1626 Napor to Upor: What about help? From where can we expect help?

1628 Napor to Upor: This is the last time that I am calling!

1629 Upor to Napor: Destroy all documents! Be heroes!

1631 Napor to Upor: We are fighting to the last round. We still have two or three left.

1635 Napor to Upor: The only ones left are three radio operators. May we withdraw?

I636 Upor to Napor: Fight to the last, we shall not forget you. Give us the three names.

Napor failed to answer."

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KC3YB
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #31 on: January 09, 2013, 02:06:41 PM »

When I was a teenager during the '60's, I subscribed to Popular Electronics. I am sure that during that time, I read an article in PE about a SWL or (I think ham) who received German transmissions on his receiver. My recollection is that it was 11 meters, not 10, but according to the article, he dutifully reported it to the government, who erected antennas and a listening station either in his barn, or somebody elses nearby. I recall that it was in New England. I recall the article saying that his transmitter had been turned in, or at least he was unable to use it during the war and listening was the best he could do.

I have searched for references to this article repeatedly, but haven't found them. I no longer have any PEs from that era.

I didn't write the article, so I don't know how well documented it was.
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KC3YB
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Posts: 2




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« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2013, 02:10:12 PM »

There were many listeners in the UK. Hams who were unfit for active service by virtue of age or health, marine radio ops who were retired and the like, all copying stuff and sending it to P.O.Box 25, Barnet, from where it went to a unit in Wormwood Scrubs prison for inital sorting and then the real interesting stuff went to Bletchley Park. This was the Radio Security Service, initially set up to catch spies. My father (G8ON) did that until he was called up for service in the RAF, and again after he was invalided out.


That was very interesting! What a cool way to serve!
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K3NRX
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Posts: 1982


WWW

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« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2013, 04:12:58 AM »

That had to be painful not to transmit during that time....I for one would have a tough time with that....but wow, reading through this thread made my morning...what a history!....Great stuff.....

V
KA3NRX
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K1DA
Member

Posts: 480




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« Reply #34 on: January 23, 2013, 10:34:42 AM »

Google "Darby Hill Road, North Scituate, Rhode Island listening post"  for some real info.  Yes, tanks in North Africa could be heard.
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N2EY
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Posts: 3875




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« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2013, 10:51:25 AM »

If an Amateur -- or anyone, for that matter --  had attempted to tranmit stateside during WWII on any of the HF bands, any arrest made would have been of that person.  Again, it was illegal for civilians of any kind to transmit during WWII

Not completely. There were exceptions made. W1AW stayed on the air for a week or two after Pearl Harbor, transmitting updates. They were authorized by FCC.

There was also the Wartime Emergency Radio Service, which was not ham radio per se but provided civil defense comms on 2-1/2 meters (it was a ham band then) and was mostly run by hams.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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W8AAZ
Member

Posts: 333




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« Reply #36 on: January 28, 2013, 06:13:02 PM »

And the hams also worked with weird stuff for comms during the war, like carrier current communications, basically worked like the "wireless" intercoms you have now, putting a low freq. carrier on the power lines.  And some odd ground conduction stuff, as in rods buried in the ground and audio pumped thru it. I guess that stuff worked locally.  My gramp told me something about picking up tanks overseas on shortwave during the war.  I cannot remember any details beyond my amazement.  But his big  AM/SW console was an early postwar model I think, so I am not sure what he heard or with what.  But I was aware of the possibility long before I read anything about it due to that.   
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