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Author Topic: Initials indicating your license status?  (Read 3220 times)
KC9KEP
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Posts: 208


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« on: July 20, 2012, 11:39:59 AM »

Gentlemen,

Would anyone know if there are specific initials that one can use to follow their name/title
that would indicate their ham radio license status?  (Similar to following one's name with their
certification for some field of study?)

Thanks!

73

--KC9KEP

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N5RWJ
Member

Posts: 461




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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2012, 01:14:08 PM »

Gentlemen,

Would anyone know if there are specific initials that one can use to follow their name/title
that would indicate their ham radio license status?  (Similar to following one's name with their
certification for some field of study?)

Thanks!

73

--KC9KEP


Try AT, AG,AE.
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KQ6Q
Member

Posts: 991




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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2012, 01:51:34 PM »

or just use your callsign, anyone interested can check you out online and find out your license class and whatever else you choose to post. Or submit an article for publication in QST or CQ, and get a mini-bio published with it. (and if you've been license a while list your past callsigns, in a ham publication

Fred Wagner, KQ6Q
(ex-W7HSS, HS2AJG, W5QDL, and K(N)6VVD)
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3965




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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2012, 06:39:03 PM »

This is one area where most people couldn't care less what your license class is!  If they find it necessary, they'll look it up as one here pointed out.

The only people who really care is the FCC and you can pretty well bet they will check that if you come to their attention.
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N0SYA
Member

Posts: 369




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« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2012, 07:14:00 AM »

One could always use DORK.

Cheesy
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If you have a clumsy child, you make them wear a helmet. If you have death prone children, you keep a few clones of them in your lab.
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2012, 08:11:35 AM »

Gentlemen,

Would anyone know if there are specific initials that one can use to follow their name/title
that would indicate their ham radio license status?  (Similar to following one's name with their
certification for some field of study?)

We're all supposed to be gentlemen and ladies here, so why should we find it necessary to do so?  Admitted, there are a few of us here that claim bragging rights, but that shouldn't come into play. 

Also, usually, the callsign itself could be used as such.  1x2, 2x1 and 2x2 callsigns usually indicate an extra class license.  Other than that, there is no need.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2825




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« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2012, 10:52:43 AM »

The "Amateur Extra" license used to indicate that the holder had at least two years' post-Novice experience, with the knowlege gained from that experience.  Today it's no license at all to Extra in two hours.  Why advertise it?
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KB1LKR
Member

Posts: 1898




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« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2012, 12:31:26 PM »

after your call sign: "/AG" if you've upgraded to General, or "/AE" if you've upgraded to Extra, prior to your upgrade posting to the FCC ULS database. Once the ULS is updated, you'd not need this.

AA thru AL prefixed call signs also denote US Extra class licensees, so upon passing Element 4 you could request a new systematically assigned call. 
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K7MH
Member

Posts: 344




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« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2012, 08:16:14 PM »

Just use BG
...BIG GUN! Grin
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KG4NEL
Member

Posts: 443




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« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2012, 11:13:47 AM »

Never cared to know, personally.

In a QSO, license class doesn't matter all that much.  Tongue
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N2EY
Member

Posts: 3913




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« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2012, 01:19:07 PM »

The "Amateur Extra" license used to indicate that the holder had at least two years' post-Novice experience, with the knowlege gained from that experience.

Not exactly.

From its inception in 1951 until the early 1970s, the Extra did indeed require two years' experience. But it had to be as a General, Conditional or Advanced. Novice and/or Technician time didn't count.

For a time in the 1970s it was one year. Then the requirement was eliminated, about 1975.

The requirement was pure calendar time, too. A ham could earn a General, Conditional or Advanced, toss it in a drawer and do nothing for 2 years, and it wouldn't matter. But no amount of experience as a Novice or Tech - or any commercial license -  counted in any way.

73 de Jim, N2EY

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N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




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« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2012, 03:30:38 PM »

Jim you are, of course, correct.  I'm pretty sure there were some military or commercial cw ops who made AE without much ham operating time.  However, every ham I knew in the 60's who was shooting for extra was on the air at least a few times each week perfecting their CW speed and technique. 

Neil N3DF
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Neil N3DF
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3913




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« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2012, 03:34:16 AM »

Jim you are, of course, correct.  I'm pretty sure there were some military or commercial cw ops who made AE without much ham operating time.  However, every ham I knew in the 60's who was shooting for extra was on the air at least a few times each week perfecting their CW speed and technique. 

Yep. Usually it was the most-active-on-HF hams who went for Extra, because they felt the loss of the Extra subbands most keenly.

OTOH, after the experience requirement went away in the mid-1970s, there would occasionally be someone who would show up at an FCC exam session with no amateur license and qualify for Extra all in one go. Often they were military or commercial ops who only needed to become familiar with Part 97, but once in a while there would be someone who simply learned the code and theory from scratch and went straight to Extra.

For historical completeness, note that before the old Class A/Advanced was closed to new issues at the end of 1952, it required 1 year experience as a Class B/General or Class C/Conditional. When it was reopened to new issues in 1967, there was no experience requirement for Advanced.

73 de Jim, N2EY
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