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Author Topic: LED bulbs-versus lightning?  (Read 2554 times)
W8AAZ
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Posts: 343




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« on: July 21, 2012, 07:14:36 AM »

The new LED bulbs are supposed to be long life and they are expensive. Also, presumably, they are solid state devices on the power line. Will a lightning surge on the AC lines blow them? Probably incandescents are largely immune, but if there were a nearby strike, could you end up replacing a lot of expensive lights?
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K1CJS
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2012, 08:07:31 AM »

The new LED bulbs are supposed to be long life and they are expensive. Also, presumably, they are solid state devices on the power line. Will a lightning surge on the AC lines blow them? Probably incandescents are largely immune, but if there were a nearby strike, could you end up replacing a lot of expensive lights?

Only if the surges were enough to harm other things in your home or building.  After all, the new solid state TVs are a lot more expensive than those LED lights.  Also, there are power surges at other times--not only during thunderstorms.  If those LED bulbs were so vulnerable, they wouldn't have gone on the market at all.  I wouldn't really worry about it.
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W9GB
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2012, 03:14:28 PM »

Quote from: W8AAZ
Will a lightning surge on the AC lines blow them? Probably incandescents are largely immune, but if there were a nearby strike, could you end up replacing a lot of expensive lights?
Surge protectors, installed at your main service (circuit beaker) panel, is current state-of-art.

These "whole house" surge protectors can be retro-fitted to many existing panels, as shown on home improvement programs (PBS, DIY Channel, HGTV).  That can address some of these issues.

w9gb
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G3RZP
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« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2012, 12:05:50 AM »

Certain ones give  problems with RF noise, screwing up the HF bands.
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2012, 03:28:00 PM »

Worrying about the LEDs in your radio in the event of a lightning strike? 

The LEDs would be the *least* of your worries, my friend. 

The LEDs would very likely survive. 

The same cannot be said for the first stage RF transistor(s), and sometimes the finals...


73
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K9KJM
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Posts: 2415




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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2012, 08:45:44 PM »

I agree with the install a "Whole House" surge arrestor at the main breaker panel and don't worry about the LEDs.    Every home should have one of those anyhow.

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KD0REQ
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Posts: 940




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« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2012, 01:11:57 PM »

a whole-house surger can still let things through... Romex looking like a transmission line, and all that resonance stuff.  important items like the FT9000 should be on its own surge strip, and ideally unplugged if the skies are putting out more power than you can.

as for those lightbulbs... Byte once reported on the science of turning them into noise-emitting diodes being big overvoltage.  you'll know when they go.
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 864




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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2012, 03:28:44 PM »

Certain ones give  problems with RF noise, screwing up the HF bands.

Yes, if you look up making wideband noise generators, some are based on LED's without using R.F. bypassing capacitors.

73 - Rob
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