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Author Topic: Repeaters not being used? You've been 'Punked'  (Read 6407 times)
KD5GR
Member

Posts: 101




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2012, 08:11:29 PM »

The 'Ignore' button is there for a reason.  Use it.

It certainly is.

Chas.
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NA4IT
Member

Posts: 887


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2012, 05:31:25 AM »

IMHO, repeater coordination exists to protect an investment. For those who have never dealt with owning or maintaining a repeater, read on.

1) Repeater sites are very hard to get. The best you can hope for is that someone will see that hams are an all volunteer group, and allow the repeater to be on their site free of charge, or for an agreement to "keep up the site" aka mow the grass. Those sites are disappearing quickly. I believe part of that reason may be the public postings that berate amateur radio.

2) An amateur radio 2 meter repeater, bought new, will cost in the neighborhood of $6000+. That's not a DStar, but just a regular analog machine, not counting heliax and antenna. 2M repeater antennas start at about $1000 and go up. Heliax is $3 - $15 a foot. Connectors can be as high as $100. So a huge investment is made, one which a ham or group of hams doesn't enter in to lightly.

3) Coordination exists to keep co-channel (repeaters on same pairs) and adjacent channel (repeaters on adjacent channels) interference to a minimum. CTCSS tone is sometimes used to help with that.

4) Repeater have their place in amateur radio. It extends short range communication across a county or a few counties. Without repeaters, there would probably be few handie talkies sold.

All that said, I encourage every Technician class ham to study and pass the General, and then Extra, and get on HF also.

IMHO, Technician is where you learn to talk, HF is where you learn to communicate... effectively.

de NA4IT
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W4AMP
Member

Posts: 96


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: July 30, 2012, 06:02:20 AM »

What's up Dog? At least there in Socal there is actually a repeater on the air with a coordinated pair. Here in the South we have "paper repeaters". Pairs that are coordinated on paper only. Some over 20 years ago!

And on UHF we are a secondary user, with the military primary. I know Pavepaws has just about wiped out 440 repeater activity in Cali and New England. 1.2 is enjoying a renaissance in California. Used it in San Francisco in 2009. A linked system that went from LA to Vancouver. Imagine the thrill when WA4DOG is heard on 1.2 ghz up the entire west coast! You can do eet!
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KE4YOG
Member

Posts: 182




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2012, 01:43:21 PM »

In Eastern and Central North Carolina some repeaters are used almost constantly and some not much. We have very little on 6 meter and a little more on 440 but 2 meters is of course the main thing. I really want the local club to get a 6 meter repeater but it doesnt seem that is in the offing. I have a fellow ham that would put it at his QTH and use the top of his 90 ft tower for the antenna but it is a little much for 2 people to do. I would really like a 23 cm repeater also but I KNOW that aint going to happen.
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W0DLR
Member

Posts: 14




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2012, 10:53:33 AM »

I have a repeater on 145.310, which is seldom used.  Like all repeaters, not much happening.

I was highly ridiculed for putting a tone access on it, however, it was close enough to a .10 cent packet bulletin board system that splattered all up and down the band (and still does)  A Packet system that mostly forwarded recipes, very important to ham radio.

My idea about a repeater is put up your own, don't take any donations, and then you don't have to take their advice.

Therefore I am still considered a bad ham.  All old men want to have their ideas used, afterall they have earned their status, they know CW.
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WA8IUR
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2012, 01:32:07 PM »

MAYBE IF WE ENCOURAGE MORE HAMS INTO THE HOBBY, THERE'LL BE MORE ACTIVITY ON THE REPEATERS. 73 WA8IUR
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6045




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: August 01, 2012, 08:45:54 AM »

Two meters and above is still a localized band.  Those repeaters were meant for short distance communications--communications that have been long since taken over by cell phone and other means.  THAT is why the repeaters are usually deader than a doornail except for regularized nets and commute times.
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WB6DGN
Member

Posts: 619




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2012, 10:28:11 PM »

Quote
Those repeaters were meant for short distance communications--communications that have been long since taken over by cell phone and other means.

Though I see it frequently, I just can't comprehend the comparison of VHF ham radio to cell phone use.  To my way of thinking they are two entirely different things used for totally different purposes. 
I use a cell phone to make an appointment; doctor, haircut, oil change, etc.  I use a cell phone to call a taxi or get a bus schedule.  I use a cell phone to order a pizza or make a restaurant reservation.  In other words, I use a cell phone for BUSINESS; personal or employment.
I use ham radio to say hello to a fellow ham, to check out the results of a radio I recently repaired or to test a new design or modification I'm working on.  In other words, I use ham radio in pursuing my hobby (which, by the way, is NOT ham radio, but electronics).
A cell phone will not work for my hobby endeavors NOR will a ham radio work appropriately for my business endeavors.
Perhaps that is part of the problem; using the WRONG TOOL for the job.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6045




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2012, 04:51:51 AM »

I see what you're saying--although in my area, there used to be plenty of useage of the repeater for things that many people use a cellphone for now, such as checking to see if bread or milk was needed at home, finding out if plans had changed to do something with the person's family and so on. 

Heck, one person even used the phone patch through his radio in place of a cell phone.  He even took to paying the repeater phone line charge every month so he could use it as he saw fit--within the rules, that is.  Last I knew, he was still doing so.

I guess you run across people of every type at one time or another!
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K7RBW
Member

Posts: 398




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2012, 06:01:44 AM »

I couldn't use my ham radio without a cell phone.

I text/call my ham buddies and let them know I'm on the air, then we'll use the cell phone to get things tuned up and communicating. Works on HF and VHF and it's much faster and more reliable than just calling CQ into the blind, although I do that, too.

I'll admit, it does seem kinda silly, at times, but as long as everyone is having fun, why not?
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6045




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: August 12, 2012, 05:16:37 AM »

I'll admit, it does seem kinda silly, at times, but as long as everyone is having fun, why not?

Now there is something everybody can agree with!   Grin
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