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Author Topic: Do you think oversea's hams know that barely 15% of US is Extra Class?  (Read 6724 times)
W9KDX
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Posts: 771




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« on: July 26, 2012, 11:36:34 AM »

Just curious as I often hear overseas operators seemingly eager for a NA contact, yet out of the general band.  You would think they would not want to exclude the vast majority of listeners if they really wanted contacts.  The same thing often happens on DXpeditions (thank goodness for 17 meters).

Also, is there a list somewhere that shows the worldwide band plans for each country.  I would hate to call CQ DX and make the same mistake they do.

Thanks
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Sam
W9KDX
KB4QAA
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Posts: 2488




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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2012, 11:59:43 AM »

It's not that foreign operators favor Extras; rather that the bands aren't the same and the overlap favor those with an Extra ticket.  There is always CW!
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KA4POL
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Posts: 2125




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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2012, 12:09:04 PM »

Go to http://www.iaru.org/bandplans.html

It is interesting to find that each region does have its own type of document- So much for commonality:
    Region 1
    Region 2 (PDF)
    Region 3 (DOC)
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2012, 01:42:15 PM »

Also be aware that he may be listening within the General Band while calling lower down in what we call the Extra band. 

If that's the case, a General who knows how to work splits and has the radio that can do so can make contact anyway. 

Calling down in the Extra band gives the overseas operator a chance to call "in the clear" as it were.


73
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G3RZP
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2012, 01:44:58 PM »

Which is why when I want a ragchew on 20m CW, I move up to 14035 or 14040, and beam the US. Regrettably, not many want a ragchew on CW.
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NO2A
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2012, 02:41:50 PM »

I have had dx call me as far up as 14.050. I`ve also had U.S. hams call me in the extra subband on cw.
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W9KDX
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Posts: 771




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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2012, 07:36:22 PM »

Also be aware that he may be listening within the General Band while calling lower down in what we call the Extra band... 

I'm aware of that and take advantage when I can.  It is rare though, usually they are so far buried in Extra territory that the up would be huge to get into the general range.  CY9M is working 20 meters like this (wishing for 40 up is not going to happen) and usually I can reach there on 17 pretty easily, but the sun has been a problem lately.
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Sam
W9KDX
KB1BZR
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Posts: 80




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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2012, 10:21:51 PM »

I sat on 3527 khz approx once with a good signal. The DX only wanted to listen below 3525 khz

Unless there is a bunch of interference around 3530 khz anything wrong with looking for DX there ?

Get this. I have had operators use my call sign from American Samoa. ya know..want a shorter call ?? (KH8AC)


They say because it is a 'General' they can make no contacts. I still feel if something is in demand such as AH8/KH8/NH8/WH8 on low bands it is too much trouble to listen/operate at 3530 or 7030  etc. No customers.




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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2012, 01:02:07 AM »

I think there is some truth in your premise.
Many countries don't have the fine segmentation that the U.S. licensing system has.

In my case I just tune the whole spectrum and work anyone I can hear, but tend to stick around the lower sections for CW.
This is because there are more CW stations to work(internationally), down lower, in my experience.
I would not have a clue as to the license grade of the U.S. station I work, any more than the license grade of other nations hams.

Most of my operation is however CW or digital modes such as PSK31, Olivia etc, so perhaps that area is more widely allocated to different license classes.
I guess this is the price we pay for being an international hobby with every nation regulating its ham licenses differently.

73 - Rob
« Last Edit: July 28, 2012, 01:06:47 AM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
F8WBD
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Posts: 78




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« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2012, 04:30:39 AM »

I operate exclusively cw and QRP 99% percent of the time. I am most often on or near 14.060. Be happy to work any USA station there...when I am back from vacation.
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N8HM
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Posts: 87




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« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2012, 09:57:23 AM »

Upgrade! The test isn't difficult. Just memorize the questions and answers.
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W5DQ
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Posts: 1209


WWW

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« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2012, 01:10:17 PM »

Also be aware that he may be listening within the General Band while calling lower down in what we call the Extra band... 

I'm aware of that and take advantage when I can.  It is rare though, usually they are so far buried in Extra territory that the up would be huge to get into the general range.  CY9M is working 20 meters like this (wishing for 40 up is not going to happen) and usually I can reach there on 17 pretty easily, but the sun has been a problem lately.

Why not? Many DXpeditions transmit in the lower half of 40M and listen in the upper end of 40M for US calling. Nothing says that a wide split can't be done although to do it properly assumes that there is some control and not dropping right in on top of a QSO already in progress (which happens from time to time unfortunately).

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
N2EY
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Posts: 3926




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« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2012, 01:35:46 PM »

Barely 15%? Not true!!

According to:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on July 19, 2012 was:

Novice:            14,058     (2.0%)
Technician      343,646   (48.7%)
Technician Plus          0     (0.0%)
General          161,613    (22.9%)
Advanced         56,909      (8.1%)
Extra              129,617    (18.4%)

Total              705,843

And that's not the whole story. Novices and Technicians have no voice or data privileges below 28 MHz meters, nor any privileges at all on 160, 60, 20 or the WARC bands. So for those situations, the totals look like this:

General          161,613    (46.4%)
Advanced         56,909    (16.3%)
Extra              129,617    (37.2%)

Total              348,139

Changes the game a bit.

73 de Jim N2EY
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4962




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« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2012, 02:10:57 AM »

Plus historically, DXpeditions have tended  to use between 14020 and 14025 and listen up  2 - 5kHz on CW. So people looking for DX look at the bottom end of the band. On SSB, around 14190 - 14195, listening up maybe 14210 - 14220. Even though it means that the Italian pest gets in the way. Again, it means that people tend to look round that part of the band.
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M6GOM
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Posts: 1014




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« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2012, 04:57:20 AM »


Also, is there a list somewhere that shows the worldwide band plans for each country.  I would hate to call CQ DX and make the same mistake they do.

Thanks

Typical attitude that makes the world hate your country. You assume because they don't do it "your way" that they're making a mistake.

It is your country buddy that is different to the rest of the world. It is your country effectively making the mistake.
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