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Author Topic: Do you think oversea's hams know that barely 15% of US is Extra Class?  (Read 4997 times)
N4RSS
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Posts: 258




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« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2012, 09:48:32 AM »


Also, is there a list somewhere that shows the worldwide band plans for each country.  I would hate to call CQ DX and make the same mistake they do.

Thanks

Typical attitude that makes the world hate your country. You assume because they don't do it "your way" that they're making a mistake.

It is your country buddy that is different to the rest of the world. It is your country effectively making the mistake.

Gee, no need to generalize his comments to impugn the whole country.  Would it be fair of me to believe your country is full of a$$holes based merely on your post ?  You decide.
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KG6MZS
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Posts: 476




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« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2012, 11:39:22 AM »

GOM, don't be so sensitive.  It is a mistake from the point of view that you are missing a lot of potential QSOs by calling in a less-than-optimal spot.  That isn't hubris or chauvinism.
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AD5ZC
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2012, 02:55:14 PM »


Also, is there a list somewhere that shows the worldwide band plans for each country.  I would hate to call CQ DX and make the same mistake they do.

Thanks

Typical attitude that makes the world hate your country. You assume because they don't do it "your way" that they're making a mistake.

It is your country buddy that is different to the rest of the world. It is your country effectively making the mistake.

Wow.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4391




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« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2012, 12:12:07 AM »

It is fair to say that most amateurs have very little idea about about frequencies available in other countries, and if they vary with licence class.

Some don't even know the limits in their own country!
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4742




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« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2012, 05:39:22 AM »

It is fair to say that most amateurs have very little idea about about frequencies available in other countries, and if they vary with licence class.

Some don't even know the limits in their own country!

I have been Extra for about 2 years, and I made some great DX contacts on 10M in the Tech portion of the band. Including a couple rare DXpeditions.
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G3RZP
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Posts: 4391




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« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2012, 06:22:06 AM »

It can happen. Not all DX hang out at the bottom end of the CW section or in the popular parts of the 'phone band.
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W9KDX
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Posts: 770




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« Reply #21 on: August 12, 2012, 03:24:32 PM »

Barely 15%? Not true!!

According to:

http://www.arrl.org/fcc-license-counts

the number of current unexpired FCC issued amateur licenses held by individuals on July 19, 2012 was:

Novice:            14,058     (2.0%)
Technician      343,646   (48.7%)
Technician Plus          0     (0.0%)
General          161,613    (22.9%)
Advanced         56,909      (8.1%)
Extra              129,617    (18.4%)

Total              705,843

And that's not the whole story. Novices and Technicians have no voice or data privileges below 28 MHz meters, nor any privileges at all on 160, 60, 20 or the WARC bands. So for those situations, the totals look like this:

General          161,613    (46.4%)
Advanced         56,909    (16.3%)
Extra              129,617    (37.2%)

Total              348,139

Changes the game a bit.

73 de Jim N2EY

15%.... 18% not really much difference.
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Sam
W9KDX
AE5JU
Member

Posts: 223




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« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2012, 07:52:41 PM »

Quote
And that's not the whole story.

Yes, it approaches 40% Extras when you remove the Novice and Tech licensees.

But back to M6GOMs comment,

Quote
You assume because they don't do it "your way" that they're making a mistake.

I think he is exactly correct.  Do any of you know what the license classes and band privileges are in the UK?  Germany?  Poland?

Paul - AE5JU
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W8JI
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Posts: 9304


WWW

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« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2012, 05:22:34 AM »


(This is sarcasm, just to show an example of WHY we all look down on each other. We are a hate driven society now.)
 
M6GOM is lucky we were around years ago. He probably would be DM2GOM without our help.

W9KDX, if you want to work DX, get an Extra. It is called  INCENTIVE licensing. You work a tiny bit harder, and you get a reward. Stop being that 47% of bums that wants a handout.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3669




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« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2012, 08:28:33 AM »

Quote
W9KDX, if you want to work DX, get an Extra. It is called  INCENTIVE licensing. You work a tiny bit harder, and you get a reward. Stop being that 47% of bums that wants a handout.

As I waded through this swamp the first thing that came to my mind was a variation of the above statement!  I was hoping to get to the end and make said statement but Tom beat me to it.

One of the major reasons for me getting the Extra ticket was so that I didn't have to remember the ham band sub-bands by license class.  I go where I wish.  I suggest you upgrade and enjoy this benefit!  It really isn't a big deal anymore.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2012, 08:33:04 AM by K8AXW » Logged
WN2C
Member

Posts: 429




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« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2012, 09:29:35 AM »

Maybe there should be an "only Extra's" forum !

de Rick wn2c
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3669




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« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2012, 08:42:18 PM »

Rick:  Why?
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WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5437




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« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2012, 04:37:07 AM »

They transmit where they are allowed to transmit, and with the modes they are allowed.  You are not thinking very international here!
There was a good reason that we used separate transmitters and receivers through the sixties and transceivers were NOT popular.  Do not assume that they must be doing it wrong because it does not conform to FCC rules or USA conventions!  Amateur radio is international in nature!
73s.

-Mike.
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1378




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« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2012, 05:22:08 PM »

They transmit where they are allowed to transmit, and with the modes they are allowed.  You are not thinking very international here!
There was a good reason that we used separate transmitters and receivers through the sixties and transceivers were NOT popular.  Do not assume that they must be doing it wrong because it does not conform to FCC rules or USA conventions!  Amateur radio is international in nature!

<smile> can we use that argument to get a 4 meter band or maybe some real parking space around 500 KHz? It would be great if the rest of the world had some 220 MHz lovin too. Maybe the equipment manufacturers would shine more favor down upon those who would like some choices.

Amateur radio has always been the unwanted stepchild for spectrum allocations no matter where you go in the world. The US has rather stringent restrictions upon 60 meters where some countries even in the same IARU region have an entire band and not a handful of channels.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
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