Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Radio Shack Corp "Suspends" Dividend. Stock Crashes  (Read 8627 times)
K0JEG
Member

Posts: 648




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2012, 05:25:37 PM »

As an armchair CEO, they should look at the British Maplin stores as a 'how to survive in electronics retailing' model:
Very similar target audience but they did not fall into the cellphone trap.


Looks a little like Fry's in the central/southern CA area. As much as I'd like them to go national, I don't think it would make sense. Besides, that'd be one less reason to visit Las Vegas!

http://frys.com/
Logged
KCJ9091
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2012, 07:39:59 PM »

The BIG slot machine!


I can only allow myself to go to the Austin store on special occasions.  Always spend too much.
Logged
KE4YOG
Member

Posts: 182




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2012, 07:45:35 PM »

The main items that we used to call "force feed" was the parts and all the other goodies in the back of the store. I made my manager and district manager when I had a local state agency buy over 2500 dollars worth of parts. The sale price was over 75% profit. One of the gentlemen that worked in the store I manged was made a millionaire by Charles Tandy. Mr. Tandy encourage the purchasing of Tandy stock. Dick was with the company for 1972 until around 2000. He managed a store for 20 years and got tired of the time it took. He had a 150,000 dollars sale on one ticket. The public schools bought computers and printers for the whole county.

I left to go work in a prison. I was tired of not being able to get time off in Oct, Nov, Dec so I could go hunting. Also going to work in a prison reduced my stress greatly. I didnt have to worry about making people happy.
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3753




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2012, 08:56:25 AM »

Quote
The sale price was over 75% profit.

YOG:  You no doubt know more than I do but my RS manager friend was upset because she was losing her shirt by being "force fed" and then RS popping a sale on these items. 

Perhaps they were slow selling items.  I have no idea.  Just sounded to me like a nasty thing to do to a store manager.
Logged
KB1WSY
Member

Posts: 718




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: July 31, 2012, 08:29:27 AM »

I am lucky enough to be a 15-minute drive away from one of the few remaining "store front" independent retail electronic component stores in my part of the world: "You-Do-It Electronics" of Needham, Massachusetts (http://www.youdoitelectronics.com/).

I buy a fair amount of stuff there, especially cables, hardware, a certain amount of components and anything that I would rather see and touch before buying: tools are the best example of this. They sell a wide range of parts, kits, and some books including the ARRL publications. They even sell vacuum tubes, albeit their selection is oriented to audiophiles! They seem to try quite hard, have knowledgeable salespeople, and the store is often quite busy especially on a Saturday. On the ground floor it's just as I described. They also have an electronic appliance/white goods store on the next floor up.

The biggest problem I see, even for a very good store such as "You-Do-It," is that the spectrum of interests among electronics hobbyists is now so wide that the store cannot possibly stock more than a fraction of the items people want to buy. In the old days, it would be, "we'll order it for you" and that made sense for the customer because it was the best way to get the gizmo. Nowadays, we just walk out and buy the item online.... Although I buy a lot of stuff at You-Do-It, it is by no means the majority of my parts purchases, because many items just aren't in stock. There's a whole display stand of resistors, and another for capacitors, and another for connectors and cables and yet it's not uncommon not to find what you are looking for. When they do have the item, I try to buy it there because I like to do my own small part to keep them in business -- even though, not surprisingly, their prices can be a bit higher than the big online stores like Mouser. There's doesn't seem to be another store like it for hundreds of miles around!

Yes, they did ask for my name and address the first time I went there but not in a pushy way. In this rare case, I was glad to give them my details and have actually found the mailers that they send me useful, including the discount coupons and so on. I got the impression that they wouldn't have been at all taken aback if I had refused to give my details.

I hesitated a bit before posting this, because it might look like a "free commercial" but I think that it does fit in the context of this thread. I have no business or family connection with the store and in fact only discovered it for the first time a few months ago.

Ironically they are only a few hundred yards away from a Radio Shack -- which doesn't seem to be posing them any problems given the sorry state of "The Shack" nowadays.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3753




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2012, 09:15:09 AM »

Martin:  You're very fortunate to have such a store in your vicinity! 

As for any mailers or discount coupons, I have received zero during the past 20 years.  I used to get a catalog but no more.  They stopped publishing those.  I used to get a mailer about 20 years ago but no more.  The only conclusion I can come to is that they use my name and address to sell.

I'm about to change that.
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 898




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2012, 10:04:18 AM »

the 70s were a great time to spend money at the Shack.  now, the only thing I need them for is mike stands.
Logged
WA8IUR
Member

Posts: 16




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2012, 12:59:19 PM »

A LITTLE OFF TOPIC, BUT I HAVE AN ARRL BOOK " SSB FOR AMATEUR RADIO"- HAS A $2.50 RADIO SHACK PRICE TAG ON IT. CIRCA 1960. 73 WA8IUR TIM
Logged
N3DF
Member

Posts: 252




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2012, 01:28:00 PM »

I always liked the brand name "Realistic."  It's not a real radio, but it certainly is realistic.  I think the last item I bought from Radio Shack was a ten meter radio two sunspot cycle peaks ago.  Before that, a TRS-80 computer. 
Logged

Neil N3DF
K0JEG
Member

Posts: 648




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: July 31, 2012, 05:32:02 PM »

They always had decent scanners too. I regularly listen to local airport chatter on my PRO-2052 I picked up cheap on closeout.
Logged
K0OD
Member

Posts: 2546




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: July 31, 2012, 09:27:47 PM »

I wonder how many TRS-80s were sold in the late 70s compared with Apples? I remember when there was a separate chain of Radio Shack Computer stores around 1980.  My company bought a TRS80 Model II which worked very nicely for handling our mailing list stored on 8" floppies.
Logged
KB1WSY
Member

Posts: 718




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: August 01, 2012, 04:09:54 AM »

In the back of my 1963 ARRL Handbook, the Radio Shack ad promotes "TOP TRADE INs on Hallicrafters Equipment!" You could turn in your "outdated" Hallicrafters and "Modernize You Station For Less Money! Trade In Your Old Equipment For Top Dollar!" It shows six Shack branded ham items, including the SX140 receiver kit for $114.95, the HT40 transmitter kit at $89.95 and HA5 VFO kit at $79.95. There's the HT37 SSB transmitter for $495.00, the HT41 Linear for $395.00 and the SX111 dual conversion receiver for $279.50. The ad lists a total of eight retail locations, all of them in New England, featuring "Radio Shack's Famous Bargain Train -- At Your Fingertips!" (I'm not sure I like the mention of "train" and "fingertips" in the same sentence but never mind.)

I still have my Model 100 "laptop" purchased in about 1984. It weighs less than 4 pounds (a real lightweight even by modern standards) and runs for dozens of hours on four AA batteries. The base model had 8K of memory. I spent more than $1,000 to upgrade the memory to a total of 32K. It has an eight-line monochrome screen and a built-in 300bps modem that worked really well, either direct wired to the phone line or with the acoustic couplers. I learned Basic and did a substantial amount of programming, mainly for fun and a little bit for work. I joined CompuServe and surfed the forums, as well as using email with the mandatory numerical email address. I used the OAG guide to do all the research before buying airline tickets. When I used the Model 100 on airplanes it was guaranteed to attract lots of attention as most people had never seen something like that before....

A few years later, I remember walking into a Radio Shack in Manhattan and buying a complete, dipole-type shortwave antenna that I then mounted on the roof of my brownstone so that I could do some SWL.

They even expanded internationally. There was a Radio Shack in the shopping mall near my parents' home in the suburbs of Paris, France, in the 1980s.

It seems to me that for the past few decades they've been desperately trying to shed their "radio" roots, even going so far as to eliminate the word "Radio" from their official name by announcing a year or two back that they would rebrand their stores as simply "The Shack." Not sure what happened to that....

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3753




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: August 01, 2012, 08:03:07 AM »

Quote
even going so far as to eliminate the word "Radio" from their official name by announcing a year or two back that they would rebrand their stores as simply "The Shack." Not sure what happened to that....


As what happens to all wet dreams, they woke up!  This is what happens when a company like Radio Shack hire executives who don't know a capacitor from a cellphone to "reorganize" the company.  They forget their roots which was the foundation of their corporation.

Instead of building on the existing foundation, they tear it down and build anew.  Then when it fails, the executives move on to another place where they can use their "expertise."
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5997




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: August 01, 2012, 08:41:38 AM »

The store KB1WSY spoke of, "You do it", is an hour drive from my home, but I visit it once every couple of months to 'stock up' on parts.  It is indeed one of the last electronics parts storefronts in existance around where you can actually see and touch what you're buying instead of relying on a picture and some vague measurements on a website.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4476




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: August 01, 2012, 08:57:48 AM »

K8AXW,

We called them 'seagull managers'. They come in, squawk lot, flap around getting in people's way, c**p over everything and evrybody and then leave  to do the same in another company - usually for more money!
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!