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Author Topic: Radio Shack Corp "Suspends" Dividend. Stock Crashes  (Read 8260 times)
KC0SHZ
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« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2012, 09:16:36 AM »

With due appologies for the people who retired with Radio shack stock in their 401K.

This couldn't have happened to a more deserving company.

A constant stream of disappointment is what I get whenever I go there.  Staff that couldn't tell coax from a resistor, stock that doesn't include things like "antennas you can talk on" (like 19.5 inch pieces of wire are that complex), and a general sense of poor quality.

When I was first licensed in 2004, the people in our local club used to laugh about playing "stump the radio shack guy".  Not anymore, because it has become so easy that laughing about it has become something akin to laughing at a disabled person.   When is the last time you went to a radio shack and had an intelligent conversation about radio with a clerk?
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KE4YOG
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« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2012, 08:37:43 PM »

AXW all I know about Radio Shack is old. The people at the top are no Charles Tandy. When I worked there they would screw you on profit margins but then it was getting people to buy batteries, charger, and such that made money. Cell phones were part of our business but not even close to the percentage it is today. I really feel sorry for people that work for Radio Shack. I see the demise of what at one time a good company. I would have to be very hungry to go back to that hell hole again. Note that I said I left to go to work in a prison and my stress was reduced.
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K0OD
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« Reply #32 on: August 02, 2012, 05:39:03 AM »

This bashing of Radio Shack employees isn't justified.

I made a lot of money in its shares from 1966 to about 1969. The company is a FABULOUS American success story with 7,000 locations around the world. Radio Shack was nimble enough to outlast virtually all of the radio suppliers from the golden age of electronics stores. The company was at the forefront of the computer revolution in the late 70s. If Eham had existed back in the 60s, I'm sure the advice would have been to stock more Collins, more Hallicrafters.

I remember when two local RS employees, just kids and making about three bucks an hour, were kidnapped from their store and murdered years ago:
http://www.topix.com/forum/city/florissant-mo/TJ7A7OS6OHUJ6P04F
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K1CJS
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« Reply #33 on: August 02, 2012, 06:29:01 AM »

The bashing of the older Radio Shack employees who actually knew what they were there for isn't justified, but thebashing of today's Radio Shack employees certainly is.  I was in one of those places just the other day and had a snot-nosed kid try to tell me what I would need to replace a cigarette lighter type power cord for a 12 volt DC powered device.  He insisted that a converter that could provide any power setting from 3 volts to 12 volts would be needed!

Almost all of the sales people there today know little more than how to take money--and not even enough to count change.  High school dropouts is putting it mildly!
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K8AXW
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« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2012, 08:20:51 AM »

RZP:  Excellent description of the fly-by-night execs!  The Brits always have a way with words.  Cheesy

I prefer not to bash the RS employees because I can understand their situation.  They're simply people that the store manager hires to clerk, work for peanuts and not use dope while working.  Nothing more. Quite often they're college kids trying to make a buck to supplement their school funds or to just make some beer money.   

The managers feel lucky to find someone that will work to start with and if they're trainable enough to learn the cash register they're tickled pink!

But..... for some reason I'm running into more and more of these so called clerks that have a snarky attitude.  Not having a technical background or even stupidity I can deal with.  Attitudes I can't.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #35 on: August 02, 2012, 10:14:53 AM »

AXW. In 32 years in my last employment, I had 19 managers. A few seagulls, a few real jerks and one who lasted for years after a criminal conviction.......
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W7ASA
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« Reply #36 on: August 04, 2012, 12:03:45 PM »

RZP - sounds like a city north of here: Washington D.C.  Roll Eyes

---

I live on a rather isolated peninsula and that ONLY place for electronic conponents of any kind is Radio Shack.  However, it's almost like having an apendix on a human: It's there, but nobody is quite certain why.  They are nice, but always mystified when I sort through various bits until I find what I can from their store.  Whenever I have time and enough of an order, I otherwise order everything on line from the usual vendors in the USA.


 
73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._
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KH6DC
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« Reply #37 on: August 04, 2012, 09:27:49 PM »

I still go to Radio Shack for parts I need now, if they carry them.

73, Delwyn KH6DC
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
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« Reply #38 on: August 04, 2012, 11:57:07 PM »

Radio Shack was a worldwide player back 20 years ago, but now they are dropping down worldwide.
In other countries they have been replaced by other newly established companies, which have as their business model servicing a trade/hobbyist niche market.
Like many other companies RS was entranced by the lure of cellphone sales and consumer electronics.
Unfortunately for them they could never compete in this area with the big guns, and they were doomed to failure in this area.
In the area of computer parts and accessories, they can be obtained more cheaply from any number of independent small computer stores.

So RS is just another example of a business which is slowly dying due to the march of technology.
I doubt they could have done much to mitigate this, in the same way as many other market extinctions.
The TV repairman, computer chip level repair guy, and in some areas the computer repair guy as well, are all examples of this trend.

As regards employees - it is the responsibility of the business to hire and train appropriate people.
Unless you are a stock speculator the people in your business will either make or break your business.
Unfortunately, businessmen, being typical shopkeepers, count wages as a thing to be minimized, not used to lure good people.
So, if you pay peanuts - you get monkeys.

Henry Ford understood that if you continually reduce or suppress wages then you are impoverishing the very people you expect to buy your product.
Accordingly he paid his workers more than other manufacturers - who scolded him, until he said he wanted his workers to be able to afford his cars.

Like a farmer who takes crops without ever fertilising the soil, the day comes when he has no crop.
Many businesses express surprise or blame others, when they fail - when collectively they are to blame for their own demise.
I was in a high tech company which respected employees, and who would work long hours voluntarily because of this attitude.
When a new management team came in, they changed this culture to one of rigid discipline - and the free hours of work stopped.
Their costs rose, and moral dropped - and the company became a hostile workplace - due only to the loss of respect for employees.

In soviet times, they realised that fear and economic control only produced mediocre bureaucratic behaviour, and productivity was pitiful.
Consequently, they adopted the "Stakhanovite" movement.
This stressed competition for best results, increasing wages, placing the right people in jobs and public recognition of outstanding workers.
This was more successful than all the labor camps or intimidation at raising productivity.
In fact this was the normal pattern of capitalist companies in other countries - a meritocracy.

However, it seems that many western capitalist countries have now adopted more soviet style failed policies - with similar results.
I suspect that RS will not be the last of many struggling companies.

73 - Rob
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W5DQ
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« Reply #39 on: August 09, 2012, 11:02:51 AM »

Our local 'Rat Shack' died an ugly death several years ago. The guy who owned the franchise store wanted to retire and tried to sell it but wanted a king's ransom for it. When he finally decided to close the doors, the fire sale started and I ended up buy a ton of the 'parts' section for pennies on the dollar. From my gleanings, I now provide parts for many in the local ham community out here the sand and rocks we call home in the high Mojave Desert.

The closest current Radio Shack 'cell phone emporium' is appx 90 miles away. Sad thing is I don't run a store at all and I have nearly as much parts inventory that they do Sad I worked for the Heathkit store in Dallas, TX while going to college back in the late 70's. While we had a different main product line (ours was kits, theirs was finished goods), we looked at Radio Shack as one of the main competitors selling parts back then. Time have changes and both chains are either gone or almost gone.

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
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« Reply #40 on: August 09, 2012, 03:40:00 PM »

Our local 'Rat Shack' died an ugly death several years ago. The guy who owned the franchise store wanted to retire and tried to sell it but wanted a king's ransom for it. When he finally decided to close the doors, the fire sale started and I ended up buy a ton of the 'parts' section for pennies on the dollar. From my gleanings, I now provide parts for many in the local ham community out here the sand and rocks we call home in the high Mojave Desert.

The closest current Radio Shack 'cell phone emporium' is appx 90 miles away. Sad thing is I don't run a store at all and I have nearly as much parts inventory that they do Sad I worked for the Heathkit store in Dallas, TX while going to college back in the late 70's. While we had a different main product line (ours was kits, theirs was finished goods), we looked at Radio Shack as one of the main competitors selling parts back then. Time have changes and both chains are either gone or almost gone.

Gene W5DQ

Yes Gene, I found a pile of RS stuff in a charity shop of all places.
I bought their whole inventory - a win for them and myself.
I can imagine you are a popular guy in your ham community.

73 - Rob
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W5DQ
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« Reply #41 on: August 09, 2012, 04:27:05 PM »

Not as popular as one might expect. I don't get many calls for parts as many of our locals are of the 2M FM crown and don't know which end of a soldering iron is hot. The few that do need and use parts have lots of their own and once in a while call to see what I have. I usually just 'trade/sell' the harder to get parts or hand out common parts when called for.

On the positive side of all the parts I hoard, there is a local young ham who is 17 yo, been licensed for only 2 years, now has his Extra, received his Mixed DXCC award 1 year to the day after his FIRST DX contact, has taken 1st place in more than one DX contest as a Rookie and against the pack for our ARRL Section and he now has nearly 150 confirmed, kid is a DX dynamo (with a sister, 15 yo, who is hot on his heels and just passed her General and Mom and Dad are both hams too). He has taken to homebrewing like a duck to water and I recently gave him a large box crammed full of odd this and that parts that I had gotten from RS and other sources and didn't feel like sorting out. I really like to see the kids get into the homebrew and technical side of ham radio too and this kid puts lots of us old timers to task to keep up. And he hasn't even graduated high school yet. Plans to go to college and get a EE degree. I told him go to MIT or the likes. He has the brains for it.


Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
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« Reply #42 on: August 09, 2012, 04:46:44 PM »

I understand about the FM crowd - that's why I mainly stick to H.F.

Sounds like the kid (and his sister) are on a good life path.
Like most things of value they are rare.
Engineers and Scientists are what advance society, so we need as many as we can get.
Those professions are problem solvers, while many others are problem makers!

Anyway, you seem to be a good elmer Gene.

73 - Rob
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K1CJS
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« Reply #43 on: August 10, 2012, 04:44:47 AM »

I've seen quite a few Radio Shack blister packs in a local inventory closeout/buyout store in my area as well.  The funny part of it is that some of those closeout/buyout items were cellphone accessories and toys.  I didn't find any parts or other RS items--although I won't say there weren't any.  Another hobbiest may have gotten to them first!
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WA4FNG
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« Reply #44 on: August 18, 2012, 07:15:43 PM »

In Atlanta we're lucky to have several Fry's Electronics stores. Who needs to visit a Radio Shack? It is a shame. My first job as a teenager was working at a strore called Parts Unlimited. Very much like a RS store but carried very high end hi-fi gear. I think they were a franchise operation. I swept up the store and worked back in the TV repair shop on the weekends. Also helped with TV antenna installs. That was a big deal back in the 60s.
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