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Author Topic: Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em...  (Read 440 times)
G0RIF
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Posts: 129




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« on: October 04, 2007, 07:11:20 AM »


An interesting article on the BBC website today...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7026637.stm

73, Dean - G0RIF
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KE3WD
Member

Posts: 5689




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« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2007, 10:07:30 AM »

But if you play or sing the staff music presented there, it does not rhythmically sound like CW at all.  

I think the composer may have consulted a Morse table to come up with this, but really didn't have a clue as to proper Morse timing, etc. or he would have placed things differently.  The "rhythm of the code" is so important to copy.  Nobody who really knows the code would ever think that anyone could copy the hidden message from what is written there, that would be more of a pencil and paper "decoding" -- which obviates the use of Morse, the one digital code that can be translated using nothing more than the two holes on either side of the head and the stuff in between.  


But it does represent a creative mind seeking ways to create.  

I've played around with various musical themes and CW over the years, too, but have the resource of actually knowing and using the code behind it.  Sometimes it is amazing how the Morse can be hidden, rhythmically correct, by simply implying the frequency changes known as melody to the thing.  Even commonly used short Morse abbreviations and the like can escape the ear of seasoned CW operators once the pitches are implied.  I will still use a CW rhythm to iterate jazz improvisations inside a tune from time to time.  Even when told to look for 'em, some of my 40WPM and better friends can't often find them.  "QSO" spread out over the scale can sound completely alien, even though it is still rhythmically correct.  


Thanks for posting that,


KE3WD
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WQ3T
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Posts: 209




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« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2007, 12:40:19 PM »

I copied either STGN or VMG, then 5AHTUM.
Proper spacing is critical for morse code interpretation. I have worked guys with fists so bad I couldn't copy. All I can do is say 73 at that point.
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2825




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« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2007, 07:17:30 AM »

Several years ago, for the 200th birthday of the city of Bremerton WA, the Bremerton Symphony commissioned a short musical tribute to the city.  It started with an American Indian - type of sound, went through a couple Scandanavian folk tunes and such, and then Navy-type themes (large Naval Shipyard here in B'ton).

To underscore things, he wrote a solo for the oboe which, although the principal oboist played it perfectly as written, was a total mystery.  The composer, who knew I'm a ham, saw the curious look on my face and asked what was wrong.  I told him that it sounded like Morse code but the timing was all wrong.  It was supposed to say "BREMERTON 200", but there's no way you can write that in any time signature or signatures and make it work.  We finally determined that we'd use our keyboard synthesizer and I'd send it by hand.  There were several retired Radiomen in the audience (and other hams), and they appreciated the piece more than most of the rest.

www.symphonic.org

73
Pat K7KBN
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
VA7CPC
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Posts: 2406




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« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2007, 06:54:32 PM »

I once made up a set of "paddle exercises" -- sequences of strongly-syncopated dits and dahs, _with correct spacing_, that repeated in 16-beat patterns.  Once you understand that one dah (and its terminating silence) is the same length as two dits (and their terminating silence), everything works out beautifully.

But I decided that only musicians who knew CW would be interested -- not a big audience.<g>  I don't know if I still have them around.

They fitted right in with my playing bells in a samba band.  And they were handy in developing paddle coordination.

    Charles
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KE3WD
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Posts: 5689




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« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2007, 04:51:08 PM »

That's interesting, I was always under the impression that proper spacing was three dits equals one dah, not two.  

Musically speaking, you are talking "straight" duple subdivision and I'm talking "swing" feel where the 8ths are played in a syncopation off of the triplet, "doo-bee doo-bee" -- which we do not do when sending morse in either case.  





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N3QE
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Posts: 2347




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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2007, 12:34:26 PM »

I'm pretty sure that at least some pop music has Morse code embedded in it.

I seem to recall Alan Parson's Eve having a repeated "dit    dit-dit-dit-dah    dit" beat.
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