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Author Topic: totally new station  (Read 6166 times)
WB4SPT
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Posts: 135




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« on: July 28, 2012, 10:53:20 AM »

So new, I haven't built it yet Grin
I'm moving, after over 50 years in Florida TO NY.  My family and I are buying one of those popular stick houses with this thing called a basement. I've got a drake line that will reside in one of the rooms of this, to us, huge house.  THe family generally hates the sound of ssb, so i'm supposing the shack will be in the basement. It's not a walk out basement, but it is finished.  THere is one room that has a door, but it is a tomb.  not even a transom window.  I think i can deal with AC power ok, since there is a suspended ceiling that can be worked around to run NM house wire.   How do basement installs get the antenna cables outside?  THe other issue is trying to dig a 4' x 4' x 6' hole in this cementous stuff they call clay, but that will be the subject of a different thread.
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K9KJM
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2012, 08:50:20 PM »

A neat way to get coax, Ground wires, etc inside is to just install a clothes Dryer Vent.   Kits are available for about 5 bucks at most home supply type stores.  Some of them rent out the 4 inch hole saw needed to install it.

(Dryer vents provide plenty of space for future coax etc, AND do not look out of place on a home.)

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WB4IUY
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2012, 06:31:26 AM »

Question, what type of tower are planning to put up? I'm assuming that's what the hole is you're talking about digging. If it is a tower, do you have room for guy wires, or is it going to be free standing?

Dave WB4IUY
www.WB4IUY.net
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WB4SPT
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2012, 06:48:35 AM »

I'm on about .9 acres, but its in a neighborhood that has zero fences, zero antennas save maybe two small TV dishes.  I'm considering a self supporting 40' that has each piece bolted together (AN Wireless).  THe idea of guys on a tower in this Stepford wifes neighborhood won't fly.  Not even sure that a hexbeam tied to the chimney will fly. It's going to be interesting to see their reaction.  Codes allow up to 62', single tower here.  My question about the basement really pertains to getting cable out of a underground bunker (basement), where water/dirt penetration needs to be minimized.  It's CMU, so I'm thinking cables just run vertical until I can shoot outside in the clear. 
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KB2WIG
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2012, 09:44:38 AM »

Being you have a suspended ceiling you probably can get outside through the wall. And as mentioned, adding a dryer vent works well....

If you can put up a tower, put one up. Make yourself happy. When the neighbors pay your bills, then let them decide what you should do with your life.

Get a dehumidifier for your stuff. And if you don't have a toilet, a plastic jug.

"The family generally hates the sound of ssb"

There is such a thing as AM. And you can find it in NY.


klc
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WB4SPT
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« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2012, 06:51:31 PM »

Kevin, i like ur style.   Grin   do you have more than the 10m aerial?   We could talk someday on 75, if/when they let me put up a wire...
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KB2WIG
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2012, 07:24:10 AM »

D,

Yes, I get on 75 from time to time.

The closeline dipole.....  that came about when we got this home. The previous owners had a home brew line between the two posts. I got some zip cord, split it and fastened it to the line. I ran the feedline to a basement window, drilled a 5/8 hole upwards through the sill plate, and fed the coax to my future operating area across the basement. The total time expended was about 20 minutes. I just wanted to get on the air asap. It works 'well'; Albert, xf3pas got a laugh out of it and gave me a 57. Not to bad for 20 watts on 10M AM.

I did break a few rules; there is no direct ground where the feedline comes into the house. What you can't see too well is the hill that begins to the right of the antenna. The hill, the house to the left on the antenna, and the fact the dipole is really close to the ground, probably protects the station equipments. Or so I hope. It has for the last 4 years.The other stuff feeding the shack all comes in at the same place and is only about 20 feet from the 'lectrical entrance, where it is bonded.

Ruffely , where will u b moving to??

klc

klc
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K3GM
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2012, 09:40:17 AM »

......How do basement installs get the antenna cables outside?.....

Depending on the age of the dwelling you're moving to, it could have standard 12" poured concrete basement walls which extend above grade as mine do.  In the rear of the house they extend up to 5' above grade.  I hired a concrete coring company to cut an 8 inch hole thru the wall.  I placed an aluminum plate over the hole which contains my Polyphaser bulkhead connectors for the various transmission lines coming in from the antennas.  I was left with the core so I have the option of grouting it back in place some day when if I ever move.  A well spent $300.00 I would say.  Here's a picture of the hole from the inside:
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a96/TwoSevenRight/P1020459.jpg
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WB4SPT
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2012, 05:12:39 PM »

Now, that 8" hole thru the grouted CMU is a fire proof penetration, i'll say.  I'm headed for just south of rochester.  THe house is pretty high on a clay hill, but i'm going to find out how much of the block is exposed on the exterior, near the tomb.  So, i've got the big four figured out, doored room, toilet, outside wall, and electrical access.  The rest is just details. 
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N4KZ
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« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2012, 11:04:34 AM »

My home has a concrete block foundation and basement. I rented a hammer drill and drilled out a 4 inch hole in the block in which to run PVC for cables. I thought drilling would be difficult but it was a snap.

73
N4KZ
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VE3FMC
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2012, 12:32:05 PM »

I have a small window in my shack. So what I did was replaced one pane of glass with plexiglass. I have barrel connectors mounted in holes in the plexiglass. The connectors are the type with two nuts on them.

I also have drilled numerous holes through that plexiglass over the past 20 years. My satelite TV cables run through it, ground wire, rotor cables etc. I just silicone around the coax and wires to seal it up.
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NI0Z
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« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2012, 10:08:39 AM »

You may look near the water main.  I was lucky and was able to put my shack in the basement right by it.  By doing so I ws able to drill a hole in the house side above the basement and use the same passage as the water main ( typically the water main has ect space around it ) to feed my coax down into the basement.  Because the water main has a pop off panel I was able to grab the cable and create a new hole for it to run to the radios.  I have a finished box outside on the side of the house.  See my site for station updates and RoaringStaR v 1.0 for some pics of the box.  An added bonus was being able to use the water main as a ground also until I got my own rods sunk.  The last step will be to put a box inside on the wall to finish up the install and make it look all professional.  I may have to move my station one floor up which is why I have held off on the final box. Fortunately it would be exactly above where it's at now so the entry to the house won't have to change.
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K3GM
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« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2012, 07:20:29 PM »

Now, that 8" hole thru the grouted CMU is a fire proof penetration, i'll say.......

If it was wide open, I'd certainly agree. But with the bulkhead plate on the outside, it's totally sealed.  This method also allows me to mount the Polyphasers on the inside surface of the plate and out of the weather.  Note the two 4AWG ground wires at the lower left corner of the plate.  One comes in from the towers while the second one exits towards the utility service ground rod.  Additional rods are situated along the path of the underground wire.
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a96/TwoSevenRight/71e5dcb0.jpg
« Last Edit: August 03, 2012, 07:45:14 PM by K3GM » Logged
AA4PB
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« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2012, 06:42:41 AM »

Why do you need a fireproof penetration to the outside? Inside to garage - yes. Between connected buildings - yes.

Rather than a dryer vent, consider an "LB" box from an electrical supplier. Easier to seal against water and bugs. Easy access with a removable cover. Cables exit to the bottom so no chance of water following cables into the box. Available in PVC or aluminum.

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WB4SPT
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« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2012, 01:31:38 PM »

Why do you need a fireproof penetration to the outside? Inside to garage - yes. Between connected buildings - yes.




Just to keep lightning energized antenna cables away from wood, is what I am thinking.  Grounded or not, I treat antenna coax like a unfused power wire. 
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