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Author Topic: GREASING JOINTS IN ALUMINUM TUBING  (Read 1182 times)
K7NSW
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Posts: 59




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« on: July 28, 2012, 04:04:16 PM »

Am ready to assemble new GAP vertical - 45 foot tall Voyager.  There are several slip-together joints in the aluminum tubing.  Tubes are NOT slotted with ss clamps.  They slide together and held in place with ss self-threading sheet metal screws.  Do I assemble the joints dry or use some kind of electrolytic grease/lubricant?  If I put something on/in the joints, what do you suggest and where do I get it?  I suspect this is a regular question.  I looked in the first 12 pages of this forum and did not see this topic.  This is my second Voyager.  I put the first one together dry and it served me faithfully for many years.  It came apart without much fuss.  So, what do you think: dry or lubricated joints?  Many thanks for your replies.
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N4NOO
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Posts: 106




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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2012, 04:37:51 PM »

I would use something like Bostik "Never-Seez " a conductive "non-stick" lube. It has aluminum powder, copper powder and graphite in a grease base.  I have used this on several antennas and have always had success. I even use it at the balun to element connection for conductivity. PS, a little goes a long way.
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13477




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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2012, 05:07:58 PM »

While I'm a big fan of Nevr-Seez, it isn't designed for electrical work (though it probably
would still work.)  It's certainly good for stainless steel screws in threaded aluminum holes.

For tubing I use Ox-Gard, which is sold in the electrical supply sections of most Home
Improvement stores.  A similar product is NoAlOx.  Both are designed to avoid corrosion
on aluminum wiring.  A small tube is less than $10 and will last for many antennas.

How necessary it is depends on a number of factors, particularly your climate.  After
a few years in a foggy climate I couldn't get the radiator of my IsoPole apart.  In a dry
environment it may not be necessary.


Remember that aluminum oxide is a very good insulator.
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KB8UUZ
Member

Posts: 38




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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2012, 07:42:23 PM »

Pentrox A is made to maintain electrical conductivity and prevent corrosion between aluminum elements (tubes).
See DX Engineering: http://www.dxengineering.com/parts/dxe-p8a
It can get messy when you put it on. Light coat all around where the two parts meet , but after a years of being there, the aluminum hangs in there.

Tom, KB8UUZ
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KF6A
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Posts: 214




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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2012, 09:12:12 PM »

Home Depot should have some noalox.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2450




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« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2012, 11:59:31 PM »

I've used GB Oxgard from the hardware store for ages.  It is conductive and has zinc powder in a petroleum base.   
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