Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Bud RF Amplifier  (Read 3284 times)
K0HML
Member

Posts: 35




Ignore
« on: August 08, 2012, 10:44:33 AM »

I have acquired an old Bud amplifier that appears to have been a kit.  It's a push-pull circuit and, although the tubes are missing, I 'm guessing it used a pair of 811A's.  Anybody have any recollection of such a critter?

Ralph Bolt, K0HML
Logged
AC5UP
Member

Posts: 3835




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2012, 11:05:28 AM »

Long ago and far away Bud Industries marketed a complete line of enclosure and chassis blanks which the avid hobbyist could machine as needed into the homebrew device of their dreams... They were called "Bud Boxes" and I can't help but wonder if what you have is a DIY amplifier built on a Bud Box.

Check the company logo on this web site against what you have:   http://www.budind.com/
Logged

Never change a password on a Friday                
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 896




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2012, 12:09:53 PM »

Bud, like Stancor, did once produce some simple amateur products, either kit or assembled.  I'm pretty sure Bud made a parlor transmitter, which you could use to broadcast your own audio through the house, back in the black-crackle-is-pretty days.
Logged
KA5N
Member

Posts: 4380




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2012, 12:45:29 PM »

I should be obivious whether an amplifier is an audio amp or an RF amp.

If you are an ARRL member you can look through the ads in old QST's (1930's-1950's for
various BUD products (of pictures of old ham shacks and equipment) online.

It should be pretty easy to tell if the amp is comerical or home brew (although some old
timers were really good craftmen).

Hope you found a prize.
Allen KA5N
Logged
K0HML
Member

Posts: 35




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2012, 03:11:25 PM »

Oh, it's definitely an RF amp.  It has the original 80-meter tank coil with a swing link and what is probably an 80-meter input coil.  After additional research, I'm thinking it was a kit.  The chassis mechanics are much too elaborate for a total home-brew.  I've emailed Bud industries and hope for some response.

Ralph, K0HML
Logged
W9GB
Member

Posts: 2616




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2012, 06:12:59 PM »

In the early 1980's, Hammond R.F. linear amplifiers for Amateur (Ham) Radio were produced.
http://www.hammondmfg.com/claspg.htm

Naturally tube type, built for continuous duty, powered by Hammond "iron" & housed in Hammond enclosures.
Hammond stopped production over 25 years ago. Even now folks are still asking about them (many are still in active use today).

Two versions of two different models were produced:
The HL-2000 (later became the HL-2000A - link to full data page) using two 3-500Z tubes.
The HL-1000 (later became the HL-1000A) using a single 3-500Z tube - designed to be a more economical version of the more powerful HL-2000A.

Offered with this series of R.F. amplifiers in the 1980's, were high power antenna tuners the AT-1500 & 2KW low pass R.F. filters (HF-1000LP)...

In the 1960's, Hammond sporadically offered the HL-500, HL-700 and HL-750 linear amplifiers too. They used quad 811-A output tubes. Not only using Hammond "iron", RF chokes and enclosures BUT also using their then available, air variable condensers (PDF - 239K).
Very little data on these amplifier models has survived...
Logged
W8JI
Member

Posts: 9304


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2012, 09:55:09 AM »

I have acquired an old Bud amplifier that appears to have been a kit.  It's a push-pull circuit and, although the tubes are missing, I 'm guessing it used a pair of 811A's.  Anybody have any recollection of such a critter?

Ralph Bolt, K0HML

My former friend W8IOB (now sk), was a Bud Radio engineer and manager for many years. I can assure you 100% Bud made many amateur radio products as well as audio products, because John had some in his office.

Besides the various Bud equipment in John's office and on display in the hallway at work, as a youth I owned a push-pull Bud amplifier with 812 tubes.

 
Logged
KB1WSY
Member

Posts: 715




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2012, 10:18:46 AM »

If you go to eBay and type in "Bud Amplifier" you'll see one there. The logo underneath the chassis says "Bud Radio" plus an illegible name of a town -- is this is the same as the company that made (and still makes) the chassis and hardware line? BTW I have been using Bud chassis in my homebrew projects and it is a company that shows great continuity. Even the part numbers are unchanged from the 1950s, so that the part specified in the 1950s ARRL construction projects can still be ordered with the same part number 60 years later. There are a few other companies like that: H.H. Smith has now changed its name to Abbatron but its terminal strips and connectors are still available with the same 1950s part numbers. Same thing with Keystone Electronics. I find that amazing, and impressive -- also extremely helpful if the item in question is not actually pictured or adequately described in the original ARRL instructions, but merely listed as a part number.

A note for those who might be reading this thread a few days from now: the eBay auction I saw only runs for another day or so, therefore that "Bud Amplifier" will have disappeared from the auction site within the next day or two.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 896




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2012, 10:25:45 AM »

that one looks like audio with all the electrolytics under the hood.
Logged
KB1WSY
Member

Posts: 715




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2012, 10:51:25 AM »

Yes I agree it's audio. (It was the "Bud Radio" logo that intrigued me though. I was wondering whether there were two Buds, the chassis maker and another one called "Bud Radio.")

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 896




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2012, 12:30:39 PM »

nope, it was always Bud Radio Co.  I think nowadays the chassis group is called Bud Products.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!