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Author Topic: 6 meter ssb QRP  (Read 5481 times)
N0SOY
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Posts: 72




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« on: August 10, 2012, 08:34:49 PM »

Has anyone had any luck doing QRP on 6 meter.  I am thinking of getting a 12 watt ssb transciever and using a roof mounted mag mount vertical on my truck.  I thought it would be fun to have a mobile shack and try it.  6meter is interesting because of the ability to use the radio to monitor solar activity more so then most HF bands. 

I already have a 40 meter and It will be on the air as soon as I figure an antenna solution.  (maybe this weekend  Cheesy Cheesy)

Thanks
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KB1GMX
Member

Posts: 815




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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2012, 01:27:35 PM »

I have both home and mobile.  here's my take after over a decade on 6M SSB.

Home, during good Es season and with a 3 element beam or larger at good height
it's fairly effective at 10W (and less).  However you will find that 100W does enhance the
ground wave coverage considerably when there is no Es or other propagation.

Mobile, for SSB the antenna has to be horizontal polarized or you take a huge hit
for local work and will suffer with higher noise levels.  This means a halo or squareloop
typically.  At 10-12W your range will be poor for local work though from hilltops it's plenty.
Again you will want about 100W and the 10W can easily get you to 160-200W with a
small solid state amp.  

This says nothing is a must but for best results horizontal polarization. More power
(100W level) can help greatly when things are getting hot and heavy or really weak.
A good stable radio with a decent ability to tune to a specific frequency (MFJ not!)
and stable in the mobile with hot and cold plus vibration.  A noise blanker is a must
and local power lines when traveling can run the gamut from quiet to horrific.

For my mobile I run a homebrew that is stable and easy to tune while mobile and
puts out 4W (that what the bird says when I whistle!) for a lot of fun and a 6M HB
brick for 65w when things are tough. The antenna is a KU4AB square loop well tuned
mounted in the bed of the Tacoma Pickup at about 7ft off the ground.

Be prepared to listen to a lot of noise and little else but if you hear people
talking to them is often a problem of being heard over the stronger stations
more so than actually being heard.

From the mobile, 14 countries including Europe, more than 20 states, and quite a few
extended QSOs while rolling along to 0, 8, 9 ,4 and 3 landers.  My best local QSO is
NY border to eastern MA to check in to the Sunday morning YSSB net while cruising
back to MA on I84.


Allison

« Last Edit: August 11, 2012, 01:30:28 PM by KB1GMX » Logged
K5LXP
Member

Posts: 4522


WWW

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« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2012, 07:24:41 AM »

My first 6M SSB rig was an MFJ9406, and I worked well over 100 grids with that, even Hawaii over the course of a few E seasons.  A beam really helps but even a dipole in the clear will net you a lot of contacts with low power.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM
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W9ALD
Member

Posts: 26




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« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2012, 05:41:17 AM »

I have a six meter WAS Certificate on my wall using 12 watts PEP and a dipole thumbtacked to the ceiling joists of my basement.

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WB0FDJ
Member

Posts: 149




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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2012, 02:47:07 PM »

7/31/2008 1730Z My first (ever) contact on 6 meters, SSB my report 5x2 in EM89 (I'm in EN33)
FT817ND 5 watts. Antenna: Slinky dipole held in place overhead in shack with short coax.

Three days later worked Maine, FN44 on CW with same setup.

73 Doc WB0FDJ
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K4YZ
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Posts: 26


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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2012, 01:01:36 AM »

I used a Ten Tec 6-to10 meter transverter on a Yaesu FT-757GXII. Eight watts out to a small hand rotatable dipole got me solidly into New England, southern Texas and Mexico.  I sold it in a fit of "shack cleaning", but wish I had it back!

73

Steve, K4YZ
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KB1GMX
Member

Posts: 815




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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2012, 06:16:19 PM »

'YZ,

I kept my TT1208 (20m to 6m) as it's handy!  Mine does about 10W.  I still use it
with a home brewed 20M SSB rig as a backup for 6M or out in the wild when I
want 20 and 6 with me.

ITs a good way to get on 6M if you can find one and mine has a very good
front end.

Allison
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W5DQ
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Posts: 1209


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« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2012, 04:54:34 PM »

On 6M, I have a TS2000/X usually barefoot @ 100W but can drive a King Conversion SB-220 for 1200w PEP max on SSB, into a 7 element M2 6M7JHV at 40 feet. If I can hear them, I can work them. I have tried the mobile with a magmount vertical and was a waste of time and effort. Going horizontal is the only smart way to work mobile on 6M and higher for SSB work.

While I know I'll get lambasted for say so, but QRP is only fun for the guy running QRP. The other end has to do most of the work in pulling a really weak signal out of the noise. I'd rather 100W and make it fun on both ends. Having said that, I have run QRP many times in the past when the band conditions allowed it. I'm just not a 'QRP 4 ever' operator.

Gene W5DQ
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Gene W5DQ
Ridgecrest, CA - DM15dp
www.radioroom.org
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