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Author Topic: Tube collection from Silent Key  (Read 3814 times)
KQ6Q
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Posts: 968




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« on: August 09, 2012, 08:07:08 PM »

My next door neighbor's Dad passed away, and the equipment is already gone, but I've got a bushel of spare tubes to help find new homes for. located near Long Beach, CA. one each - 4x150A, 4-400A, 4E27A, 4-65A, 2C39A, 811A. 5814A,2E26 (several), 6146 (several,plain, not A,B or W) lots of - 7 and 9 pin miniatures, for 50's through 80's era,some octal and loctal. Email KQ6Q at arrl.net for list. Local sale/Pick up preferred. Would consider selling the lot. Will use the USPS 'if it fits it ships box' and lots of foam for  groups of small tubes. Not tested, but intact.  decorator items - one 811A and one 4-250 with loose pieces inside the glass. email me with what you need, and I'll let you know if I have it, and new in box or loose.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2012, 08:53:56 AM »

You didn't mention if the tubes were in their original boxes or simply loose in that bushel you mentioned. 

Since you're not getting a response here, perhaps you could contact one of the ham NOS tube vendors that go to hamfests.
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AC5UP
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2012, 09:56:40 AM »

A few years back I was thinking about selling off the tube stash. Put out a few e-mails to web vendors and found very little interest. What they'd like to do is cherry pick from a list then pay next to nothing for NOS & NIB items with a 30 day right of refusal. In other words, I send what they want and within 30 days they have the option of buying or returning the goods after they've eyeballed 'em.

I understand why a buyer needs to cover their assets 'cuz some folks tend to exaggerate and small signal tubes give little indication of how many hours are on their clock, but at the time this struck me as being entirely one sided in favor of the buyer. I'm to assume they're 100% honest while they assume I'm selling junk until proven otherwise. For all I know that's what it takes to stay in the tube biz because every day another boatanker hits the dumpster and will never need another tube, but one place in particular was offering $1.00 each for a brand-du-jour NOS 6CA7 they were selling for $12.95................

That struck me as being worthy of a middle finger salute.   Both hands.   Angry
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KB1WSY
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« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2012, 10:26:21 AM »

I read somewhere that there has been an enormous *surplus* of electron tubes starting in the mid-1960s and carrying over until today.

Supposedly, the big manufacturers greatly under-estimated how fast electronics would go solid-state, despite last-ditch attempts like the Nuvistor and the Compactron.

I've been buying tubes (receiving types, low power transmitting types, and rectifying types) for pending homebrew projects and am struck by how abundant and cheap they are, compared to other, much rarer types of vintage component. Many tubes are just a few dollars each -- probably dramatically cheaper than they were 50 years ago, on an inflation-adjusted basis. Furthermore there is a great variety of provenance including NOS; used but tested; and brand new from Russian or Chinese manufacturers.

Admittedly there are types of tube that are indeed rare ... at the high-power end of the transmitting range and "vintage" audio tubes from now-prestigious marques such as Mullard or GEC that are favored by audiophiles.

But other than that it looks like a buyer's market to me. 

Am I right? Or wrong?

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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G3RZP
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« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2012, 01:40:34 PM »

People tell me they are throwing a box of tubes away. I say that I'll take it from them. And then they sit there for 2 or 3 years and then there's a guy wants some of them.

So I paid nothing for them - and the guy who needs them is expected to pay me the postage and packing. To be honest, some do, because I despatch the tubes and tell them how much the p&p is - I don't look to make a profit on things I paid nothing for. In about 10% of cases, I never hear any more from them.....despite an email saying the tubes have been despatched. One or two get really pi**ed off the next time they want a tube and get told where to go stick their heads!

But some send me the post and packing costs and then make a generous donation to a suitable charity.....for mil type tubes, a mil veteran charity.

Life is not totally full of a****les.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2012, 05:46:17 PM »

Ok.... poor suggestion!  The only time I disposed of a load of tubes (NIB) was at a hamfest.  When it was learned that I had this load of tubes for sale, I was swamped with buyers!  The first guy that had the money bought them all.  He wanted to cherry pick at first but I nipped that in the bud telling him, all or none.

But.... that was a few years ago.  :-(
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KQ6Q
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« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2012, 12:50:49 PM »

Thanks for all the comments! Many of the tubes are NIB, but some of the boxes are getting old! I did an inventory of those that are boxed, but there is another group that are loose. I have had one email inquiry about 6146's, will see just how many I've got, NIB or not, (not a lot, 5 or less) and quote a shipped/insured price. Will visit the TRW swapmeet in October (my 4th Saturdays are booked in August and Sept) with whatever's left by then.
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AD4U
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« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2012, 01:23:52 PM »

As an avid tube type boat anchor guy, I recently bought out the entire tube inventory of a local Zenith dealer who had been in business since 1946.  I got almost a pickup  truck load of tubes.  I can use some of them in my radios, but most are TV specific and of little value to radio guys.  All are in the original boxes.

I know that some people collect and restore vintage tube type TV's and I have offered the TV specific tubes to them, but nobody seems to be interested.

Go figure.  At least I have a place to store them. 

Dick AD4U
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KQ6Q
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« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2012, 09:19:42 AM »

Dick - that's an awesome load of tubes. With the demise of over the air analog TV, there's less incentive for collectors to restore old TV's - at least old tube ham gear can still be used on the air.
Have you tried to catalog the various types in the collection ? I discovered in the much smaller sample I'm working with that there are some 6nnn tubes that are high-end equivalents of 6xxNN and 12xxNN types.
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W8JI
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« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2012, 05:44:05 AM »


I like people who write long white papers about neutralization drift and incompatibility between 6146 generations. They help fill the market with thousands of drifty-neutralization 6146 flavors that will work fine in every radio I have, and because the paper says they can't work they cost less.   :-)

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G3RZP
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« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2012, 05:47:40 AM »

Tom,

it does appear that some Motorola and some Collins transmitters were sensitive to which generation of 6146. I've never had a tx that was, though, and certainly none of the ones I designed were - except that substituting for the B version needed the drive cutting back to stay within ratings on RTTY.
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AD4U
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« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2012, 06:14:02 AM »

I recently put a set of JAN 6146W tubes in my Collins 32S3.  According to what I have read, they are not supposed to work.  They neutralized OK, they are stable, power output is up to spec, and I cannot detect any unusual spurs on my HP 141T.  So far so good.

Dick  AD4U
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W5JO
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Posts: 59




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« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2012, 07:01:35 AM »

  They neutralized OK, they are stable, power output is up to spec, and I cannot detect any unusual spurs on my HP 141T. 
Dick  AD4U

This line is the key to any final amp tube replacement.  Any time you change finals, no matter the designation, you should neutralize them.  If I recall correctly the problem the Collins transmitters experienced could be fixed by changing or adding to the neutralizing cap. 
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KA5N
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Posts: 4380




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« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2012, 08:27:52 AM »

As far as restoring old TV's, only a few like the Phico Predicta and some of the very early
projection Tv's and the early RCA's and perhaps a Muntz or other rare brand are worth the
effort.  There are many signal sources besides off the air transmissions.  VCR's, DVD's,
and convertors (off air to analog).   The biggest problem would be a source of flyback
transformers and yokes.  These have a habit of burning up and are usually custom built for
each TV.  The older sets are far easier to repair than newer sets.  As they have power
transformers and straight forward circuits.  The odd voltage sweep tubes are hard to find.
Having worked my way through college fixing TV sets, I have very little love for the notion
of restoring them.
Allen KA5N
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KB1WSY
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Posts: 715




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« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2012, 09:22:20 AM »

Having worked my way through college fixing TV sets, I have very little love for the notion
of restoring them.

In the UK there is a group of hobbyists who restore the old 405-line VHF television sets. This is a B/W transmission standard whose transmitters were finally switched off in the 1980s. There is just about no source of "content" to watch on these restored TVs, but enthusiasts have become very inventive at adapting old VCRs to play back in 405 lines (apparently, relatively early VCR models can be used for this). They have even been lobbying for the BBC or others to help put 405 lines "back on the air" with a demonstration transmitter. As someone who remembers watching Dr. Who and Top of the Pops on those old sets I vaguely understand the nostalgia and remember the not very high pitched squeal that was very evident to young ears, as well as the white dot that blossomed and then shrank in the middle of the screen when you turned the set off. If you want to sample the tenets of that hobby, Google "405 alive".

In the early 1970s I was at a boarding school where TV was basically forbidden except for one "TV room" that was closed down every evening. So, I got a broken Murphy set from the parents of a friend, bought the schematic by mail order, then repaired the set (replacing a couple of dead capacitors) then wired it up in the dorm, concealed inside a giant speaker cabinet (TVs were banned but 50-watt stereos blasting out the Stones were perfectly legal). I ran a headphone cable to each bed in the 5-boy dorm. When I think back on this I shudder, because the chassis of that set was live, so one side of the A/C mains supply was being piped to each bed in the room!

I held an A/C switch in my hand under the bedcovers and killed the set whenever a housemaster toured the corridors "after lights out time." After a few months of this I was finally caught when I wasn't quite fast enough on the draw with the switch (too excited by the action in the John Wayne movie "Stagecoach" if my memory serves me correctly). Even then, the housemaster who came into the dorm thought that someone was reading with a flashlight. When I couldn't produce a flashlight, I ended up being forced to confess about the TV set. The screen was concealed behind the gauzy loudspeaker grille. When the TV was on, the grille was in effect transparent. When it was off, you couldn't see the TV screen unless the speaker cabinet was well lit (daylight). I had a motorized cardboard "mask" that I used to hide the screen completely during daylight hours.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
« Last Edit: August 16, 2012, 10:02:27 AM by KB1WSY » Logged
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