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Author Topic: Is there room in the hobby for the 1%?  (Read 8500 times)
K1CJS
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Posts: 6061




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« Reply #30 on: August 17, 2012, 03:52:01 AM »

There are still plenty, Rob, who refuse to learn.  These hams tend to the communicating end, refuse to learn to properly tune and set their rigs, pushing those rigs for all they're worth till they fail or the opposite, transmitting with lower power and insufficient gain to make their signal readable, just buying a commercially made antenna and having someone else put it up for them--and then not bothering to make sure that antenna is maintained and so on.

These hams just pick up the mike and talk, just as there are those who just turn the key of their cars and drive.  They don't bother to check the oil in the engine, make sure the tires are properly inflated, etc. etc. etc.

There are all kinds of hams just as there are all kinds of people.  The old adage "You can bring a horse to water, but you can't make him drink" comes to mind here.  73!
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #31 on: August 17, 2012, 02:59:20 PM »

There are still plenty, Rob, who refuse to learn.  These hams tend to the communicating end, refuse to learn to properly tune and set their rigs, pushing those rigs for all they're worth till they fail or the opposite, transmitting with lower power and insufficient gain to make their signal readable, just buying a commercially made antenna and having someone else put it up for them--and then not bothering to make sure that antenna is maintained and so on.

These hams just pick up the mike and talk, just as there are those who just turn the key of their cars and drive.  They don't bother to check the oil in the engine, make sure the tires are properly inflated, etc. etc. etc.

There are all kinds of hams just as there are all kinds of people.  The old adage "You can bring a horse to water, but you can't make him drink" comes to mind here.  73!

It's sad to think that some people don't maximise the opportunities available.
I guess, so far, I have not met many of these individuals, but I take your word that they are out there.
It's like buying a high performance car and only driving it around the car park at 10MPH.

I don't tend to hang around the chat nets, so perhaps that's why I have been shielded from this demographic.
In any case, "different horses for different courses", to keep the equine theme going.

Keep hanging in there.

73 - Rob
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KD7QLU
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Posts: 35




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« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2012, 11:14:55 AM »

A major problem in ham radio is the number of people who can't seem to stop criticizing other hams.  If a guy asks a question in a forum that you think they should have googled first, then simply don't respond to the post.  If a guy posts about a new rig he bought and his excitement, don't reply with a criticism of the rig or suggestion he should have bought something else.  Congratulate him and wish him well.  If a guy wants to study for his license by memorizing the test questions, that's well within his rights to do it.  If you love the tech/electronic side of the hobby, hang with like minded people and leave the non-tech minded people alone to enjoy what is supposed to be a fun hobby.  If you like CW, good for you.  If you just like to work local repeaters, awesome.  There's more important things in life to worry about than ham radio.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 4004




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« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2012, 09:50:29 PM »

QLU:  Criticism is good for the ham and good for the hobby.  Criticism is an excellent motivator!  If a ham with a question comes here to ask a question and sees someone being criticized for not even attempting research, perhaps it will motivate him to look first and then ask.

I can't recall anyone here being criticized for asking a question that he has researched first.  The only criticism I see are towards those who ask questions that are so simple that it's ridiculous or ask a question that you know damn well is covered in the equipment manual!

Before you jump on that, if a person reads instructions on how to do something in their equipment manual and doesn't understand it...... that's different.  I've never seen any criticism on this either.

As for ham radio being a fun hobby..... it's only a fun hobby if you can get your station assembled to the point it works.  Until then, this hobby can be an exercise in frustration as you learn the ropes.  This requires effort. Those who don't want to put forth an effort attracts deserved criticism.

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KASSY
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Posts: 167




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« Reply #34 on: August 20, 2012, 06:54:23 AM »

I look back at the local hams where I grew up in the 1960's. There was a civil servant who had taught radio in the RAF in WW2 because of his ham radio knowledge, and a TV service man. Other than those 'professionals', there was the foreman of a local building company, a butcher, a car mechanic, a factory labourer, a printer, a coal mining trades union official, a quantity surveyor and a production supervisor in a wire rope factory. All of them at one stage or another had built something, even if it was only a crystal calibrator, and about half of them were keen on operating and DX chasing. All of them had passed a written exam about equal to the then General Class, and a 12 wpm Morse Test.

So have we 'dumbed down' or do we expect to work less for the same results that our predecessors  got?

It seems to me that the laborers, surveyors, and other nominally "first line" workers are the ones with the free time to do the homebrewing.  The 1%, the subject of the original enquiry, IME, are often traveling abroad for business, get very little time at home, rarely work less than 80-100 hours per week.

ISTM that would not be a problem of "dumbing down" so much as priority-setting.  I have not (and do not expect to) reach the levels in business where I would have such troubles, but I can imagine myself considering the trade-offs.  "Do I spend the next few evenings assembling an electronic kit for my own pleasure, or instead, spend the same time creating a business plan that would allow our east coast operation to generate 250 new jobs?"  I would go for job growth.  Although, I certainly have, a few times, given up weekends I could have spent hamming, to help my employer through difficulties that would have led to layoffs. 

- k
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K8AXW
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Posts: 4004




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« Reply #35 on: August 20, 2012, 10:08:32 AM »

KASSY:  You make a very valid point but then you jump to an extreme when you introduce "kit building." 

This isn't what I and others are trying to explain here.  First of all, said executive/100hr per week business man has found the time to develop an interest in ham radio; found the time to study for the test; found time to go someplace to take the test; found time to research and accumulate station components; found time to put the all together to make it work and finally finds the time to set and talk.

I feel your point is now leaking.  While nobody is advocating that everyone becomes an electronics technician, it seems to me that each ham should learn the basics, which includes assembling the station and making it work.  This also includes reading their individual equipment manuals.

One of my favorite people learned to drive a car. She learned enough to pass her test and from that point on her learning curve flattened out and she was a hazard on the road.  I found her parked at the side of the road late at night with her windshield fogged up because she had never learned to turn on the windshield defroster!  She eventually had 3 wrecks and gave up her license. 

We are talking about so called hams who can talk but "don't know how to turn on their defrosters!"  They come to these forums asking extremely basic questions that could be answered by checking their manuals or a simple bit of research. 

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N4CR
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Posts: 1703




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« Reply #36 on: August 20, 2012, 04:22:21 PM »

I think I captured it.

What's the general opinion?  Is the hobby welcoming of hams who don't plan to be good at DIY?  Is there room for the ham whose income allows him to pursue more expensive hobbies, therefore ham radio isn't his #1?

The same things are wrong with ham radio operators that are wrong with every people on earth.

Wrath, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy, and gluttony.

None of that has anything to do with being the in the 1% you speak of. It is spread across that 1% in equal proportions to the other 99% and will be for the rest of our lifetimes.

It's a shame this thread started out and continued to be played out along class warfare lines. Perhaps envy is your weak point.

Believing that CW or any technical test can keep these basic properties of people out of the ham population is insanity.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2012, 04:31:06 PM by N4CR » Logged

73 de N4CR, Phil

Never believe an atom. They make up everything.
W9KEY
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Posts: 1165




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« Reply #37 on: August 20, 2012, 04:34:08 PM »


What's the general opinion?  Is the hobby welcoming of hams who don't plan to be good at DIY?  Is there room for the ham whose income allows him to pursue more expensive hobbies, therefore ham radio isn't his #1?

curious

- k

The top 1% pretty much do what they want.   Roll Eyes
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KD7QLU
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Posts: 35




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« Reply #38 on: August 20, 2012, 07:58:04 PM »

AXW... consider for a moment that this is the internet and you have no idea of the background of the people posting.  A lot of people have learning disabilities, reading/comprehension issues, etc.  Have you considered that they may be posting basic questions simply because they need the help?  Isn't that what Elmers are for?  I recommend that people err on the side of common courtesy and if the question doesn't meet your standards simply ignore it and move on.
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K8AXW
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Posts: 4004




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« Reply #39 on: August 20, 2012, 09:22:38 PM »

QLU: 
Quote
I recommend that people err on the side of common courtesy and if the question doesn't meet your standards simply ignore it and move on.

You must be new here.  Whenever possible I try to help any with any question, no matter what I feel about it.  Nor do I inject disgust.

I do feel that some questions are so basic that they are ridiculous.  I do, on occasion, after answering the question to the best of my ability suggest that they research some....even Google it.....

As for a learning disability, I understand that one.  I have it.  It takes me 3 to 5 times longer to understand written information that the 'average' person.  If I am told to do 3 things by the time the person gets to #3 I have forgotten the first one.  And it goes on.

For 18 years I simply thought I was stupid.  Try living with that feeling!  Once I learned what  was wrong with me (no thanks to any doctor, psychiatrist or counselor) I was able to compensate for this problem.  I did that by working that 3 to 5 times harder for everything I had to learn.  I STILL have to reread and study even the basics today.  But I do it.

No doubt this is the major factor for my intolerance to people who are simply too lazy to try!

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STAYVERTICAL
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« Reply #40 on: August 21, 2012, 02:45:53 AM »

I have just re-read the original post to see exactly what was intended to be conveyed.

It seems to me, that this gentleman was saying:

1. He was not fond of using a soldering iron and building equipment.
2. His major interest in ham radio was talking with and meeting interesting people.
3. He had tried other hobbies which were solitary and did not want to bring the same isolation into his practice of ham radio.
4. He was fortunate to be able to visit some of the friends he made over the air.
5. He was fortunate to be able to buy any ham gear he needed.

According to the original post, he did NOT say:

1. That he had no technical knowledge.
2. That he excluded himself from the ham fraternity (it was mentioned he belonged to a ham club).


Based on these observations I find it difficult to see how this gentleman differed from many mainstream hams.
Many hams have nice equipment, some took longer to accumulate it than others, but most have at least one good quality transceiver.
We all enjoy talking with other hams, and some have met them and become friends.

While many hams are technical people such as Engineers, many others are professionals or skilled in their chosen field.
I hardly think that a doctor would be seen as unskilled for example, simply because they chose not to build a K3.

The scapegoat is a favourite sacrificial creature, but it often does not deserve its position.
The politics of income envy have been exploited by politicians for centuries.

For example, income tax was only introduced in the early 1900's.
It was voted in on the platform of taxing the wealthy.
The majority of citizens thought this was a good idea, but of course this was only a ruse to open the door.
In a short time, every citizen found themselves on the tax cart - the original intention.

We have probably all met many wealthy people, I certainly have.
The most pronounced attribute they have in my opinion is how everyday they are.
Some of them you would give a handout if you knew no better.

I once knew a young man who said he wanted to become a multi-millionaire by age 30 (he was 21).
I asked him why? - he said so he could relax on the beach.

Since he had no wealthy relatives who could leave him money, I gave him the following advice.
My advice was to take all of his income after expenses and buy lottery tickets.
Why?
Because in my experience, those goals become the end rather than the means.
I told him by the time he had achieved this goal he would be so enmeshed in making money, he would never stop and relax.
This is only natural, and is what happens to many people in the world.
The only money you can enjoy spending is what took no effort to earn.
I know this sounds loony, but if you think about it, you will see some truth there.

I met this young man at age 32 - still no millions - still did not go to the beach.

I never envy those who have to work outrageously to earn a large income - I know they are in a golden cage.
I respect them for their work ethic, but envy is not fitting for them.

Diogenes was a greek philosopher who made a virtue out of simplicity.
He lived in an old tub on the street, but his fame spread widely.
One day Alexander the great, who had conquered much of the known world came to visit him.
Alexander asked Diogenes if there was anything he could do for him.
Diogenes answered " Yes, you could move out of my sunlight".

Alexander marvelled, and stated " If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenese".

73 - Rob
« Last Edit: August 21, 2012, 02:49:17 AM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
K8AXW
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Posts: 4004




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« Reply #41 on: August 21, 2012, 07:55:08 AM »

STAYVERTICAL:  Sometimes these posts take on a life of their own, don't they?
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 875




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« Reply #42 on: August 21, 2012, 01:02:13 PM »

STAYVERTICAL:  Sometimes these posts take on a life of their own, don't they?

8AXW, you are so right.
It's a bit like how people can see all sorts of shapes in clouds.
One person sees a bunny, another sees a cat.

Makes life interesting though.

73 - Rob
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K4EZD
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Posts: 101




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« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2012, 01:47:25 PM »

The answer to this question depends on who is asking the question and what is meant by “is there room”.  As a retired therapist I always start by analyzing what is the real meaning of the question and what does it say about the person who is asking the question.  In ham radio the only “person” who really matters is the FCC and the answer is that there is room in ham radio for any person who holds a valid license and who uses the equipment within the given rules and regulations.  All the rest is personal preference and opinion.  Smiley
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K8AXW
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« Reply #44 on: August 22, 2012, 09:09:39 AM »

Well, I think we've beat this one to death...... thanks for the free "couch time" EZD.  I'll have to step back and analyze this a bit.   Cheesy
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