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Author Topic: lube to use when pulling coax  (Read 5755 times)
KB2HUK
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Posts: 164




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« on: August 22, 2012, 02:35:01 PM »

Hello folks !   Soon I will need to pull some 150 ft of coax through about 125 ft of 4inch pvc .  There are 3 coax lines and one rotor line in there now .  The line has been in the ground for around 10 yrs. and there is a 30 degree decline for the last 20 feet .  I am anticipating trouble pulling a line through I am planning to tape a new coax to the end of one of the existing coax and pull the old one out which should pull the new one in as well .  Should I use some sort of lube to put on the new coax when pulling it through ? If so what is the best thing to use ?  Thanks for taking the time to answer .  John Molenda kb2huk 
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AA4HA
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Posts: 1434




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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2012, 02:44:34 PM »

There is wire pulling lube at places like Lowes, Home Depot or an electrical supply store. It comes in squirt bottles and looks like a quart of yellow snot. While you are in there. also pull in a strong nylon cord so the next time you will have a line to fish another coax through.

Prepared to get messy. If you have a helper like your child, let them squirt the stuff in while you are pulling from the other side. They will get a kick when they see you covered with this yellow snot stuff.

Google "wire pulling lubricant" (in quotes) and you will see that even Amazon.com sells it.
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Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
W8JX
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2012, 02:59:36 PM »

Or could simply use some spray silicone lube.
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All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
KD0REQ
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Posts: 932




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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2012, 03:27:22 PM »

spray silicone is going to go dead as soon as you hit some condensate or leakage water in the conduit, or some dust.  and I'm not convinced it doesn't degrade the insulation.

Polywater or Ideal pulling fluid are the two that I've used on wire and fiber.  Ideal gets sticky as the water slowly evaporates, but you can find it without a Graybar or Anixter account rep.
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KE4DRN
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Posts: 3722




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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2012, 03:48:47 PM »

hi

you can get clear cable lube at home depot.

73 james
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 373




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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2012, 03:51:41 PM »

I once had to pull some electrical cable through a steel conduit, it was a nightmare, so rang a friend who was an electrician, his reply rather smugly was baby powder.  Anyway going nowhere fast, i pulled the cable out and tipped some baby powder down the conduit, well the cable nearly fell down it.

Must be something to do with smoothing out all those microscopic blemishes.

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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
KH6DC
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Posts: 642




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« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2012, 05:47:19 PM »

I had a inch and a half CPV about 30 linear feet long with only a RG8X and used Johnson's Baby power.

Good luck!

73, Delwyn KH6DC
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73 and Aloha,
de Delwyn, KH6DC
K3GM
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Posts: 1799




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« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2012, 06:11:57 PM »

Ideal Wire Lube, HD or Lowes.  I've pulled 160' of Heliax then two SteppIR control cables thru 4" conduit all without the need for lube.  I had a pusher feeding while I pulled at the far end.
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KB2HUK
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Posts: 164




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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2012, 11:09:34 AM »

wish I had lubed the coax before I put it in .  I now will have to spray the lube from the end I am pulling which may not do the trick as the pvc runs about 150 ft. remember I am not installing it but pulling it out .  What about running the hose from the end I am pulling at least that way some water may make it the full length of the pvc pipe and make it easier to pull .  I will have some one lube the new coax as it goes in so as not to stress it . Next time I will use 6 inch pipe .  John kb2huk
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KD0REQ
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Posts: 932




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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2012, 11:15:52 AM »

you know, if the wire is half in there already, try the baby powder route.  use the "blower" end of a shop vac on both ends of the conduit, and blow that stuff in there.  pull back a little, then start pulling forward again.  can't hurt.
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NW0M
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2012, 11:29:36 AM »

I'm just curious with such long multiple runs of 150 feet of coax if a remote antenna switch would make sense?  Only requires one primary coax run along with the cable for the switch?  Cost-wise it would also be cheaper than buying three or four runs of coax.

I'm posing the question with hopes of someday having the same questions myself to run coax for multiple beams and dipoles from a tower. 

Maybe not a solution for you at this point but just wondering what the downside would be for that approach?

73, Mitch

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SWMAN
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Posts: 563




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« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2012, 12:46:48 PM »

 Greenlee makes some good wire pulling lube called YELLOW 77, works good but yes, it does look like yellow snot.
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WG8Z
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Posts: 190




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« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2012, 04:59:59 PM »

I'm just curious with such long multiple runs of 150 feet of coax if a remote antenna switch would make sense?  Only requires one primary coax run along with the cable for the switch?  Cost-wise it would also be cheaper than buying three or four runs of coax.

I'm posing the question with hopes of someday having the same questions myself to run coax for multiple beams and dipoles from a tower. 

Maybe not a solution for you at this point but just wondering what the downside would be for that approach?

73, Mitch



Downside is when the switch quits working or when you want to run two or more radios/antennas at the same time.
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NW0M
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Posts: 24




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« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2012, 05:31:46 PM »

Yeah, I understand the multiple rig/antenna operation limitation but other than that it seems like a nice option.  I am not aware of a high failure rate for the switches. 

I use an Ameritron remote switch now to limit the holes drilled through the wall for my second floor shack and the ease to add and change temporary antenna's.  My backup plan is to just connect a single antenna with a barrel connector if the switch failed.  Not perfect but keeps me on the air.

Something to consider.

73, Mitch
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KB2HUK
Member

Posts: 164




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« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2012, 08:16:18 PM »

I am adding the "rat pac " from Array Solutions to remote and end up running just two pieces of coax and a rotor cable. NO one likes the water hose idea ? javascript:void(0);  John kb2huk

Ps: is there a high failure rate for remote switches ?
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