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Author Topic: Roof Tower - Alternative to Glen Martin  (Read 18703 times)
NI0Z
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« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2012, 01:26:11 PM »

My GME experience just about 5 weeks was not like this at all.  I used their GME supply website and got a quote and everything.  I called the number listed there and the gal who answered took great care of me, even allowing me to go get the tower and parts in Boonville.

Anyways, I know people will tell you that 4 or 5 foot towers are all you need, however, if you want to do it right, find out the wind load of your antenna and the wind zone you live in.  You'll be amazed at what you need to do the job right.

You can see the GME 8 footer with a hex and rotator on it on my site below.

Zero regrets!  Also lots of notes in the Station Updates Article you may find useful.
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W0NQF
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« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2012, 07:15:08 PM »


I am looking for a roof tower
I have a Glen Martin roof top tower. It is the 9' footer, with thrust bearing. The bottom 4 legs are missing, or rather misplaced while moving, so it's about 5'7" without them. I have the padded feet for it also. I'm using a vertical now due to selling my beam and physical limitations.
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NE4CW
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« Reply #17 on: June 29, 2012, 10:28:23 AM »

I received the GM 1832 on Teusday, Yesterday I assembled the tower. It took me about 4 - 5 hours or so to get it assembled. I know that some reports of these roof towers are not too good, but this is the second GM roof tower I have owned, and everything went together perfectly. No miss-drilled holes, no burs. The assembly instructions are not the best, but after 30 minutes or so of figuring out what you have, it goes together easily. Now I have to get it up on the roof..
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NJ5W
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« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2012, 08:20:15 AM »

I'm still on the fence as to whether to put up the 8ft or the 18ft tower.....I've read a lot of good things about Glen Martin and re-enforcing the roof seems easy enough. My roof seems to be around 25 ft...so with 18 ft I should be around 43ft with the tower and then another 3 ft or so for the tri bander...

Is it worth it with a height of 46ft vs 36 ft? Smiley
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KI4SDY
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« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2012, 09:38:08 AM »

You need to check the wind load limitations given by the manufacturers of these towers (they are not high) and have a licensed professional investigate the roof structure of your house. If it does not meet the current building code for roofs, you may be planning for disaster in a wind storm. Call your local code enforcement and see if you need a permit. Then contact your insurance company to see if they will pay out after you have add this change to your roof. Wink

For what you are going to spend, I would go with a ground mounted tower or a heavy duty telescoping pole with guys.  Smiley
« Last Edit: August 23, 2012, 09:44:37 AM by KI4SDY » Logged
K3VAT
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« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2012, 09:59:11 AM »

I'm still on the fence as to whether to put up the 8ft or the 18ft tower.....I've read a lot of good things about Glen Martin and re-enforcing the roof seems easy enough. My roof seems to be around 25 ft...so with 18 ft I should be around 43ft with the tower and then another 3 ft or so for the tri bander...

Is it worth it with a height of 46ft vs 36 ft? Smiley

The GM 18 is a very good roof tower.  I like it as it has nearly 3 feet between the rotorplate and the thrust bearing.  However, this is a big unit with 8 ft^2 windload.  One can mount a decent yagi with upwards of another 8 ft^2 of windload however, you must take extra precautions in affixing it to the roof.  There are a couple of different ways to mount a roof tower.  I prefer the method where you 1) reinforce the roof rafters by installing 'scabs' (usually 2"x10"x8') on existing roof rafters were each pair of legs attaches (via bolt fasteners); 2) peel back shingles and roof felt or remove roof tiles around the perimeter where the roof tower affixes to the roof - Inspect.  You need to make sure that the roof underlayment is in very good condition with no compromises in roof integrity.  Sometimes one needs to replace old, thin OSB underlayment with new HD plywood.  Then after securely mounting the tower replace with fresh felt, sealant, roof shingles.  You absolutely need a 100% watertight seal - one can't skimp on this step.

If you feel that you (or professional helpers) can adequately do this, then I recommend the 18' tower.  One caveat - if you live in an ice-prone region, then I'd scale back to the 8 footer.

GL, Rich, K3VAT
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