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Author Topic: short wave listening as a hobby is finished.  (Read 151778 times)
N8AUC
Member

Posts: 315




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« Reply #90 on: November 08, 2016, 10:44:38 AM »

That will happen about 50 years after the Cubs win their next World Series. Grin

THE CUBS WIN THE WORLD SERIES!!!

OK, 50 years after the Cleveland Browns win their first Super Bowl. Wink Grin
Ouch.

But congrats to the Cubs on their win. If anyone was going to beat my beloved Cleveland Indians,
I'm glad it was the Cubs. Cubs fans are just about the only fans who have waited for a championship
longer than we have.

Now we gotta work on the Browns. They need a lot of help. Badly.

73 de N8AUC
Eric
(Yes - from Cleveland, OH)
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WW7KE
Member

Posts: 584




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« Reply #91 on: November 12, 2016, 03:10:38 PM »

Now we gotta work on the Browns. They need a lot of help. Badly.

Is LeBron available to play QB on Sundays? Grin
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
KK3OQ
Member

Posts: 8




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« Reply #92 on: December 28, 2016, 11:49:27 AM »

Years ago, I was a keen short wave listener, but one by one my regular broadcasters shut down. The final nail in the coffin was the end of Radio Netherlands and Canada.
Thats it, its over.

WBCQ is still there.
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RENTON481
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Posts: 186




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« Reply #93 on: January 02, 2017, 04:42:43 PM »

The BBC is still audible in English during the mornings on the West Coast (broadcast from Singapore), if propagation is favorable.

Problem is, propagation hasn't been very favorable lately on the SWBC bands. Tuned in R. Australia the other night on 9580 -- it used to be S4-S5 signals consistently.  Could barely hear it. 49 meters had three or four grainy signals.
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HFCRUSR
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Posts: 234




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« Reply #94 on: January 02, 2017, 04:56:06 PM »

I get their transmitters in Seychelles, Ascension, Africa, and Europe here on the west coast-even my daytime. Luckily, BBC and VOA are still rolling in here from those points and I am happy to hear them.
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WW7KE
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Posts: 584




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« Reply #95 on: January 02, 2017, 05:05:21 PM »

The BBC is still audible in English during the mornings on the West Coast (broadcast from Singapore), if propagation is favorable.

Problem is, propagation hasn't been very favorable lately on the SWBC bands. Tuned in R. Australia the other night on 9580 -- it used to be S4-S5 signals consistently.  Could barely hear it. 49 meters had three or four grainy signals.

Their 0500-0600Z English transmission from Ascension I. on 7445 comes into Arizona at S9 to 20 over just about every night.
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He speaks fluent PSK31...  One QSO with him earns you 5BDXCC...  His Wouff Hong has two Wouffs... Hiram Percy Maxim called HIM "The Old Man..."  He is... The Most Interesting Ham In The World!
RIVERRAT373
Member

Posts: 3




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« Reply #96 on: January 07, 2017, 12:07:54 PM »

I got interested in shortwave listening in 1969 when I built a Star Roamer  shortwave radio from a kit. Not only do I miss the BBC, Radio Canada, Radio Nederland, and many more silent stations, I also miss the magazines we used to have! I was just looking over an old issue of POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS. I used to have the original issue but foolishly let it go! I also subscribed to MONITORING TIMES when it was a free publication printed on newsprint paper!  Cry
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KC2QYM
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Posts: 852




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« Reply #97 on: January 25, 2017, 08:17:18 AM »

I believe that those who own SW receiver boat anchors only have a short time window to get a reasonable price for their radios in what will soon be an obsolete hobby...SWLing. Specific to North American listeners, more governments are defunding and closing down their external services. Now unless you speak numerous languages, the pleasure of listening to English language transmissions is vanishing. Sure you can receive amateur chatter, RTTY, occasional marine and aviation transmissions, etc. English language transmissions are too few to generate any excitement. I have moved my Hallicrafters receiver into a closet and gave up trying to sell it as there have been no takers. I sold off the few portables I had at ham fests for $25 a piece. I still scan through the SW bands with my transceiver and am always disappointed. So yes, SWL is finished in my opinion.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3525




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« Reply #98 on: January 25, 2017, 06:48:09 PM »

I got interested in shortwave listening in 1969 when I built a Star Roamer  shortwave radio from a kit. Not only do I miss the BBC, Radio Canada, Radio Nederland, and many more silent stations, I also miss the magazines we used to have! I was just looking over an old issue of POPULAR COMMUNICATIONS. I used to have the original issue but foolishly let it go! I also subscribed to MONITORING TIMES when it was a free publication printed on newsprint paper!  Cry
   You can now see all of those old magazines for FREE on:  www.AmericanRadioHistory.com !!   Roll Eyes
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K5TED
Member

Posts: 92




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« Reply #99 on: January 27, 2017, 08:18:18 PM »

Shortwave continues to be a great hobby for me. The bands are noisy and I'm not fluent in Latvian but still find plenty of interesting stations.

My best radio hobby friend is Bob Sillet's Shortwave Log. Still working after all these years.

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KC2UGV
Member

Posts: 529




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« Reply #100 on: February 06, 2017, 08:07:04 AM »

I believe that those who own SW receiver boat anchors only have a short time window to get a reasonable price for their radios in what will soon be an obsolete hobby...SWLing. Specific to North American listeners, more governments are defunding and closing down their external services. Now unless you speak numerous languages, the pleasure of listening to English language transmissions is vanishing. Sure you can receive amateur chatter, RTTY, occasional marine and aviation transmissions, etc. English language transmissions are too few to generate any excitement. I have moved my Hallicrafters receiver into a closet and gave up trying to sell it as there have been no takers. I sold off the few portables I had at ham fests for $25 a piece. I still scan through the SW bands with my transceiver and am always disappointed. So yes, SWL is finished in my opinion.

I'm going the other way:  I hear lots of foreign language stations.  So, the fix for me is:  Start learning a foreign language, and use my SWLing as language practice.
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RENTON481
Member

Posts: 186




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« Reply #101 on: February 06, 2017, 09:37:43 AM »

Or -- just learn some key words in foreign languages, like the polite endings in Korean and Japanese (to be able to tell them apart if you have difficulty doing that)... Korean polite ending to words is "-amnida" and Japanese has one that I forget but if you listen you'll hear it nearly every third sentence.

Urdu and Hindi have the verb "is" or "be" which is heard frequently, "hai".

Stuff like that makes it a bit more interesting -- you don't necessarily have to learn the entire language, just getting accustomed to the sounds and it can help you ID a language, and ID a station that way.

I don't mind hearing foreign languages on the SW... But it's a bit better if the stations play music, too.

I know a little Spanish, which helps sometimes. And sometimes doesn't. :-)
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