Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 4 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: short wave listening as a hobby is finished.  (Read 52874 times)
HFCRUSR
Member

Posts: 155




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2012, 11:15:23 AM »

N4OI
rodger on the "challenge" of pulling in those beamed in another direction-those account for from what I see, the majotity of them. To me that's the fun of it.
I cannot listen to cuba-man every other word is bashing America lol!
73s-Frank
Logged
HFCRUSR
Member

Posts: 155




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2012, 05:05:51 PM »

uh..comma after "account for" and I misspelled "majoRity" sorry
Logged
EI4GMB
Member

Posts: 166




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2012, 08:34:53 AM »

'HFCRUSR', thanks for providing those links. I will listen out for these stations.

Kind Regards

Fred EI4GMB
Logged

'You can never plan the future by the past'

'Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it.'

Edmund Burke (1729-1797)
N3HAM
Member

Posts: 27




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2012, 03:18:29 PM »

Even though I have several ham rigs and nifty tiny portables to listen to, it's still fun to listen to the SW broadcast bands on old gear. Radio Australia an RNZI sound great on on an Hallicrafters. There is enough English broadcasting to occupy my attention span and SW will never die, just change.
Logged
N3HAM
Member

Posts: 27




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 31, 2012, 03:24:46 PM »

Sorry, I'm a bad proofreader. Meant "on an old Hallicrafters".
Logged
HFCRUSR
Member

Posts: 155




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: August 31, 2012, 04:15:00 PM »

'HFCRUSR', thanks for providing those links. I will listen out for these stations.

Kind Regards

Fred EI4GMB
EI4GMB
you're welcome Smiley They run very helpful SWL sites-both of them-I use them daily.
Logged
HFCRUSR
Member

Posts: 155




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: August 31, 2012, 04:17:30 PM »

Even though I have several ham rigs and nifty tiny portables to listen to, it's still fun to listen to the SW broadcast bands on old gear. Radio Australia an RNZI sound great on on an Hallicrafters. There is enough English broadcasting to occupy my attention span and SW will never die, just change.
I agree! You just cannot knock Hallicrafters' rich audio-it just adds to the enjoyment.
Logged
KJ6ZOL
Member

Posts: 459




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2012, 11:18:00 PM »

My first radio was a Hallicrafters S-40. Got it from a Elmer in my mom's church congregation. I'd been bugging her for a SW radio, but the prices gave her sticker shock. This was in 1986, when I was 12. The Halli was sitting in this guy's closet, so it was mine. I used it for a while, but eventually the dial cord broke, and the rectifier (they were using a 4 pin 80 tube as a rectifier in 1946, go figure) died. I never could get it to work right afterward-those radios were a bear to align. By that time I had a Realistic DX-440. Used that until I got a DX-396, and eventually a Degen 1102, domestic Chinese version. The 440 now resides with a family of Ukrainian immigrants, who listen to Russian domestics with it. The 396 went to Iraq with a welder of hillbilly armor.
Logged
W4ARZ
Member

Posts: 4




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: April 21, 2015, 08:21:56 AM »

 Angry Obviously you are yet another "educated Ham ".  So I guess that since not as many hams are on the air as once was.Ham radio is also going in the trash like YOU so intelligently claim that shortwave is !  Fact is...  So why not open your mind to the fact that the face of radio changes over the decades.Doesn't mean that anything is in the trash...or is dead . YAWN !!!!   Do you have a cell phone Huh If so then why are you still using HAM RADIO Huh huh Huh COme on guy....give us all a break.
Fact is there's a lot more use of the spectrum than ever before that we have to enjoy. I am an extra class ham, I have a cell phone. I listen to shortwave every day ..and there are some new stations that just came online this year. and some that went away.. NO it will never be like it was in the 60's but Ham radio isn't the same either....And you cell phone will also not be the same in 10 yrs as it is now..  Wise up ! Just because you don't enjoy shortwave listening doesn't mean that it is gone or dying...just evolving... Hey...I'll even bet you have evolved yourself over the past decade or too... Bet you were once a lot more objective years ago than now. The frequency spectrum is HUGE... and there's a lot more fun we can have with it than we ever had before in the history of our hobby. I'll bet you think AM broadcast radio is dead too...ha ha ha ha ha ...  oh ye of little faith...or knowledge.. Enjoy your own little nich and be happy we still live in a country where that's possible..  Ted Randall of WTWW played all xmas music this year on one of his transmitters 5.085...  He asked listeners to send in pics of the vintage radios they were listening on...He received 8000 ( 8 THOUSAND) pics via email. and not everyone who listens sent in anything..  Allan Weiner of WBCQ owns 4 transmitters. He constantly gets emails from listeners worldwide. Check out Glenn Hausers world of radio. Many people here in good old usa are offended these days by christian radio.. My guess is that gives some people a reason to bust on shortwave.  SO...because of the stuff that goes on at 14.313 and on75 meters at night...we should trash ham radio also ?
Logged
N8YX
Member

Posts: 161




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2015, 05:38:51 AM »

If one knows where to dig, all manner  of utes, pirates, clandestines and similar entertainment may be found throughout the MF/HF radio spectrum.

Personally, I'm glad that the days of stations such as Radio Mockba occupying every 10KHz slot from 7100 and up are long gone.
Logged
N9OGL
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2015, 12:01:34 PM »

Shortwave radio IS dying, according to reports it's costing to much to maintain a SW station, and most are focusing on radio in their country, not worldwide. A lot of stations also found it was cheaper to stream online then running a 50+ KW transmitter(s) on various bands. Shortwave radio is slowly coming to an end.
Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 174




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2015, 12:55:38 PM »

Shortwave radio IS dying, according to reports it's costing to much to maintain a SW station, and most are focusing on radio in their country, not worldwide. A lot of stations also found it was cheaper to stream online then running a 50+ KW transmitter(s) on various bands. Shortwave radio is slowly coming to an end.

True.  Governments won't fund expensive multi-hundred kW transmitters and antenna farms for a few tens of thousands of hobbyists to listen to.  Streaming is far more cost-effective. 

There are exceptions, like China who maintains a network of regional SW stations.  Many of those stations are clearly audible in the US.  Of course, it helps to understand Chinese when tuning them in.

In the case of the old tropical band broadcasters in Latin America, most of those moved to FM when economical transmitters for that band became available down there.  There are some still around, but just a fraction of what there used to be.

But overall, shortwave broadcasting is a dying breed, despite having more and wider bands nowadays.  It won't ever go away completely, but even now, there are probably less than 1/3 of what there was 30 years ago.
Logged
KAPT4560
Member

Posts: 125




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2015, 01:31:17 PM »

 It seems that some countries that are broke or in debt manage to run international SW stations. Radio Bucharest comes to mind. It comes in loud and clear most of the day on multiple bands here.
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_Romania_International
Logged
N9OGL
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2015, 04:16:09 PM »

One solution here in the US would be to allow lower power levels. But this wont happen because the FM AM stations don't want competition. I say that because despite what the FCC believes a lot of people in the US DO listen to SW programming that originates from US.  5 to 10 Kw would be enough to transmit to another country. The general rule is, that the SW station has to be transmitting to another country. It not requirement that it has to be worldwide. On the right Frequency 5KW and 10KW can go long way.

Todd N9OGL
Logged
WW7KE
Member

Posts: 174




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2015, 05:34:49 PM »

One solution here in the US would be to allow lower power levels. But this wont happen because the FM AM stations don't want competition. I say that because despite what the FCC believes a lot of people in the US DO listen to SW programming that originates from US.  5 to 10 Kw would be enough to transmit to another country. The general rule is, that the SW station has to be transmitting to another country. It not requirement that it has to be worldwide. On the right Frequency 5KW and 10KW can go long way.

IIRC, the FCC's policy since the end of WW2 has been that shortwave broadcasters must point their antennas away from the US, or they won't get licensed.  Broadcasts intended to be heard mainly by US audiences cannot be aired on the shortwave bands.

I'm sure, now that broadcast transmitters on US soil are on the 60 and 90 meter "tropical" bands, that could get challenged if an AM or FM broadcaster really wanted to add shortwave.
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 4 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!