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Author Topic: Getting coax cable thru conduit  (Read 13920 times)
N7GCO
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Posts: 147




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« on: August 31, 2012, 05:17:21 PM »

I need to run 85' of coax (213) thru conduit. There is already one electrical cord in the conduit. I seem to be getting stuck on every connection joint. Any ideas how to do it more effectively than I am at present?
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KA7GKN
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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2012, 05:37:41 PM »

You do not run coax in the same conduit as any electrical wire [cord]
first you will inductively pick up line noise
second it's dangerous! Your homeowner's insurance will not cover you if you have an
incident!

What are you attempting to accomplish?
Be specific!

Martin ka7gkn
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AC5UP
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« Reply #2 on: August 31, 2012, 05:43:40 PM »

Depending on the situation this might be an option....

Buy a spool of light nylon cord that's at least 100' long. Or Mason's Line. Tie a cotton ball or a patch of cloth small enough for a loose fit inside the conduit to the end of the line. Using the attachment hose of a vacuum cleaner, try sucking the line through the conduit. Then use the line to pull the RG-213 from one end while someone feeds & pushes the coax from the other.

This goes much easier with someone on each end and be sure to tape the end of the coax so it's rounded and can't snag.

If that doesn't work, you'll need to consider a way to break the conduit into segments and feed it through one segment at a time.
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WB6BYU
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« Reply #3 on: August 31, 2012, 05:47:00 PM »

Or disconnect the existing wire at each end and use it to pull a rope through the
conduit.  Then use the rope to pull the coax and wire.

But I agree - best not to run coax and AC power wiring through the same conduit.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #4 on: August 31, 2012, 06:00:56 PM »

Run another conduit? Where is it located?
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W9GB
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Posts: 2659




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« Reply #5 on: August 31, 2012, 07:27:29 PM »

Quote
I need to run 85' of coax (213) thru conduit. There is already one electrical cord in the conduit. I seem to be getting stuck on every connection joint. Any ideas how to do it more effectively than I am at present?
James,

AS Martin already pointed out, AC wiring is NEVER placed in same conduit
 as low-voltage, network or RF cables.  
That IS a National Electrical Code (NEC) violation.
===
What is the SIZE of this conduit (trade size in inches)??
The MINIMUM size I recommend is 2 inches with no more than TWO 90 degree "sweeps"

Conduit Fill Chart (used primarily for electrical cables)
http://www.westernextralite.com/resources.asp?key=47

Conduit Fill Calculator
http://www.southwire.com/ProductCatalog/conduitfill.jsp
« Last Edit: August 31, 2012, 07:29:09 PM by W9GB » Logged
KD4LLA
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Posts: 463




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« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2012, 09:31:29 PM »

"There is already one electrical cord in the conduit"

AC or DC control line?  I wouldn't think you would run an antenna cable next to a power line...  No one runs an antenna cable through a existing conduit line.
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K2OWK
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Posts: 1077




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« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2012, 10:54:24 PM »

Use a cable puller. It is for pulling wire through conduit or PVC. It comes in various lengths (I use 100 feet) and feeds from a plastic spool. Push it through the pipe, hook the coax to it and pull it through. Very easy.

Just for information DO NOT PULL THE COAX IN THE SAME PIPE AS A POWER LINE, Very dangerous.

73s

K2OWK
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N7GCO
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Posts: 147




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« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2012, 11:23:35 PM »

Thanks for the advice. I will run the coax a different way based on the input. Appreciated the help.
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W6EM
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Posts: 900




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« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2012, 04:07:59 PM »

Couple points.  First and foremost, antenna feedline and power cables should not occupy the same duct.  However, Class I low voltage power, such as 12VAC-24VAC to power lighting and control circuits can occupy the same conduit as 120V branch circuits provided that GFI breaker protection is applied to the 120V branch circuit.

Second, and most important, you should never try to pull in a second cable of any kind once another is in a duct.  Why not?  The extra friction of the two or more cables rubbing their jackets or insulations together will likely damage one or the other or both, creating a serious problem.

Also, a jam can occur, where you couldn't get the new piece pulled in or get it back out.

The only way to safely pull two or more into a conduit is to pull them together, at the same time.

73,

Lee
 
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AA4PB
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« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2012, 04:21:13 PM »

Its okay to run low voltage (below 50V) cable in the same conduit with coax and other low voltage cables. It is against the National Electric Code to place any low voltage cable in the same conduit with high voltage (greater than 50V) cables.

The success in attempting to pull additional cable into a conduit depends primarily on how full the conduit is. That's why its always best to use a large conduit with plenty of room for expansion. For example, if I had a 2-inch conduit containing only one run of RG58 I wouldn't have any problem pulling in a second RG58 run provided there weren't any sharp turns.

I used 3-inch PVC for my underground conduit with swept 90 turns coming out of the ground at each end.
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N7SMI
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« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2012, 04:21:58 PM »

In addition to what every else has noted, the ridges in the joints of most PVC conduit best support pulling coax in only one direction. Reverse the direction of the pull and things will run more smoothly.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2012, 04:23:48 PM »

I ran 2 sets of coaxes thru electrical PVC conduit, but running the coax first, then slipping the 10 foot sections of conduit on over the coax. It was easy with no problems. And I did it by myself. Now, in case you want to run another coax in the future, then also run a pull cord with the coax.

A couple things.

1. I did not glue the sections together, so I could remove them in the future.

2. I was not worried about water seeping in, as the downward grade of my land allowed for water drainage at the far end of the conduit. If that is a concern, drill some holes in each section and insert them facing down.

This used minimal elbow grease.
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N7SMI
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Posts: 373




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« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2012, 04:40:07 PM »

1. I did not glue the sections together, so I could remove them in the future.

2. I was not worried about water seeping in, as the downward grade of my land allowed for water drainage at the far end of the conduit. If that is a concern, drill some holes in each section and insert them facing down.

This is really, really bad advice. You'd be just as well off direct burying the cable. If you've dealt with underground conduit at all you'll know that if there are holes or the sections joints aren't sealed, water WILL get in it. LOTS of water if your soil holds it at all - like putting a sponge in a bucket of water.
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KB1LKR
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Posts: 1898




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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2012, 06:19:40 PM »

Also: try using wire pulling lube, available at any electrical wholesaler, or building supply dealer
e.g.  http://www.idealindustries.com/products/wire_installation/lubricants/

And, as others have said, NEVER pull radio or CATV coax, phone, network, alarm, etc. cable in a conduit w/ power wires! Run a separate conduit.
 
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