Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: question on lighning/surge arrestor  (Read 1958 times)
AK4YA
Member

Posts: 106




Ignore
« on: September 08, 2012, 08:55:14 AM »

Does connecting the PL-259 connector from my (amp/filter/tuner chain) to the arrestor, specifically the coax shield metal connection between the two, not also bond that cable's coax shield to the ground rod?  Or is the arrestor's RF shield like the center pin and also isolated from the ground rod (except for during surges/strikes)?  For some reason I thought that having an RF ground the same as a lightning ground was a bad idea.

thanks!
Logged
K7MH
Member

Posts: 339




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2012, 09:16:47 AM »

Coax shields should be grounded to a ground rod just as the cable enters the house at a minimum.
DX Engineering has a $15 bracket for doing just that.
The arrestors also make doing that easy and afford some protection from currents in the center conductor as well.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 09:20:40 AM by K7MH » Logged
AK4YA
Member

Posts: 106




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2012, 09:38:24 AM »

Coax shields should be grounded to a ground rod just as the cable enters the house at a minimum.
DX Engineering has a $15 bracket for doing just that.
The arrestors also make doing that easy and afford some protection from currents in the center conductor as well.

I see.  So out where the balun connects to my dipole would it also be a good idea to drive a ground rod and use that bracket you mentioned to ground the coax shield out there as well as utilizing the arrestor where the coax enters the house?
Logged
K7MH
Member

Posts: 339




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2012, 09:55:45 AM »

IMO with a dipole I would just ground the shield where the coax enters the house.
With a tower it is a bigger concern. My friend has a FM broadcast tower and antennas on his property. It is about 40-50 ft, I'm not sure how high. It has the heliax shield grounded to the tower in several places along it's route down.
How far you want to go with ham antenna grounding depends I suppose on your perception of the potential risk. In some parts of the country it is a far greater threat than in others.
In any case, all lightning grounds on your property should be bonded to the ground for your electrical service.

What makes a good RF ground is different than what makes a good lightning ground.

Pretty good article about lightning protection here;
http://www.scribd.com/doc/14868226/lightning-protectiontaming-thors-thunderon-a-budget
« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 10:43:37 AM by K7MH » Logged
AK4YA
Member

Posts: 106




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2012, 02:51:47 PM »

got it.  luckily the home power entry is extermely close to where the coax will enter the house, so that lightning arrestor's ground bar will be fairly easy to bond to the power company's rod, assuming I can find it.  (underground power delivery to the home)

as far as grounding my PC, antenna tuner, LPF switch, amp, and AC-to-DC amp-power-supply; I just run as short a ground cable as possible from each device to a common ground entry that connects to the rod my lightning arrestor is bonded to?

Do I even need to worry about doing this ground to the AC-to-DC power supply's ground, given that the power supply is already connected to the home power ground?
« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 02:55:14 PM by KC5VNN » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!