Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Best frequency to use inside factory setting?  (Read 2163 times)
KD8HMB
Member

Posts: 138




Ignore
« on: September 11, 2012, 07:10:40 AM »

A friend of mine works in a manufacturing company that has installed some automatic meters that are capable of connecting to their company LAN. They don't want to run a hard cable and would prefer a wireless solution to connect to the LAN. He stated that their existing wireless office network doesn't work well inside the plant itself due to all of the metal in the infrastructure.
Any recommendations as to what is available re wireless connectivity that could work in that environment? We're looking at approximately 18,000 sq ft coverage
Thanks
Logged
K0IZ
Member

Posts: 737




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2012, 08:28:15 AM »

Sounds to me like they need to hire a professional networking guy. 
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4589




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2012, 08:46:15 AM »

A lot depends on how many nodes and what speed they require.
Logged
KB4QAA
Member

Posts: 2372




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2012, 02:30:37 PM »

with all due respect this is a totally nebulous question.  Seriously.  Nobody can answer something this vague.

This company needs to hire a industrial networking professional, if they are really relying on  their network to make money.

very respectfully, bill
Logged
KD8HMB
Member

Posts: 138




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2012, 02:59:39 PM »

The reason that I though to ask here on eham was based on some reading I have done regarding signal propagation inside buildings. Apparently 800 - 900 mhz signals propgate well inside steel framed buildings, but once you go higher in frequency - say 2.4 ghz where most common wireless routers operate, the signal is diminished and lacks range.

As far as needing a networking expert- the company has a resident PC / network person, but he does not himself have the specific wireless experience beyond the common 2.4 ghz router /gateway/access points.  I was hoping someone here had experience with 800 mhz transmitters and could confirm that 800 mhz devices are worth testing.
Thank you  for your efforts.
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5785




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2012, 03:59:11 PM »

The reason that I though to ask here on eham was based on some reading I have done regarding signal propagation inside buildings. Apparently 800 - 900 mhz signals propgate well inside steel framed buildings, but once you go higher in frequency - say 2.4 ghz where most common wireless routers operate, the signal is diminished and lacks range.

I is not the frequency as much as it is the spectrum itself which is very limited in width/size and is shared with micro wave ovens, cordless phones and blue tooth. When spectrum was laid out many years ago it was to support 11 narrow "B"channels. Then "G" was born which gained speed by spanning several channels and modern day "N" even more. The result the spectrum fills quickly. Consumer devices are then limited in power output to minimize interference in densely populated areas but there is still problems. I you are savy you can scan spectrum for traffic and manually limit the speed of your access points to 18Mbit or less as this allows more to co-exist and extends range too as same power is spread over a narrower spectrum.


As far as needing a networking expert- the company has a resident PC / network person, but he does not himself have the specific wireless experience beyond the common 2.4 ghz router /gateway/access points.  I was hoping someone here had experience with 800 mhz transmitters and could confirm that 800 mhz devices are worth testing.
Thank you  for your efforts.

You answer may lay in 802.11a/5ghz. It came out when b/g did but was largely ignored because technology for it was not mature yet. Today they are starting to use it more and there is no real shared use with it and the spectrum is much much wider too with well over 100 channels availble. Most modern laptops, tablet and even smart phones are now supporting it too. You can also use dual band access points that allow access on A, (5ghz) B or G(2.4ghz).  N is merely a mode used on 2.4 ghz or 5ghz for greater speed so it unique to 2.4 or 5ghz. I have used "A" in home networking for over 9 years now and equipment for it is much better today. I support B/G and A here but use A mostly because it is interference free. 
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4589




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2012, 06:36:56 AM »

Way back in the '90s, the first 802.11 standard was 1 Mb/s, because the marketing guys said they wanted range, not speed. Having got the standard out, they then came back and said 'We want a lot more speed, not range!' In Europe, we had developed a 5GHz Hiperlan standard which offered up to 42 Mb/s but fairly short range: then marketing changed their ideas and a new standard had to be produced.

If 1 Mb/s  is sufficient and you could find the equipment, that might do. There is work going on in the CEPT, led by Siemens and a group of mainly German companies, to produce a standard for this sort of application: they are currently looking in the 5 GHz range. They aren't looking for very high speed.

Also, you may need check the geographical location. I know of office blocks in the UK where 2.4 and 5.6GHz WLAN just don't work: the military radars that get tested on ships in the dockyard kill it for most of the day.
Logged
MDNITERDER
Member

Posts: 146




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2012, 12:14:57 PM »

 I know you said they don't want to but what I have learned when it comes to WiFi vs hardline, Always hardline it. WiFi has a bandwidth limit. The bandwidth on WiFi is shared bandwidth some routers are 480mbps vs hardline that is 10/100/1000mbps dedicated per line. At one shop we have 3 computers on the WiFi and they can see the lag vs the users on the hardline.


 Just my thoughts
Logged
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5785




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2012, 12:23:30 PM »

At one shop we have 3 computers on the WiFi and they can see the lag vs the users on the hardline.

Even G WiFi is more than up to several client on a broad band connection. When they is a noticeable lag it is usually because not all clients have same connection speed with access point and there is some lag as it changes rates for clients. Lock them in at a set speed of 18mb or so and lag will go away on Internet access.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
MDNITERDER
Member

Posts: 146




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2012, 01:04:41 PM »

 I will look into that. Thank you.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!