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Author Topic: SSB below 7,125kHz?  (Read 3530 times)
GILGSN
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Posts: 199




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« on: September 11, 2012, 01:05:15 PM »

Hello,

Can a General class license holder legally use SSB voice slightly below 7,125kHz?

Thanks,

Gil.
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N4JTE
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Posts: 1154




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« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2012, 01:20:34 PM »

No, also on lsb, 7.128 is the bottom of band.
Bob
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WB6BYU
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Posts: 13037




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« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2012, 02:08:58 PM »

Technically the answer is YES, but only under certain conditions.

In those areas in the Western Pacific that are under FCC jurisdiction, and some adjacent
areas, SSB is permitted down to 7.025 MHz.  The applicable part of the FCC rules is 97.307(f)(11).
The same applies to a Maritime Mobile station in IARU Region 1 or 3.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2278




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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2012, 02:34:22 PM »

http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Hambands_color.pdf

ARRL band plan chart.
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N4CR
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Posts: 1655




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« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2012, 02:40:50 PM »

Hello,

Can a General class license holder legally use SSB voice slightly below 7,125kHz?

Thanks,

Gil.

It depends on which country's license you are operating under. For a general class license holder in the US, no.

I hear SSB on 7.035 (the classic 40 meter PSK-31 watering hole) all the time and I believe it's coming from Canada.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
K2OWK
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Posts: 1041




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« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2012, 05:01:01 PM »

No, the a general class license lower band edge is 7.175 MHZ.

73s

K2OWK
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2358




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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2012, 06:15:25 PM »

Probably not Canadian.

The Canadian band plan (which is not legally binding!) is here:

http://www.rac.ca/en/rac/services/bandplans/hf/hfplan-20080711.pdf

The 40m section:

7000 - 7035 CW
7035 - 7040  CW, Narrow Band Digital with other Regions
7040 - 7050  CW, Phone, Narrow Band Digital with other Regions
7050 - 7080  CW, Phone
7080 - 7125 CW, Phone, Narrow Band digital
7125 - 7165 CW, Phone
7165 - 7175 CW, SSTV, FAX, Phone
7175 - 7300 CW, Phone

So there shouldn't be any Canadian phone below 7050 (7053 dial frequency).  But we do use the frequencies between 7050 and 7165.

Charles
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W9GB
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Posts: 2600




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« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2012, 09:18:16 PM »

The 40-meter or 7-MHz band is an amateur radio frequency band,
spanning 7000-7300 kHz in ITU Region-2 (Americas + Greenland), and 7000-7200 kHz in Regions 1 & 3 (rest of world).  It is allocated to radio amateurs worldwide on a primary basis.
==
The 40-meter band was made available to amateurs in the United States by the Third National Radio Conference on October 10, 1924 and allocated on a worldwide basis by the International Radiotelegraph Conference in Washington, D.C., on October 4, 1927.

For many years the portion of the band from 7100–7300 kHz has been allocated to short wave broadcasters outside the Americas and not available to radio amateurs outside ITU Region 2.

At the World Radio Conference WRC-03 in November 2003 it was agreed that the broadcast stations (41 meter shortwave) would move out of the section 7100–7200 kHz on 29 March 2009 and that portion would become a worldwide exclusive amateur allocation afterwards.
Releasing the remaining 100 kHz of the band (7.2 - 7.3 MHz for Regions 1 & 3) to amateurs at a later date is an IARU aim for future conferences.

IARU regions coincide with those of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU).
Region 1 is Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and all of Russia east to its Bering Strait border with (gasp) the United States.
Region 2 is North and South America, plus Greenland.
Region 3 is Asia (minus Asiatic Russia), the Central and South Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. Antarctica and the Arctic are split up accordingly, as the lines run clear to the poles.

ITU REGION 1 (Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and all of Russia east to its Bering Strait border)

7.000 - 7.025 CW, contest preferred (existing prime DX-chasing segment worldwide)
7.025 - 7.040 CW QRP, Center of Activity 7030
7.040 - 7.047 Narrow band digital (PSK31, etc)
7.047 - 7.050 Narrow band digital, auto allowed
7.050 - 7.053 All digital, auto allowed
7.053 - 7.060 All digital
7.060 - 7.100 All modes, 7070 digital voice, 7090 SSB QRP
7.100 - 7.130 All modes, Region 1 Center of Activity 7110
7.130 - 7.200 All modes, SSB contest preferred, SSTV 7165
7.175 - 7.200 All modes, priority for intercontinental

==
World-wide 40 meters
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/40-meter_band
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 09:29:23 PM by W9GB » Logged
VE3FMC
Member

Posts: 983


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2012, 04:05:20 AM »

Hello,

Can a General class license holder legally use SSB voice slightly below 7,125kHz?

Thanks,

Gil.

It depends on which country's license you are operating under. For a general class license holder in the US, no.

I hear SSB on 7.035 (the classic 40 meter PSK-31 watering hole) all the time and I believe it's coming from Canada.

I doubt those signals are from Canada. Yes we can transmit SSB below 7.100. However most Canadians try to avoid SSB below 7.055 simply out of respect for those who operate CW. As my late Father told me years ago "It is a gentleman's agreement"

I have copied many Spanish speaking stations below 7.055.
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NR4C
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Posts: 306




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« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2012, 04:59:26 AM »

Hello,

Can a General class license holder legally use SSB voice slightly below 7,125kHz?

Thanks,

Gil.
K2OWD said it best.  The General phone privileges start at 7.175 in the US.  And, with lower sideband, the signal is actually lower than the indicated 'carrier' so you should aways start at 7.178 plus a little for insurance.


...bill  nr4c

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W1VT
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Posts: 811




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« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2012, 05:44:25 AM »

http://www.chem.hawaii.edu/uham/hfop.html
Hawaii hams can operate LSB in the so called DX window from about 7.075 to 7.100 Mhz. Mainland visitors are often surprised to find HF nets and other LSB activity on 40 meters in this frequency range.

But, to answer your question, no, as I take "slightly below 7125" to mean just a few kHz, not 10s of kHz.
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G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4391




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« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2012, 05:53:06 AM »

Although 7 - 7.2 is allocated on a primary basis to the amateur service, some 20 or 30 countries have footnotes allowing operation of other services in various parts of the band. Although such operation is legal under Article 4.4 of the Radio Regulations, it is required not to cause interference to the primary user and must accept any interference from primary or secondary users. So you may well here foreign language SSB or data almost anywhere in the band, but from Africa, usually around the first 50kHz of the band.

50 years ago, it was Radio Pakistan on 7010....
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KL3HY
Member

Posts: 117




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« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2012, 08:44:04 AM »

http://www.chem.hawaii.edu/uham/hfop.html
Hawaii hams can operate LSB in the so called DX window from about 7.075 to 7.100 Mhz. Mainland visitors are often surprised to find HF nets and other LSB activity on 40 meters in this frequency range.

Yep, same thing here in Alaska.

Few people these days remember that Hawaii and Alaska are both within the US.
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KG6YV
Member

Posts: 506




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« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2012, 09:42:37 AM »

Wait a minute.  The poster said he is a General license holder.  SSB is only allowed for General Class hams on 40M
above 7175.  You need to be an Extra or Advanced to go down to 7125.  Check the ARRL band plan chart...

FYI,

Greg
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WA3SKN
Member

Posts: 5441




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« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2012, 01:14:57 PM »

Remember that we share these frequencies. 
Region one and three had 7.000---7.1000 available for use, Region 3 had 7.000---7.300 available.  Not all countries authorized all available frequencies.
For USA Region 2 hams, SSB is above 7.125 MHz.  Stations below that could be in other countries in Region 2, or outside Region 2.  That is why operating "split" was normal on 40 meters.  You can always use cross-mode though... you use CW while they use SSB.
Note that region 2 and 3 now have 7.000---7.200 available, but also not always authorized, but SW broadcasting is still using the 7.200 and higher... the best reason for getting an extra class license!  Europe is enjoying the 7.1 to 7.2 MHz most now have available to them, try them any evening!
73s.

-Mike.
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