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Author Topic: Most interesting band?  (Read 4568 times)
NU4B
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Posts: 2331




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« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2012, 10:17:57 AM »

When I started the thread I was thinking that 15m is the most interesting band.  Not the most reliable, not open the most, but the most interesting.  You sure get some surprise openings on it, like working 9V at 11am one June morning, or catching XW0X at 2:00pm in the ARRL Dx contest back in 2002.  Catching the E51 dxpedition recently at 9am on CW!  Unexpected things like that.  I also had a blast DXing on 15m during my novice days when I was limited to 21.1 to 21.2 CW on that band.

Anyone else love 15m?

John AF5CC



The truth is all the bands offer something unique for all DX'ers, as you see from the responses. I could give reasons I like each band. Even 80 when conditions are right is fun because its such a challenge (for me at least).
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N5UD
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Posts: 825




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« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2012, 11:22:35 AM »

For me it's 30m. Not heavily used by US stations, but consistently open and quiet at my qth and LOTS of DX

Don KF7DS
Quiet ? You don't live in the south. Nothing quiet down here until dead winter. January and February.
I do like 30M, but it is hardly quiet. Some like 80M. More noisy than 30M. Quite often even 20M and 17M can be noisy.

What a difference a thousand miles makes ?

I read the thread title as interesting. I'd say SIX meters. Not open much of the time, but can have different kinds of propagation. However with sun numbers low, it sure limits that band. Propgation includes E, E-F2, F2, TE, Aur, backscatter, EME, meteor. What did I miss ?

With better sun numbers, 6 or 10. Outside of those two, it is just a question of which band is open to the most diverse places most of the time.
Time to mean not only hour, but months of the year.
73 Tony N5UD
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K0YHV
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Posts: 179




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« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2012, 03:06:06 PM »


I'd say SIX meters. Not open much of the time, but can have different kinds of propagation. However with sun numbers low, it sure limits that band. Propgation includes E, E-F2, F2, TE, Aur, backscatter, EME, meteor. What did I miss ?


You missed Auroral-E and tropo.  I know the latter is pretty rare on 6m but once during a good tropo opening I got a station in Missouri to QSY to 6m because I needed his grid square.  Figured it would be a "right at the noise level" QSO.  WRONG!  He was booming in here louder than on 2m.  Not sure if people can do Ionospheric forward scatter on 6m or not.  Takes some big antennas and power for that mode.  Guess you missed FAI as well.

73 John AF5CC
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K1XV
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2012, 08:05:39 PM »

If you are fortunate enough to be able to have a directional antenna for it, I would say 40 meters, now that the broadcasters have been displaced from frequencies under 7200 and the Europeans can operate up to 7200.   It used to be frustrating to try to work 40 m phone, listen to the DX below 7100, and have no legitimate way of attracting their attention other than the DX cluster.   Only now and then would they listen above 7125.

With a Steppir DB-36, the most exciting contacts are working Australia/Tasmania long path in the late afternoon when I can get through the wall of European calling stations.
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #19 on: September 18, 2012, 09:02:18 PM »

Interesting would be 6M But......
If I was stranded on an Island with only a single band Radio I would pick a 20M radio.  Why?
It's not as reliable as 40M but it's open most of the time both Day and Night while 40M is only open for long distances at night and those long distances are very dependent on having a really good Antenna and low QRN.

With 20M you can easily whip up a workable beam from simple material like even lengths of wood and wire and the seasonal QRN is not much of a problem.  Still its a toss up, I think 40M is better in some ways and 20M in others. 

I worked everywhere from Australia, Japan to Egypt on 20M with a G5RV and Australia, Japan and Kuwait etc. I could do on a regular basis.  On the other hand with my 3el 30/40 Steppir I find it to be hard on 40M to work Australia, Japan etc.  I have only done it a few dozen times over the last 3 years.

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YO9IRF
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« Reply #20 on: September 18, 2012, 11:48:45 PM »

40m is very reliable and is filled with close powerful stations that can be worked very easy, this qualifies it as the least interesting band of all; turn it on and talk is no challenge and gives no satisfaction.

20m is reliable enough and is better for long distance contacts, but being the most populated it isn't very interesting either.

What i really seem to like are the 17m and 15m bands: cleaner, less bad operators, good for long distance; 10m is even better while the SFI is high.
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KD8IZZ
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« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2012, 04:29:46 AM »

I'm very glad to hear all the good words about 40m. I've been a General class for 4 years and I just passed the Extra exam a couple days ago. I've listened below 7.175 but I finally get to use those frequencies. No beam, but my vertical should do well.
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N3QE
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« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2012, 06:15:41 AM »

40m is very reliable and is filled with close powerful stations that can be worked very easy, this qualifies it as the least interesting band of all; turn it on and talk is no challenge and gives no satisfaction.

20m is reliable enough and is better for long distance contacts, but being the most populated it isn't very interesting either.

What i really seem to like are the 17m and 15m bands: cleaner, less bad operators, good for long distance; 10m is even better while the SFI is high.

I think Europeans in particular do not have the fond memories of 40M that that some of us in other regions have. Only in the past couple years has the SW broadcasters mostly left (not entirely) that part of the spectrum. It really has helped.

40M is still at a disadvantage for phone users because the worldwide regional bandplans are so out of sync. In the bottom 25kc of 40M CW this isn't much of an issue but it is a big issue for phone users and even those trying to do CW in the sliver above 7025.
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NN3W
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Posts: 149




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« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2012, 06:45:56 AM »

I think there is a difference between "interesting" and "favorite". 

Favorite would have to be 40 as the combination of near worldwide propagation potential coupled with the fact that the number of "big" fish on 40 is less than on the high bands makes 40 much more pleasant to operate.

In terms of interesting, I'm going to have to go with 10.  Its really at the crossroads of VHF and HF.  Sporadic E, meteor scatter, aurora, backscatter, etc., all make their presence known here which really makes it unpredictable.  At the same time, it has all the qualities of a good HF band (when the MUF reaches that level) and is the host to some fantastic propagation paths - F2, Trans-eq, skew path, etc.
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NO2A
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Posts: 824




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« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2012, 12:53:23 PM »

When I started the thread I was thinking that 15m is the most interesting band.  Not the most reliable, not open the most, but the most interesting.  You sure get some surprise openings on it, like working 9V at 11am one June morning, or catching XW0X at 2:00pm in the ARRL Dx contest back in 2002.  Catching the E51 dxpedition recently at 9am on CW!  Unexpected things like that.  I also had a blast DXing on 15m during my novice days when I was limited to 21.1 to 21.2 CW on that band.

Anyone else love 15m?

John AF5CC


I agree. The first VK I ever worked was on 15 novice band. It is much more consistent than 10m. I like 17 and 40 also.
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K0YHV
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Posts: 179




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« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2012, 09:38:26 PM »

For some strange reason it took me 21 years to work VK on 15 meters!  Worked ZL on 15 when I was a novice, and had VK worked on 30m and 40m before 15m. Finally caught one on 15 in 2001.

John AF5CC
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K0YHV
Member

Posts: 179




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« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2012, 09:44:04 PM »

I think there is a difference between "interesting" and "favorite". 

Favorite would have to be 40 as the combination of near worldwide propagation potential coupled with the fact that the number of "big" fish on 40 is less than on the high bands makes 40 much more pleasant to operate.

In terms of interesting, I'm going to have to go with 10.  Its really at the crossroads of VHF and HF.  Sporadic E, meteor scatter, aurora, backscatter, etc., all make their presence known here which really makes it unpredictable.  At the same time, it has all the qualities of a good HF band (when the MUF reaches that level) and is the host to some fantastic propagation paths - F2, Trans-eq, skew path, etc.

I agree that 10m is very interesting as well as it is very close to the VHF region, and I am a VHF propagation fanatic.  Is aurora propagation possible on 10M? I don't think I have ever heard it on that band, and was wondering if it would go that low in frequency.  It sure is a fun propagation mode on 2m.

John AF5CC
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