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Author Topic: What would be the proper voltage for this air cleaner  (Read 3950 times)
KB1GTX
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« on: September 13, 2012, 01:03:15 PM »

I looking to replace the power supply,


http://i631.photobucket.com/albums/uu39/dav850/DSC00068.jpg
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KA4POL
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2012, 09:41:12 PM »

Could you post a picture of the identification plate? The one you posted really requires visionary qualities. Some more information would be helpful for finding the answer.

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KB3HG
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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2012, 01:41:41 AM »

Look for a model number and brand. I had to research the electronic air cleaner parts for a heating system. That one looks to be more  than 8 or 10. Price complete new units, a couple of years ago they were about 450.00.  I would be careful you are dealing with a high voltage > 1000 v probably closer to 6 KV  Check the interlock switches, the transformer resistance, clean the contacts. If the Filter elements are shorted from being dirty. That will cause problems also.

Tom
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KB1GTX
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« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2012, 12:23:28 PM »

There's nothing that i can find for a voltage on the web and yes it's the secondary that's open.

As for a power supply, they are easy to come by, but what voltage to use is the problem.

 
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AC5UP
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« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2012, 02:15:30 PM »

And the manufacturer is nameless or toes up?

From what I can tell the HV is not a critical value but more is better up to the point where cat dander makes it want to arc. 5 kV to 10 kV should be close enough to give your allergies a break, but if you research the specs on comparable models you should learn enough to make an educated guess............ (?)
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2012, 04:52:35 PM »

There's nothing that i can find for a voltage on the web and yes it's the secondary that's open.

As for a power supply, they are easy to come by, but what voltage to use is the problem.

 

Are you intentionally avoiding naming the brand and model number?

All sorts of resources available if this information is known.  I doubt if any are available if it isn't.
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KB1GTX
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« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2012, 04:59:46 PM »

Looking at the cell manufacturers, it's looking like 8kv is a good number @30ma or so and limit with some resistors,, now it's play time!  
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #7 on: September 15, 2012, 05:20:32 PM »

I looked at mine and it was 30kV at 30mA for our "whole house" system which is integrated into the HVAC.

No wonder my electric bill is high when that runs. Wink

I'd imagine portable units consume a lot less power if they are only covering one room.
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KB1GTX
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« Reply #8 on: September 15, 2012, 05:40:47 PM »

I saw that 30kv on the large cells,, they do work well and the air quality is amazing "if the cells get cleaned", but WoW what a stink when a spider gets in there!
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AC5UP
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« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2012, 06:04:56 PM »

No wonder my electric bill is high when that runs. Wink

Ja......... 30,000 x .03 = 900 Watts.

But, then I think to myself, just because the HV power supply is rated @ 30 mA does that mean it's drawing anywhere near that amount of current to hold an electrostatic charge on the filter plates? Like a charged filter capacitor draws next to nothing from a DC supply when there's no load, wouldn't an electrostatic filter behave in a similar way?

Hard for me to imagine that it takes the full 900 Watts to maintain a charge on the plates...........  ( ? )
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KA4POL
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« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2012, 09:48:49 PM »

Hard for me to imagine that it takes the full 900 Watts to maintain a charge on the plates...........  ( ? )
Aren't we hams used to measuring any more?
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KB3HG
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« Reply #11 on: September 16, 2012, 01:43:32 AM »

Wish I had a high voltage probe for tv work and I also suspect not a lot of guys have one laying around.  those levels of high voltage want to reach out and touch someone like Ma Bell.
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KG4RUL
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« Reply #12 on: September 16, 2012, 06:41:40 AM »

The problem is, if you replace the PS with anything other than one supplied by the manufacturer AND anything happens (the thing catches fire for instance), your insurance company may end up disowning you.
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KE3WD
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« Reply #13 on: September 16, 2012, 07:45:42 AM »

The problem is, if you replace the PS with anything other than one supplied by the manufacturer AND anything happens (the thing catches fire for instance), your insurance company may end up disowning you.

Be not afraid *grin*

If the supply is commercially mfd and plugs into an AC outlet and is UL listed, this is not likely to present a problem. 

From the physical size of the unit, just about any supply from about 7KV on up to 15KV should work. 


73
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W0BTU
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« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2012, 08:39:14 AM »

I repaired a unit like this a few years ago. In order for it to work, you need different voltages simultaneously applied to the correct places. I'm guessing on the exact voltages, but it worked something like the following:

 - There were ionizing (corona) wires with a negative HV in the air stream before the plates, about -8 kV. This charged the particulate matter (dust, pollen, mold, etc.) in the air so that the plates could capture them.

 - It had two different positive voltages applied to alternating plates, about +4 kV and +12 kV to grab and keep the dust.

The power supply was made by Honeywell, and was about $125. I just Googled the p/n on the PCB and found a distributor.
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