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Author Topic: CW Software (again)  (Read 6288 times)
KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« on: September 15, 2012, 02:40:59 PM »

I see TONS of software that have the computer generate morse code for you to copy.  Are there any good pieces of software out there that allow YOU to send code to the software for practice?
I have one program that does this, but it's got some serious timing errors.
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N4IAG
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Posts: 49




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« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2012, 05:08:44 PM »

Any of the code readers, free or paid, should work fine for this. CWget, CW decoder, MRP40, Fldigi, etc.

I wish more people would check their sending. They may be surprised at what they're actually sending. Wink
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I want to die peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming in terror like his passengers.
KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2012, 05:43:29 PM »

i like to blame the software for not copying what I send.. but I know the truth.. lol

I have used WD Morse, and I don't know if it's the USB<->RS232 adapter, or the software, but there's no rhyme or reason to why it will copy an 's' or 'eee'
and I've tried at deliberately low speed.. and as fast as I could concivably move my straight key *shrug*

I did find another nice software package.. but I have to re-wire my key <-> rs232 interface to use it. *doh*
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STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 873




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« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2012, 02:20:57 AM »

You may wish to consider making a simple audio oscillator, keying it, and feeding this into the mic/line-in of your PC.
A lot simpler than using RS232, and any audio morse copy program will work with audio input.
Or, if your rig has a CW sidetone, you could put the PC microphone near it.
This assumes, you can disable actual TX RF sending of course.

73 - Rob
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PA0BLAH
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2012, 05:01:02 AM »

You may wish to consider making a simple audio oscillator, keying it, and feeding this into the mic/line-in of your PC.
A lot simpler than using RS232, and any audio morse copy program will work with audio input.
Or, if your rig has a CW sidetone, you could put the PC microphone near it.
This assumes, you can disable actual TX RF sending of course.

73 - Rob

There are buzzers, you can take one from an old modem, when you put 4 or 5 volt on them they give a beeping tone. So that is easiest.
An old carbon microphone from a telephone, is an amplifying device. Put it in series with the telephone element of the same phone, with a battery and a key. When you press the key it makes a tone, because the sound of the phone element is picked up and amplified by the nearby carbon microphone. Shocked

When your sending is so unbelievable bad that even CWget shows your errors, you better exercise before polluting the air with your sigs.

However when contesting: no problem, "5nn tu" under the F knobs of your computer will make you the big gun. And that is what you possibly hopelessly need. Nice hobby we have, a real intellectual challenge, haven't we?

Bob
« Last Edit: September 16, 2012, 05:08:33 AM by PA0BLAH » Logged
KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2012, 06:39:29 PM »

the CW / RS232 interface is part of my Slow-Scan interface, so ordinarily, it's no problem.  i have to do some research to see if it will work.  the software says use pins 6  and 4.   I'm using one of those pins for the TX-Enable for mmSSTV.. so it may not even be feasible to swap them.  (WD Morse uses two other pins that mmSSTV doesn't, so they don't interfere with each other)

i suppose i could use the side tone osciallator of the radio.. it's a Kenwood TS-140s simple.. yet functional radio Smiley
i feed the Rx cw audio into the pc all the time.. when I come across a CW beacon that's too fast for me to copy, I use HamScope or something similar to decode it  Grin
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AG6WT
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Posts: 453




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« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2012, 06:37:16 AM »

I see TONS of software that have the computer generate morse code for you to copy.  Are there any good pieces of software out there that allow YOU to send code to the software for practice?
I have one program that does this, but it's got some serious timing errors.


If you have a iPhone or Android phone or tablet, there are few free decoders that you can try. I'm using Morse Code Reader on my Android phone and it works. I use the sidetone on my rig and put the phone near the speaker. The phone mic picks up my code and decodes it. It also shows the wave form of your sending so if it decodes the character incorrectly you can see if it is a problem with your timing, like making at dit too long for example.

The only problem I've found with this particular software is that you can't send very slow with it. I think it only works with characters sent around 15 wpm or higher. Send a character like "Q" too slow and it decodes it as "TTET".

Ray KJ6AMF
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KC8OYE
Member

Posts: 297




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« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2012, 11:01:57 AM »

I see TONS of software that have the computer generate morse code for you to copy.  Are there any good pieces of software out there that allow YOU to send code to the software for practice?
I have one program that does this, but it's got some serious timing errors.


If you have a iPhone or Android phone or tablet, there are few free decoders that you can try. I'm using Morse Code Reader on my Android phone and it works. I use the sidetone on my rig and put the phone near the speaker. The phone mic picks up my code and decodes it. It also shows the wave form of your sending so if it decodes the character incorrectly you can see if it is a problem with your timing, like making at dit too long for example.

The only problem I've found with this particular software is that you can't send very slow with it. I think it only works with characters sent around 15 wpm or higher. Send a character like "Q" too slow and it decodes it as "TTET".

Ray KJ6AMF

I have neither kind of phone.. and unfortunately, that's the kind of software I'm looking for..  I'd like some feed back beyond 'that's right' or 'that's wrong'.. something that can show what I'm doing wrong would be a huge help...
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N6GND
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Posts: 379




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« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2012, 03:39:23 PM »

Gee, this sounds like it's unnecessarily complicated. You can learn what good code sounds like just by listening to it. Do this for half-an-hour every day or so and you will quickly learn to discern easy-to-understand code from hard-to-understand code, both versions being within your level of speed competence. You will probably get to the point where you can tell whether code is well-sent or poorly-sent at speeds well above your ability to copy it.

This is how people learn to hear well-performed music vs poorly-performed music (like singing or playing off-key). This is how people learn new languages, whether it's a word, a phrase or many sentences. Your mind develops new neural connections as you use it. I doubt whether any series of electronic gizmos will change this process to make it easier or shorten it (I also don't believe in "sleep learning.")

When you have a sense of what sounds good, then you should be able to tell whether your sending is any good while you are sending. You can record your sending using whatever sound-recording gizmos you have lying around--your smartphone, a cassette recorder, a digital recorder, a dictation device or your computer.

Learning something new is "hard" because it uses real energy and uses actual metabolic resources. One thing about learning is to start slow. Listen to code for five minutes at a time to start. A few sessions of this and you will find yourself getting "into it" and spending half-an-hour or maybe an hour listening to QSOs.

Once you get "into it" you'll have no trouble telling what's good from what's not-so-good. You may even become a connoisseur of various types of "swing" sending which may not be precisely correct, but still are very clearly readible.
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VA7CPC
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Posts: 2387




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« Reply #9 on: September 17, 2012, 07:30:32 PM »

CWGet has a display of its incoming signal, and its "signal / silence" threshold.

So you get to _see_ the length of your dits and dahs as you send them.

It doesn't do any analysis, but you can develop a good eye for what's wrong, when it doesn't copy what you _thought_ you sent.

In the early days of landline (the _really_ early days), the operators used paper tape with a line on it -- up for "mark", down for "space" .   So you'd see something like this for "Q" (dahdahdidah):

          __________    _________     ___     _________
______                ___              ___     ___               __________

It's nice, because there's a permanent record of what actually got sent.

     Charles

PS -- I'm inclined to agree with a previous post.   After a while, you'll just _know_ what's wrong, because you'll have a good idea of what's _right_.   We did this work before computers . . .
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KC8OYE
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Posts: 297




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« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2012, 06:31:39 PM »

right on... guess i just need to figure something out with an antenna get my arse on the air... Smiley

i've set a reasonable (for me) goal of adding 3 characters per day to my cw practice.. I'm now up to 14 characters, at 13wpm.. I'm starting to see where i have problems at 13wpm Smiley 

funny enough, I had a job where we had to be able to hear an 8 or 12 digit part number once.. and remember it.  no writing it down, no asking for a repeat.  They spent a week with us on techniques for doing that. .and I've found those same skills are an amazing asset in copying CW.   as someone else posted .. when I'm copying along, and I stumble over a letter (Especially at the high speeds) i try to recover and keep going, but this is where my 'copy behind' skills come into play along with my number memory skills, and I'm actually able to 'store' the sound in my memory just long enough to get over my stumbled letter, grab the one I missed out of memory, and get caught back up.

it's part short term memory exercises, and part multi-tasking skills (being able to keep my ears on the code, while another part of my brain deals with the 'oops')

having 15+ years of 'touch typing' skills under my belt sorta helps too  Cool  actually wow.. it's a lot more than 15..  Huh good grief.. that was 20 years ago... man I'm getting old.. lol

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KK4CPH
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Posts: 154




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« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2012, 09:20:39 PM »

I wish more people would check their sending. They may be surprised at what they're actually sending. Wink

You're right.  I thought I might be ready to get on the air but I bought a MFJ-557 going thru FLDigi and all I can say is I'm glad I checked it.  I have some work to do.  I think my first CQ would have been answered with "QRT"   Grin

Eric
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GW3OQK
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Posts: 147




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« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2012, 04:39:44 AM »

A museum near me wanted to read CW on a computer and display it in LARGE LETTERS for the public to read at a distance. Any software out there can display a scrolling screen of large font? It would make witnessing amateur radio using morse a bit less boring.
73
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