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Author Topic: Modern HT and Transceivers with minimal menus  (Read 1217 times)
KE7RNK
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Posts: 10




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« on: December 13, 2014, 01:20:15 PM »

As I age ,I only enjoy menus in a restaurant. Please inform me of modern radios with minimal menus.
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AA4PB
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Posts: 13032




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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2014, 01:37:09 PM »

The Tentec Argonaut has no menus. There are plenty of other small QRP rigs that don't have menus. The problem is that minimal menus usually also means minimal features. The other option is a huge front panel full of buttons which would likely be more confusing than the menus. With so much being done in software these days providing plenty of features doesn't cost much if you don't have to provide a panel full of hardware controls for them.
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F8WBD
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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2014, 06:07:43 PM »

I can't think of any new QRO rig without a menu of some kind. Some have menus more involved than others. Used might be the menu-free Kenwood TS-120 and later TS-130. The hybrid series of Kenwoods are very good as long as you are willing to dip-and-load the final tubes. All of the mentioned have no menus but are getting a bit elderly.  Other than that, certain simple QRP rigs which are usually kits. Even new sophisticated QRP rigs have menus. My Elecraft K1, for example. Reason I like to use my simple OHR100A and Heath HW-8. But, the K1 gets the most use, despite the menu.
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W8JX
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« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2014, 06:36:18 PM »

As I age ,I only enjoy menus in a restaurant. Please inform me of modern radios with minimal menus.

Stay away from lower end Yaesu and Icon HF rigs as they are VERY menu dependent. On HT's if you get a single bander you will get least menus but they all have them. This is the age of microprocessor controlled rigs.
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You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
K8AXW
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« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2014, 08:31:41 PM »

RNK:  I'm with you OM!!  I just received an email from a buddy who is buying another rig, menu driven.  The instruction manual is 154 pages thick!  Menu after menu. 

I find the loading and dipping much easier on my old TS-830S much easier than trying to remember what menu and how deep to go to change one single parameter.  Especially if I'm away from the rig for more than 48 hours!

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G3RZP
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« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2014, 11:49:37 PM »

'AXW,

Plus the TS830 is VERY much cleaner on IMD - especially the splattering high order products - than the SS PAs on the market now!
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KB2FCV
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« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2014, 04:45:27 AM »

My icom 746 I can do pretty much everything I need to do without having to touch the menus. It's no longer a current / modern rig anymore
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SMAUG
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Posts: 91




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« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2014, 09:21:08 AM »

For a 2m HT, consider the Icom IC-V80. It does have SOME menus, but once programmed with your favorite freqs, you never need to venture there again.

Indeed, all modern, well-designed HTs are like this.

It's nice to have the features, just in case, but buried so that they're out of the way.
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Jeremy (KC9ZHE)
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"America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."
-Abraham Lincoln
NO2A
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« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2014, 05:04:40 PM »

With my TH-F6 Kenwood ht I rarely have to go into the menu for anything. Most everything is set and forget. Same goes for their hf rigs. They are the most user friendly brand I`ve ever used. Any ht you use will have menues,but they are far the simplest. After you initialy set the rig up you really never need to go into the menu.
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W8JX
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« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2014, 05:31:43 PM »

With my TH-F6 Kenwood ht I rarely have to go into the menu for anything. Most everything is set and forget. Same goes for their hf rigs. They are the most user friendly brand I`ve ever used. Any ht you use will have menues,but they are far the simplest. After you initialy set the rig up you really never need to go into the menu.

Its a decent HT but it is getting a bit dated. It has been out for many years.
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You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
W9KEY
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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2014, 10:22:19 AM »

The Tentec Argonaut has no menus.

true, the Argonaut VI is not overloaded with buttons and choices.
The T/M/B (top/middle/bottom) switch allows three options per button. 

- - - - - - - - - - - -


or, if you want a rig that puts out 100 watts: the Eagle probably also fits your criterion --



both are on sale: http://www.tentec.com/moving-sale/

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KC2QYM
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Posts: 135




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« Reply #11 on: December 15, 2014, 11:46:16 AM »

Just my opinion, I have two TS-820s and love them..I don't need or want anything beyond basic features in a radio and I certainly have no interest in computer interfacing for digital mode or digital anything.  The Kenwood TS-440 and TS-450 are also good choices as are many other pre 1990 radios of other brands such as the IC-735 for example.  You can buy really good older radios at great prices.  Why spend $2000 plus for a radio when an older, solid radio can be had at $500?  If you have $2000 you can buy four radios and have plenty of backup and fun with the different rigs.
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SMAUG
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Posts: 91




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« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2014, 12:47:22 PM »

Its (re. Kenwood TH-F6A) a decent HT but it is getting a bit dated. It has been out for many years.

Maybe more to the point, let's recall that the reason such a dated design is still in production is that it still sells like hotcakes because it is still relevant.

This radio has one menu, and all the common features are accessible via the keypad with or without the 'F' key.

I have one too, and I love it. It was easily my best ham radio purchase.

Also, KE7RNK may not necessarily care if the design is dated, since a lack of menus seems to be the main consideration.
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Jeremy (KC9ZHE)
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"America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves."
-Abraham Lincoln
KJ6ZOL
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Posts: 415




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« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2014, 06:46:49 PM »

Just my opinion, I have two TS-820s and love them..I don't need or want anything beyond basic features in a radio and I certainly have no interest in computer interfacing for digital mode or digital anything.  The Kenwood TS-440 and TS-450 are also good choices as are many other pre 1990 radios of other brands such as the IC-735 for example.  You can buy really good older radios at great prices.  Why spend $2000 plus for a radio when an older, solid radio can be had at $500?  If you have $2000 you can buy four radios and have plenty of backup and fun with the different rigs.

When I first got my ticket, I was given a TS-130, mentioned by another poster. Nice rig, did everything I was interested in (mostly SSB phone) and was easy to use. Eventually the RF board blew and I sold it on Ebay to a guy in Chicago who had a parts rig. He got it working fine. Next, I bought a IC-735 for $375 from a guy who had had his van stolen and was selling everything he owned including the kitchen sink to try and buy another one, since he lived in an area with no bus service. The 735 is a bit more modern and doesn't have the switch and relay issues that the early Kenwoods do, for which parts are practically unobtainium, and so are techs who know how to fix them. Most of the Icoms will interface with a PC, you can buy cables for such on Ebay. My 735 has an issue with the HAM button (used to switch between ham bands) sticking, so I just hold it in with my thumb enough for it to connect but not stick while changing bands. As for HT's, Chirp will program Baofeng and Wouxun rigs easily. Some Baofengs are being sold preset to Chinese, and you have to scroll through the menus until you find the language setting (the manual is in Chinese too, so no help there).
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