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Author Topic: Johnson Viking I  (Read 2839 times)
N4NYY
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« on: September 20, 2012, 04:42:35 PM »

At our club hamfest last Sunday, someone had for sale a Johnson Viking I in outrageous condition, with manual and warranty card. He sold it for $200, to a flipper, who then put it up on sale for $325 about 200 feet away. Do not know it if worked, but the main tuning knob had a click from mis-alignment. I could not see the source of the click.

Nonetheless, it was a very nice unit.
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KA5N
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2012, 04:57:42 AM »

A Viking I is much like a Viking II, except the final is a single 4D32 instead of two 6146's and the  Viking II has a lot of TVI "prevention" added.  The Viking I sold for a bit over $ 200 when
new.  With today's TV system TVI suppression isn't the problem it once was.  So which is the
more desirable transmitter?  Sort of a toss up.  A I in prestine condition would be my choice.
But if physical condition wasn't a factor and what one wanted was a good AM rig, not that
much difference.  Tubes are available for either, price varies over time.

A flipper?  I thought for a moment that you were at sea world.
Yo  vinnie!
Allen KA5N
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N4NYY
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2012, 05:36:58 AM »


Quote
A flipper?  I thought for a moment that you were at sea world.

Believe me, I see this a lot. Vendors buying equipment and flipping it right at that hamfest.
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N8CMQ
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2012, 09:20:15 PM »

The last swap I went to had a row of boat anchors of different eras, but the more than new price tags turned me off.
Sell it on ebay if you want ebay prices...
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N4NYY
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« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2012, 04:53:06 AM »

The last swap I went to had a row of boat anchors of different eras, but the more than new price tags turned me off.
Sell it on ebay if you want ebay prices...

I had an old AM BC radio for restoration that I was just not going to get to, so I was dumping it for $10. I cannot tell you how often someone with a smartphone looked for it on ebay to see what they can get if they flipped it.
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N8CMQ
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« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2012, 12:36:16 PM »

The last swap I went to had a row of boat anchors of different eras, but the more than new price tags turned me off.
Sell it on ebay if you want ebay prices...

I had an old AM BC radio for restoration that I was just not going to get to, so I was dumping it for $10. I cannot tell you how often someone with a smartphone looked for it on ebay to see what they can get if they flipped it.

My BC/SW Zenith is out in the wood shed falling apart. Too many projects...
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WB2WIK
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« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2012, 05:45:24 PM »

Having already owned and used a Viking I when it was much newer (in 1966), today I wouldn't pay five dollars for one.

What a P.O.S. TVI-generator!

If one is found in "like new, mint" condx, it's probably worth quite a lot to a "collector."  Not to use on the air, but to look at and display.



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W8JI
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« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2012, 04:43:58 AM »

Having already owned and used a Viking I when it was much newer (in 1966), today I wouldn't pay five dollars for one.

What a P.O.S. TVI-generator!

If one is found in "like new, mint" condx, it's probably worth quite a lot to a "collector."  Not to use on the air, but to look at and display.





I swept the TVI filters in my Valiant and they apparently do as much harm as good.

Most of the TVI radiation from my Valaiant came from the tuning capacitor shaft. I never could figure out why the hell they floated the capacitor on insulators. I guess a carry over from breadboard wiring.

http://www.w8ji.com/johnson_vfo_chirp_jump.htm

Weird, isn't it?

Also, if you bypass the control grids of the driver and PA to chassis with 10 pF caps VHF harmonics go way down in level.

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N4NYY
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Posts: 4742




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« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2012, 12:12:41 PM »

Having already owned and used a Viking I when it was much newer (in 1966), today I wouldn't pay five dollars for one.

What a P.O.S. TVI-generator!

If one is found in "like new, mint" condx, it's probably worth quite a lot to a "collector."  Not to use on the air, but to look at and display.






Quick question on today' LCD HD TVs. Even with digital and coax shielding, are these TVs worse because of no shielding and wideband receivers? Or would a rig like this have minimal impact on a newer TV?

I swept the TVI filters in my Valiant and they apparently do as much harm as good.

Most of the TVI radiation from my Valaiant came from the tuning capacitor shaft. I never could figure out why the hell they floated the capacitor on insulators. I guess a carry over from breadboard wiring.

http://www.w8ji.com/johnson_vfo_chirp_jump.htm

Weird, isn't it?

Also, if you bypass the control grids of the driver and PA to chassis with 10 pF caps VHF harmonics go way down in level.


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AC5UP
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« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2012, 12:52:05 PM »

Even with digital and coax shielding, are these TVs worse because of no shielding and wideband receivers? Or would a rig like this have minimal impact on a newer TV?

There is no good answer to that as it's a conditional question... Is the TV receiving an off air / satellite / cable signal or playing downloaded files from the web? In the case of an off-air signal, the RF side is either Hi-Band VHF or UHF and TVI will show as dropped bits in the stream. The picture will pause, resume, pause, resume and look much like an antenna or thunderstorm issue. Which depends somewhat on the antenna orientation... If it's a highly directional antenna like a dual-bay bowtie with a reflector screen any TVI off the back of the antenna will be heavily attenuated. Do a 180 and now you're wondering what the VHF parasitics look like on the Viking and how well the HF antenna radiates them.

In the case of satellite or DVR usage, an LED TV would need to be very close to an offending signal for it to come in through the power supply, peripheral cable or PC board. I'd think that would be extremely unlikely.

In any case, while it's cool to think of nostalgia night with a BA transmitter glowing in the dark and tuned to the AM window on 75 Meters, there should be some consideration to 'good engineering practices' as understood today. Just 'cuz the rig was state of the art in 1955 doesn't mean it's a welcome guest on the bandz today. Last week 10 was open and I was tuning around the lowest portion when I came across a CW signal that was at least 1 KC wide if not wider.

How so?  The mutha' of all chirps............. 

Which I have to admit did make tuning the signal easier. I didn't need to zero-beat, just pick a spot nearby and at least part of every keyed element would come to me.   Grin
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N4NYY
Member

Posts: 4742




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« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2012, 03:51:17 PM »

Even with digital and coax shielding, are these TVs worse because of no shielding and wideband receivers? Or would a rig like this have minimal impact on a newer TV?

There is no good answer to that as it's a conditional question... Is the TV receiving an off air / satellite / cable signal or playing downloaded files from the web? In the case of an off-air signal, the RF side is either Hi-Band VHF or UHF and TVI will show as dropped bits in the stream. The picture will pause, resume, pause, resume and look much like an antenna or thunderstorm issue. Which depends somewhat on the antenna orientation... If it's a highly directional antenna like a dual-bay bowtie with a reflector screen any TVI off the back of the antenna will be heavily attenuated. Do a 180 and now you're wondering what the VHF parasitics look like on the Viking and how well the HF antenna radiates them.

In the case of satellite or DVR usage, an LED TV would need to be very close to an offending signal for it to come in through the power supply, peripheral cable or PC board. I'd think that would be extremely unlikely.

In any case, while it's cool to think of nostalgia night with a BA transmitter glowing in the dark and tuned to the AM window on 75 Meters, there should be some consideration to 'good engineering practices' as understood today. Just 'cuz the rig was state of the art in 1955 doesn't mean it's a welcome guest on the bandz today. Last week 10 was open and I was tuning around the lowest portion when I came across a CW signal that was at least 1 KC wide if not wider.

How so?  The mutha' of all chirps............. 

Which I have to admit did make tuning the signal easier. I didn't need to zero-beat, just pick a spot nearby and at least part of every keyed element would come to me.   Grin

Just get a 40M antenna so I can talk to you.
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