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Author Topic: How Do I Program SAR Freqs Into My Yaseau FT-2600M  (Read 11563 times)
KT0DD
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Posts: 277




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« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2012, 08:51:01 AM »

I love the guys who use the word freedom. We are not "free". We are allowed certain liberties and priveledges by the government within the law. True freedom is without any control or consequences. we do not have this in our country.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6034




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« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2012, 04:48:57 AM »

How true that is.  Step on the wrong toes and see how fast your 'freedom' ends.

Just as an exercise, I'll go into one way that you can be caught and fined.  Part 90 radios are usually more selective when transmitting.  That is the transmission frequency is more precise--and narrower--than a transmission from an amateur rig would be.  Now, you may say "So what?"  This is the so what.  

Anyone operating on an adjacent frequency would probably be splattered by your illegal transmission through your amateur rig.  Being a public service frequency, any complaint would be just about immediately investigated through monitoring.  The monitoring station hears you and varys it receive frequency so that they hear you clearly.  When you or any of your associates are IDing on that frequency, you give them a point to zero in on--and they will.  

Here come the FCC monitoring people, knocking on your agency's door, and demanding to see the list of people authorized to work on that frequency.  Now they come knocking on YOUR door and asking to see your radio equipment--something that you MUST allow them to do because of your association with the SAR people you work with--and they find the rig that you're using.  The old fallback excuse that 'you didn't know' isn't going to hold water because of your association with SAR.  They're going to tell you that you should have--and both you and the team you work with end up with nice little letters and fines for doing what you should have known better not to do.

Go ahead and laugh--it's happened more often than you think, and in a very short time period as well--a couple of days.  When it comes to public service frequencies, the FCC are faster--a LOT faster--on their policing than they ever would be on any amateur frequency.
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2371




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« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2012, 11:38:31 PM »

I've been in SAR groups over the years and all of them fortunately strongly enforced rules against use of modified ham gear.

Many hams think the freedom we enjoy can be extended with a wink and a nudge to other services.  They can't.

While the FCC has a hands-off approach to the ham bands, that is NOT true about the public service bands.  Going back well over 25  years the FCC has actively prosecuted violators even among ham volunteers to SAR groups, law enforcement and fire/rescue agencies. 

When the FCC gets done you will have to deal with the supported agency that is really ticked off that you brought the Feds down on their heads.

Yes it is inconvenient and expensive.  But you will be legal and have better performing gear for it.
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K5BBC
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Posts: 21




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« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2013, 03:29:15 PM »

A solution, and it's HAM freq. legal.

http://www.powerwerx.com/two-way-radios/mobile-radios/db-750x-dual-band-commercial-mobile.html
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6034




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« Reply #19 on: August 06, 2013, 05:19:29 AM »


Possibly, but just remember that this is a brand new rig, probably coming out of China, and VERY probably using parts and components that were rejected by the QC branches of the big three in Japan.  It's been well known for many years now that the Chinese factories have bought rejected electronic parts and used them in their consumer electronics.  You get what you pay for, and if you don't pay too much, don't expect to get a quality, reliable, long lasting item!  

With the experiences of some people that have been posted here, would you really want to depend on a rig that may or may not let go when you need it most?  Something else--the manual for this rig specifically cautions against high power extended operation, something that may well be needed for SAR activities.  Is that an indication of a dependable rig?  Not to me it isn't!

Realistically, with SAR participation, you've got to be able to depend on the radio set that you use, and this unit has not been around enough to determine how reliable it is.  But it's cousins have--the cheap HTs out of China.  

Yes, it's not inexpensive to get, but if you're going to be depending on that rig in instances that may well mean life or death to someone, you want a rig that you can absolutely be sure will work reliably--a commercial public service rig.

For further discussions about the Chinese rigs, their inexpensiveness and especially their possible reliability, the following threads may be of interest:

In the 'Emergency Communications' forum:  "UV-5R FOR PART 90 FIRE DEPT USAGE"

In the 'Mods and Repairs' forum:  "Wouxun KGUV6D V2 HT Flashlight LED Voltage?"
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K6CPO
Member

Posts: 151




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« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2013, 11:17:49 AM »

How true that is.  Step on the wrong toes and see how fast your 'freedom' ends.

Just as an exercise, I'll go into one way that you can be caught and fined.  Part 90 radios are usually more selective when transmitting.  That is the transmission frequency is more precise--and narrower--than a transmission from an amateur rig would be.  Now, you may say "So what?"  This is the so what.  

Anyone operating on an adjacent frequency would probably be splattered by your illegal transmission through your amateur rig.  Being a public service frequency, any complaint would be just about immediately investigated through monitoring.  The monitoring station hears you and varys it receive frequency so that they hear you clearly.  When you or any of your associates are IDing on that frequency, you give them a point to zero in on--and they will.  

Here come the FCC monitoring people, knocking on your agency's door, and demanding to see the list of people authorized to work on that frequency.  Now they come knocking on YOUR door and asking to see your radio equipment--something that you MUST allow them to do because of your association with the SAR people you work with--and they find the rig that you're using.  The old fallback excuse that 'you didn't know' isn't going to hold water because of your association with SAR.  They're going to tell you that you should have--and both you and the team you work with end up with nice little letters and fines for doing what you should have known better not to do.

Go ahead and laugh--it's happened more often than you think, and in a very short time period as well--a couple of days.  When it comes to public service frequencies, the FCC are faster--a LOT faster--on their policing than they ever would be on any amateur frequency.

This is even more important since January 1, 2013.  That was when the FCC mandate for narrow-banding on the Land Mobile Radio Service went into effect.  This means that any radio used in that service has to have a bandwidth of 12.5 kHz rather than the 25 kHz it was before.  I'm not sure how many, if any, radios certified for Part 97 are capable of this, especially the older ones.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




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« Reply #21 on: August 11, 2013, 08:30:51 AM »

Supposedly this radio is part 90 certified, which means that it does have the narrowband limitation built in.  The way these chips can be programmed, (I do believe that this radio is SDR based just like most of the Chinese HTs are) there is no problem having the now standard (for the amateur service) 25 khz bandwidth and the standard 12.5 khz bandwidth for the other bands that the radio is capable of.

Here is the link for the user manual which gives the specs.

http://www.powerwerx.com/download/DB-750X-User-Manual.pdf

The frequency specs are on page 6 (~) when viewed with a PDF viewer.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2013, 08:57:02 AM by K1CJS » Logged
K5BBC
Member

Posts: 21




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« Reply #22 on: August 12, 2013, 08:32:23 PM »

 Something else--the manual for this rig specifically cautions against high power extended operation

I don't see this statement anywhere in the manual. There is a mention/caution of extended crossband use above 10 watt.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




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« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2013, 05:01:53 AM »

I don't see this statement anywhere in the manual. There is a mention/caution of extended crossband use above 10 watt.

Look again on page 3, under the cautions.  I quote the last item:

Quote
Do not transmit in the high power mode for extended periods of time as it may overheat the radio. For longer transmit key downs, it is recommended you use the “MID1” or “MID2” medium power level settings.

For those that actually read the manual before they use the radio, (I admit that sometimes I don't, but I usually look at the manual before I buy) this is one of the first things they see.  Also, if the company didn't consider it important, why was it said at all?  Then why the additional caution later on about high power crossband operation?  Too many whys and cautions, if you ask me.

Now, if the radio is built to "rugged commercial radio standards" as is claimed on the same page, it should be able to be used without the need to worry about extended key down transmissions.  THAT is why I question the ruggedness of the radio and the quality of the parts.  73.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2013, 05:15:41 AM by K1CJS » Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




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« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2013, 07:30:14 AM »

BTW, this discussion now ties into the thread "Powerwerx DB-750X" in this same forum.  73.
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