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Author Topic: Where to call CQ? (QRS)  (Read 555 times)
K9JH
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Posts: 49




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« on: April 18, 2008, 08:06:13 AM »

I am new to CW and trying to make one QSO a night right now.  I am an extra class, but staying in the technician bands to find slow ops like me!

What is etiquette on the bands?  I usally hear most activity at the bottom of the band with the top of the band being quiet.  Is it it more polite for the slower ops to be higher in the band?

How about band choice?  I have been trying 80m and 40m because they have technician bands?  Would 160m and 30m be a place for a beginner?

Thanks for the help.

K9JH
James
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NG0K
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Posts: 334




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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2008, 08:55:36 AM »

You can call CQ anywhere at slower speeds and get a lot of calls.  But the speeds generally decrease as you go higher in the band.   I ragchew around 15wpm most of the time and generally stay around 40khz to 60khz up from the bottom of the bands except for 30m.

73, Doug
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73, Doug - NG0K
N3QE
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Posts: 2341




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« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2008, 09:06:12 AM »

30, 40, 50 kc from the bottom of the band you'll find somebody to work. You might accidentally pick a net frequency and get chastised for QRM'ing there, but usually they'll be polite about telling you to move off. There are "QRP calling frequencies" in there were there are folks very regularly listening (even if they aren't talking). The QRP'ers are generally very good operators and will slow down to work you, and if you pick up their operating habits you will very much come out ahead in terms of skills.

Certain chunks of 40M don't get as much use as you'd think, especially in the evenings, because at least here on the East Coast of the US there's intense QRM from SW broadcasters and SW pirates there. You might not hear them as much in 9-land, and they might not matter at all further west.

I personally believe that it's our duty as hams to QRM the SW broadcasters that occupy our spectrum, and encourage you to walk all over them :-). Look for me in their sidebands!
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K7UNZ
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Posts: 691




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« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2008, 09:45:39 AM »

Hi James!

Glad to have you doing the CW thing, you won't regret it!

30 meters is a delight for the CW op, and you'll find everything you need to feel comfortable there.

Most of the action runs up to about 10.120 (+/-)with an assortment of digital ham/commercial/military/etc. after that.  Remember, 30 is a shared band and we Yanks have "secondary" use of it.  You will hear just about everything at one time or other, anywhere on the band (hi).

Kind of poops-out at night, but a good band to get your feet wet and have fun doing it.  Surprise openings throughout the night, too!

73, see ya there....

Jim/k7unz

 
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N8UZE
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Posts: 1524




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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2008, 09:46:53 AM »

Check out the FISTS website.  They have "calling" frequencies and there is often someone listening on them who will respond to your CQ.
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WW5AA
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Posts: 2086




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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2008, 10:10:49 AM »

And don't forget the supposedly dead bands. Last Sunday afternoon I tuned through the 10 meter band several times and didn't hear a single signal. I put out two rounds of CQ and worked W6, KH6, V31, almost had a pile up!

73 de Lindy
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N0NS
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Posts: 45




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« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2008, 12:37:33 PM »

You can call CQ at a slow speed anywhere you want.  The only things I would keep in mind is that if you don't plan on calling CQ DX, try to stay above 10KHz above the bottom portion of the band.  Nobody is going to bust your chops for sending CW slowly.

I personally like to call CQ above the extra class portion of the band in hopes of having more people call me.

On 80, I will call CQ anywhere between 3.525 and about 3.565MHz depending on how good propagation is.

On 40, I usually find that I have good luck between 7.040 and 7.065.  I like to call CQ in the 7.060-7.070 range but often hear the OPS who have sideband privileges.  I have tried to call CQ up near 7.090 but it is like a ghost town up there and I have yet to make a contact.

Good luck!  Joe N0NS
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TG9ADM
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Posts: 10




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« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2008, 07:24:24 PM »

James,
There is slow CW activity arround 7.125 Mhz. When I got my novice ticket, I used to call CQ on that segment and was able to work many U.S. novice stations. Sometimes I had to move some KHz up/down to avoid carriers from shortwave stations.

However, when I'm calling CQ and someone comes back at low speed, I also reduce my keying speed (with no complaints from my straight key) like many other CW OPS on the band.

73!

Dante
TG9ADM
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KI6FEN
Member

Posts: 7




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« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2008, 09:41:29 PM »

I never hear slow speed cw, say around 5-10 wpm.  I'd definitely qso with someone going that slow.  I just never hear them.  I check 7.120 from time to time, nothing.

As everyone says...as soon as you can tap out the letters at any speed just jump on and start doing it.

Here is a great event for new cw'ers:
http://www.fists.org/getfeetwet.html

Should be a weekly event, not yearly!
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9921




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« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2008, 10:42:49 PM »

fists
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