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Author Topic: IDing and talking to people, new to VHF  (Read 5009 times)
KE1JR
Member

Posts: 17




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« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2012, 04:56:26 AM »

I checked into the net last night, net controller was nice and I was welcomed in, he even invited me to run the net in the future if I wanted, my fear was for naught. Hopefully I'll be able to make some friends on the radio and maybe at the club.  Thanks.

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N5TWB
Member

Posts: 30




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« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2012, 02:00:08 PM »

Good job - as a 1x/month ARES net controller, I know I always appreciate new check-ins. Let us know how it goes after a visit to the club meeting, too.
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N0FPE
Member

Posts: 356




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« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2012, 07:20:51 AM »

Shovels have handles...people have names
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KK4IKO
Member

Posts: 67




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« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2012, 03:17:10 AM »

I never found that folks were unwilling to talk if they were on the air. but being polite and waiting for a break to say your call sign is important.

The first time I got my new license on the air (last May), I was tuning through the VHF band when I stumbled upon several folks ragchewing.  I listened until there was a break, gave my callsign, and found I was covered up with people wanting to chat.  I explained I was a newbie, so they were patient with me.  I asked where they calling from, and discovered I was on a repeater 80 miles from my location.  I was located at 5500' with a clear shot in that direction.  I figured a first contact might be easier from a high vantage point.  Interestingly, the local repeater, 3 miles away and higher still, was as silent as a tomb.

I live in the mountains of western North Carolina, so hooking into the various repeaters can be a challenge, sometimes.  A half mile change in location, or a few hundred feet elevation makes all the difference.

In a couple weeks, I'm taking part with my local club in a Race Net.  It's a 16 mile mini marathon (all uphill).  It will be an interesting experience.

Bruce, KK4IKO
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