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Author Topic: Is there a healthy number of new cw ops?  (Read 10978 times)
AE4RV
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« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2012, 07:05:46 AM »

From a SWL / monitor's perspective, I think CW is pretty healthy.  When you compare the number of CW stations on the ham bands to the number of ops of other data modes (RTTY, Fax, etc.) CW is doing o.k.

This.

I think everyone would agree that PSK is a healthy mode, but listen to the bands. There are many more CW QSOs.
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SM4XUW
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« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2012, 10:36:33 AM »

Hi all!

I'm 32 years old and been a ham half of my life.
If I check my log 99% of the QSO;s are in CW.
It was the interest of telegraphy as a young teen that led me in to ham radio. I still remember when I first heard about this hobby, and the use of morse code !
This must have been around 1993 to 94.
After a couple of trips to the library to get hold of all the books they had about ham radio and morse code tapes the studying began!

It was hard studying alone and a lot of other things came in the way!! Home work, girls,music etc

But I didn't give up an in 96  I finally got my first licence!
In 1999 it was time to do the military service and I got to be an shortwave radio op handling  mostly CW traffic. Grin

I have had a couple of no code hams close to my age visiting me and they have a general interest in CW and are willing to learn it.
So I think there will be new ops on the bands pounding away on their
keys fore at least 35 to 40 years!

Long live the code ! It's unbeatable 

 
   
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STAYVERTICAL
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« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2012, 03:11:03 PM »

I would agree that CW is alive and well today, and should continue that way if the trend continues.

CW has moved from a mode, to an art, in this day and age.
The CW sections of the band are much more crowded than even the PSK31 band segments in my experience.
A few weeks ago, I made a call and spent the next 3 hours working a pileup from all over the globe.
This rarely happens to me on PSK31.

ZL1DAB, so very true.
Radio Officers actually transitioned to Electronics Officers when I was doing my training.
Two years full time, 40 hours a week, with a two week Christmas break.
We were responsible for most of the electronics on board, excepting some engine control systems.
Other than engine control, we would do repairs at sea of everything else.
Radars, Echo sounders, Loran, Direction finder, Shipboard RF distribution system, Lifeboat equipment, and of course the comms gear.

The pressure was sometimes intense.
One time, with a Pilot boarding the vessel, I just managed to get the radar needed for Pilotage repaired.
Failure would have meant losing our spot to enter Incheon harbour since the submarine nets and Locks needed to be navigated.
Radio Officers duties changed as technology advanced, until finally GMDSS took most of us out.
Radio Officers, Flight Engineers, Navigators - all gone due to technology.

But no one knows the future.
As the complexity of our technology increases, the scope for massive failure increases.
One big 1859 type solar flare could bring down the whole artifice.
As a species we are making ourselves occupy a smaller and smaller ecological niche based on high technology doing the brainwork.
If that niche becomes seriously disrupted, we will have to seek other, broader and simpler niche's.
Perhaps CW will be there to fill a need.

73 - Rob
 
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KD8SAV
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Posts: 4




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« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2012, 08:36:34 PM »

I know I like CW because I've got a 100 watt transceiver and an MFJ-1625 Windowsill antenna up only 10 feet.

I've worked a few SSB stations, but SSB is not for weak signal work.

On CW I've been able to work 58 countries since I got back on the air in July, a lot with stations that didn't even move the S meter. CW is great for someone who doesn't have a beam up 40 ft, or even a dipole.

I also chose CW because I was a Navy S/S Operator, but have found over the years I have enjoyed the challenge of working a weak signal at almost noise level, and the concentration it takes to do that.
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ZL1BBW
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Posts: 371




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« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2012, 09:17:17 PM »

I would agree that CW is alive and well today, and should continue that way if the trend continues.


ZL1DAB, so very true.
Radio Officers actually transitioned to Electronics Officers when I was doing my training.
Two years full time, 40 hours a week, with a two week Christmas break.
We were responsible for most of the electronics on board, excepting some engine control systems.
Other than engine control, we would do repairs at sea of everything else.
Radars, Echo sounders, Loran, Direction finder, Shipboard RF distribution system, Lifeboat equipment, and of course the comms gear.

The pressure was sometimes intense.
One time, with a Pilot boarding the vessel, I just managed to get the radar needed for Pilotage repaired.
Failure would have meant losing our spot to enter Incheon harbour since the submarine nets and Locks needed to be navigated.
Radio Officers duties changed as technology advanced, until finally GMDSS took most of us out.
Radio Officers, Flight Engineers, Navigators - all gone due to technology.



73 - Rob
 


When I came to retrain (midlife crisis) my maritime qual's were accepted as degree equivalent (lucky) and this allowed me to do a Post Grad qualification.

I have just got up my 80M dipole, so will be QRV again on the end of 80 and 40.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
STAYVERTICAL
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Posts: 859




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« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2012, 12:52:16 AM »

Quote
When I came to retrain (midlife crisis) my maritime qual's were accepted as degree equivalent (lucky) and this allowed me to do a Post Grad qualification.

I have just got up my 80M dipole, so will be QRV again on the end of 80 and 40.

Excellent on the academic success!
Yes, I bailed out well before the hammer came down as well.
I went into the newly growing computer industry, before microcomputers - it was a great era to be in.
When microcomputers turned the computer industry into a commodity, I again bailed and went into the financial arena.
Then ... bailed again.

The trick is to stay on the crest of the wave, but not be there when it breaks.
Currently retired, but was quite young when I did, so I hope to be QRM on the CW segments for a long time yet!

In some ways CW is like a virus, changing hosts to stay alive.
First it inhabited telegraph lines, jumped to oceanic cables, then to radio transmitters, and now you even find it in TCP/IP packets.
I just remembered! - it has now gone off planet to Mars, in the form of CW tread impressions in the martian soil - spooky!
Like Mark Twain is reputed to have quipped " Reports of my death are greatly exaggerated".

73 - Rob


« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 01:05:15 AM by STAYVERTICAL » Logged
W1JKA
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Posts: 1631




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« Reply #21 on: October 06, 2012, 03:15:53 PM »

    My way of keeping CW alive for the future,teach your children or in my case grand children the code(a secret language) then sit back and watch them text with it on their ever present cell phones with their special friends that they have taught it to.It works and who knows,a few may become hams someday.No,cw will not be dying anytime soon,just get off the phone section of the band or try to have a decent cw qso during the weekend cw contest.I think in some countries like Italy it is against the law to get rid of cw anyway HI.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2012, 03:30:16 PM by W1JKA » Logged
N3QE
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Posts: 2163




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« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2012, 05:22:41 AM »

I'm not that old either (45; been a ham since I was 10) and I find that many of the new CW contesters and DX'ers are not only half my age, they're better at CW than I am or I ever was.

All are capable of casual ragchews but most tend to go strongly for more intense activity like contesting or DX'ing.
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S51M
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2012, 12:04:01 PM »

Short and very simply CW QSO's without any content and even with help of the PC? No, thanks!
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M0LEP
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Posts: 206




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« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2012, 04:45:20 PM »

For someone new to Morse, short simple QSOs are a good way to start. There's no point trying to sprint before you can crawl...
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WA8IUR
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Posts: 16




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« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2012, 01:41:17 PM »

WILL BE 62 IN A MONTH. STILL USE CW AND SSB. DX IS MORE FUN WITH CW SOMETIMES SINCE YOU ELIMINATE ACCENTS. HOWEVER, BAD FISTS CAN BE WORSE. GOOD LUCK AND WILL LOOK FOR YOU , TIM
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AB9NZ
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Posts: 176




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« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2012, 05:54:09 PM »

In this month's QST I counted more than 300 silent keys, DX hams don't live forever either. I sure hope enough new ops are coming on board to hold ground. 73 de Tom, ab9nz
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N2IW
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Posts: 7




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« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2012, 09:29:44 PM »

I'm 36 years old, and a no code Extra, I got my US. license this March. I'm from China and was a 3rd class Ham in China, but never took a code test there. I have tried every wrong way to learn morse, and I think no one learns Morse code longer than me and with no success  Grin Grin Grin  but I never give up, until recently I can finally copy about 17-20wpm, and send at 17 wpm, but never have a CW QSO until today (actually it was yesterday)

I heard HT9H calling CQ at about 25 wpm on 17 meters and he does short 5x9 73 TU kind of QSOs, he was so strong, so although my antenna is just a 4 feet whip on my car, (I use some RG-8x to get it to my apartment)  I decided to give him a call , I decided to send at 13 wpm, with a lot of errors I sent " HT9H de N2IW N2IW k" two seconds later he replied to me at about 15 wpm and we have a very short and exiting QSO ( for me of course  Wink )

Sorry for my crappy English Cheesy
« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 09:34:09 PM by N2IW » Logged
AB9NZ
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Posts: 176




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« Reply #28 on: October 11, 2012, 06:38:02 AM »

James, your English is fine. I read your biography on that other ham site. You are doing everything right. Anybody can download ham Radio Deluxe, but to make the investment that you have made in this hobby will bring a lifetime of joy. You're another shining example of the high quality people drawn to telegraphy. Welcome to America and welcome to cw.
             Very best of 73 de Tom, AB9NZ
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NO2A
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Posts: 769




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« Reply #29 on: October 11, 2012, 11:02:23 AM »

I can be found anywhere on the cw bands. The old novice portion of 40m has been great for slow speed qso`s. I`m curious what it will be like in 20-30 years. Can you imagine saying,"How`s that old TS-590S of yours doing?"
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