Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: antenna building materials  (Read 2676 times)
KC9PNN
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« on: October 02, 2012, 06:29:55 AM »

what are good materials to build antennas with  Smiley
Logged

tim kc9pnn
W9GB
Member

Posts: 2659




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2012, 06:37:28 AM »

Conductive metals, such as Aluminum and Copper, are frequent choices.
For larger Multi-element antennas, aluminum tubing is used -- a compromise to deal with WEIGHT as another requirement.

Insulating materials, range from wood, to plastics, glass, and ceramics.

WHAT type of antenna do you desire to build -- OR -- Is this a salvage yard / scrap scavenger list?
Logged
KC9PNN
Member

Posts: 13




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2012, 07:51:20 AM »

i have a kenwood tr9130 i would like to make a 2meter beam for ssb
Logged

tim kc9pnn
WA8UEG
Member

Posts: 399




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2012, 08:17:12 AM »

Just google "home brew 2 meter beam" There are hundreds to choose from, most very inexpensive and easy to build complete with parts list.
Logged
WB6BYU
Member

Posts: 13580




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2012, 09:21:23 AM »

I use PVC pipe (usually 1/2" thinwall) and #8 aluminum ground wire (Radio Shack used
to carry it.)  Probably #12 solid bare copper for the driven element so I can solder to it.

Here are some sites for homebrew antennas that might give you some ideas.
I've found the WA5VJD "Cheap Yagi" designs are very easy to build, but aren't
necessarily as durable as the others for a permanent installation.

http://www.wa5vjb.com/yagi-pdf/cheapyagi.pdf
http://www.mydarc.de/dk7zb/
http://www.g0ksc.co.uk/
http://commfaculty.fullerton.edu/woverbeck/quagi.htm
http://www.geocities.jp/jk7tke502/antennas_album.html
http://www.k7mem.150m.com/Electronic_Notebook/antennas/yagi_vhf.html
http://yu1aw.ba-karlsruhe.de/vhf_ant.htm
http://www.yu7ef.com/LowTemperatureAnt.htm


Logged
W0BTU
Member

Posts: 1853


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2012, 10:55:39 AM »


I once had two of those 8-element Quagis phased together, mounted at 70' and 78'. All the elements were scaled up to be resonant about 144.200. Worked great. I used clear (#1, no knots) pine painted with marine spar varnish for the booms and Lexan to support the loops and connectors.
Logged

N8CMQ
Member

Posts: 403




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2012, 02:59:18 PM »

I would use an aluminum construction with a gama match, so the only insulator is in the gama cap and coax connector.
I would also use aluminum and/or stainless hardware. Also, use alox on the aluminum where you have electrical contact.
My ten meter beam, 2 meter beam and 850 MHz beam are all built this way.
The 850 MHz beam has a different feed, as a gama was too small for me to build.
If you want it to last, remember to drill some drain holes for water to escape and plastic caps or wood dowels to plug the tube ends to keep water out, depending on polarity.
The best thing about aluminum and copper, is their ease to work.
Logged

N8CMQ   Jeff
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!