Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Ameritron cost reduction/quality improvement  (Read 7016 times)
WX7G
Member

Posts: 5908




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2012, 07:14:18 AM »

Perhaps it would help if someone from Ameritron paid a visit to the Chinese tube factory.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4328




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2012, 09:51:22 AM »


>If you made quality tubes that had a long service life, you'd eventually put yourself out of business because of the low overall demand.<

Not when the audiophools have been persuaded to change output valves every 300 hours!
Logged
KE5JPP
Member

Posts: 0




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: October 09, 2012, 09:55:19 AM »


>If you made quality tubes that had a long service life, you'd eventually put yourself out of business because of the low overall demand.<

Not when the audiophools have been persuaded to change output valves every 300 hours!

I was talking more along the lines of the 3-500z, 572b and other Amateur amplifier use tubes.  The typical 'audiophools' tubes are somewhat cheaper.

Gene
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 838




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: October 09, 2012, 09:58:24 AM »

the likelihood of another US tube maker losing their shirt is way small.  several years ago, it was trumpeted that TungSol 6L6GCs were going to be remade in the US using old GE equipment.  perhaps 10 were.  perhaps they weren't.  but the latest Antique Electronics catalog shows that the trademark owner is now same as Sovtek, and they are being made in Russian plants.

I can see several reasons why it won't happen (and Westrex is apparently not really in production after moving to Georgia, either.)

(1) equipment is expatriated or broken up.  the web alleges there is still a German manufacturer.

(2) we have too many inspectors and too many hoops to jump through to get a quantity of thorium for filamentary cathodes.  it's fissionable, you know.

(3) there is only one tungsten refractory and wire pulling facility, the old Sylvania mill now owned by Osram.  looked the site up once, a few years ago, and they have limited stock material and much is being discontinued.  that sorta sounds like it's going overseas to some island barely above water.

(4)  we have a thing about a living wage that some disadvantaged countries don't.

(5) the EI plant, essentially Philips' last, went down several years ago in Yugoslavia, and has not reopened.

(6)  all we really have left in the US is CPI/Eimac and Triton.  the old RCA facility, Burle, looks like it's winding down, with the imaging tubes merged up someplace.  And almost all production is ceramic tubes.  The primary ceramic is beryllium, not aluminum, and really the only standing BeO facility there is Brush.  beryllium is much nastier , results similar to plutonium if inhaled.

no, I don't see any more tube fabs.
Logged
WX7G
Member

Posts: 5908




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: October 09, 2012, 11:13:21 AM »

NOS Western Electric 300B tubes became popular for single-ended audio amps and a US company bought the old Western Electric equipment and is producing the tubes.

http://www.westernelectric.com/products/300b.html
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 838




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2012, 01:35:32 PM »

and Westrex is not in production in Georgia or Huntsville, the facility is on the move to Chattanooga with a 2014 target for starting back up again, according to a little web searching among the audio hounds sites.  they're only targeting audiofools.

plenty of NOS around in receiving sizes, some NOS in power sizes, and if you need more than a kilovolt on the plate, it's going to have to be biased to the edge on low EMF to getter it again before you can try it in normal mode.

you are not going to see the same quality and longevity in new production glass tubes, period.  the volume is not there to attract that level of interest.  there is a reason all new amp designs are using ceramics, and it's because they're looking down the road 5,10 years at what is being used commercially and thus staying in production for a while yet.  no Kovar to rust and gas, either.
Logged
WB2WIK
Member

Posts: 20540




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2012, 07:07:04 PM »

This doesn't apply to transmitting tubes, but my best friend in HS was David WB2WND and his Dad worked for RCA in Harrison, NJ...home of a huge receiving tube plant.

They closed that in the 70s and I remember "Dad" saying, "This marks the end of quality receiving tubes; there will never, ever be a plant with the quality controls that we had."

I think he was right.
Logged
WX7G
Member

Posts: 5908




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2012, 05:20:43 AM »

No thorium? But Eimac manufactures thoriated tungsten filament tubes in the U.S. and their Econo division rebuilds such tubes.
Logged
W8JI
Member

Posts: 9304


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2012, 05:44:10 AM »

In the 1980's our leadership declared we no longer needed to be a manufacturing based economy, and could be a service based economy. We also wanted to merge our economy with the world's.

We are now nearing that goal.
Logged
W6UV
Member

Posts: 536




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2012, 08:19:59 AM »

I've been seeing indications that the trend is very slowly starting to reverse itself in certain industries. It'll be a long and painful process to recoup even a small percentage of what we've lost, but the trend is encouraging.

It's happening even faster with services as US companies have started pulling call centers and tech support operations back to this country that was previously outsourced to India.

The ham market is better off than most with regards to manufacturers who still build equipment in the US as there are several companies still doing so: Elecraft, TenTec, MFJ, FlexRadio, etc. This is not true for most mainstream consumer electronic products, such as TVs, cell phones, etc., which are all made in Asia.
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4328




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2012, 10:08:52 AM »

The UK went the same way under Margaret Thatcher. Her idea that a modern country can survive with no manufcaturing industry but on service 'industries' was crazy, to say the least. Not that the later politicians are any better. The mandatory move to digital broadcasting for example. With 150 million FM receivers in the country, even if only one third get replaced at an average import cost of £30, that's £1.5 billion added to trade imbalance - or about 30%. There is no capability of building them in any quantity in the UK.

Engineering is about #24 in popularity at UK universities. Partly because of poor pay and status, but there isn't a realisation at the top of the political tree that without science and engineering, a country is economically sunk.
Logged
KD0REQ
Member

Posts: 838




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: October 10, 2012, 11:49:51 AM »

formerly-RCA, formerly-Burle, is now Photonis, and still lists some 10 power tubes on the website, including the 8122.  there is one nice little pileup-buster that might be useful to the "extra channel" type of guy who has 1600 amps cold-start for the filaments and 20KV for the B++.. pair of these little devils and some water cooling will get you 400 KW in push-pull AM, which ought to be useful on the chicken band...

http://www.photonisusa.com/wp-includes/pdf/4648.pdf

I don't think you could throttle this thing back to limits if you put a dead short on ALL the grids
« Last Edit: October 10, 2012, 12:01:30 PM by KD0REQ » Logged
W8JI
Member

Posts: 9304


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: October 10, 2012, 05:25:05 PM »

The UK went the same way under Margaret Thatcher. Her idea that a modern country can survive with no manufacturing industry but on service 'industries' was crazy, to say the least.

Our lead down that path was Regan.


Quote
Not that the later politicians are any better.


Look at the news over here. We have a company in Massachusetts that was mixing or portioning medicine in a building next to what amounts to a landfill operation. Both in the same compound owned by the same people.

In 2002 or so FDA people noted severe problems, and started a process to regulate these compounding facilities. A group representing compounding facilities donated over a million dollars to politicians in the early 2000's, and the regulations died on the vine.

Now we have people dropping dead and getting ill from a compounding facility that had problems a dozen years ago, but because a group representing them gave politicians in office a million dollars, regulations were never passed. Now we have a massive quantity of sick and dead people.

Quote
The mandatory move to digital broadcasting for example. With 150 million FM receivers in the country, even if only one third get replaced at an average import cost of £30, that's £1.5 billion added to trade imbalance - or about 30%. There is no capability of building them in any quantity in the UK.

We did the same.

Quote
Engineering is about #24 in popularity at UK universities. Partly because of poor pay and status, but there isn't a realisation at the top of the political tree that without science and engineering, a country is economically sunk.

It is about the same here.

73 Tom
Logged
WB6DGN
Member

Posts: 582




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: October 19, 2012, 01:32:31 AM »

Quote
there is one nice little pileup-buster that might be useful to the "extra channel" type of guy who has 1600 amps cold-start for the filaments and 20KV for the B++.. pair of these little devils and some water cooling will get you 400 KW in push-pull AM, which ought to be useful on the chicken band...
http://www.photonisusa.com/wp-includes/pdf/4648.pdf
I don't think you could throttle this thing back to limits if you put a dead short on ALL the grids...

Every so often I see someone drooling over one of these high power broadcast (or whatever) transmitters and I wonder, "do any of these people consider just how they are going to supply power to such a device?"  Call your electric utility some day and tell them you want three phase power delivered to your residence and see what they have to say when, and if, they manage to stop laughing.  Then, tell them the primary VOLTAGE that you require.....
Tom
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!