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Author Topic: PowerPoles  (Read 9068 times)
AE5QB
Member

Posts: 267




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« on: October 09, 2012, 05:22:12 PM »

Crimp Only?
Tin and Crimp?
Solder Only?
Crimp Then Solder?
Solder Then Crimp?
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W9GB
Member

Posts: 2600




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« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2012, 05:34:30 PM »

Tom,

Normally, I just crimp PowerPoles with the PowerwerX TRIcrimp tool.
http://www.powerwerx.com/powerpole-accessories/

IF I am dealing with an UltraFlex stranded wire (high stranded wire count),
 I may touch solder the wire end, to keep the individual strands together.
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KE4VVF
Member

Posts: 61




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« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2012, 06:42:00 PM »

Crimp only.
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KA4POL
Member

Posts: 1921




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« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2012, 09:55:13 PM »

As per asembly instructions the manufacturer recommends crimping.
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KB5ZSM
Member

Posts: 70




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« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 12:02:32 AM »

Crimp!!!  If you solder the connection it will make the wire stiff creating a weakness where the wire will break if bent too often. Also there is a lot of play in the housing between the housing and the terminal and the stiff wires will cause stress possibly causing the terminal to break free from the housing.
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TANAKASAN
Member

Posts: 933




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« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2012, 12:48:40 AM »

I just want to confirm what KB5ZSM said, especially the bit about making the wire fragile after soldering.

Crimp only folks.

Tanakasan
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KA4POL
Member

Posts: 1921




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« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2012, 01:49:26 AM »

Any material does have a certain maximum of bending allowed.
If you take a copper wire and solder it to whatever terminal, applying a bending force will make it bend where it is easiest, most likely at the copper part, unless the material property is changed by soldering which it is most likely not. So breaking will occur at the end of the soldered part.
The same applies to crimping. You also have a rigid part inside the terminal and a softer part thereafter. Breaking usually occurs at the and of the crimped part. Actually when soldering you generate a smoother transition in stranded wire as solder flows between the strands and does not end abruptly.
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AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1236




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« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2012, 04:11:11 AM »

I mostly soldered, until I got an "andy crimp" set from High Sierra.  Crimping is nearly foolproof and works GREAT.  I just ran power leads in my new car this weekend; ran the main wire through the firewall, then put powerpoles on each end with the andycrimp kit.  Fast and easy!
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 5884




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« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2012, 04:16:59 AM »

I would also crimp only, but only by using a good crimping tool.  A solidly crimped mechanical connection is superior in most cases to a soldered connection.
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K3GM
Member

Posts: 1767




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« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2012, 04:22:08 AM »

I only soldered, but recently purchased a "do-it-all" crimping tool, so it's just a matter of installing the correct die for coax connectors or powerpoles.
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KD2CJJ
Member

Posts: 369




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« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2012, 04:48:10 AM »

Which tool?  I've been looking for a decent one.

I only soldered, but recently purchased a "do-it-all" crimping tool, so it's just a matter of installing the correct die for coax connectors or powerpoles.
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73

Mike
KD2CJJ
KA4POL
Member

Posts: 1921




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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2012, 06:45:36 AM »

See: http://www.andersonpower.com/products/application-tooling.html#powerpole
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AC4RD
Member

Posts: 1236




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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2012, 09:12:23 AM »

I only soldered, but recently purchased a "do-it-all" crimping tool, so it's just a matter of installing the correct die for coax connectors or powerpoles.

The "Andy Crimp" set I got from High Sierra has three dies, and it does GREAT for coaxial connectors as well as powerpoles.  I always used to solder them, and I did it badly.   Now that I have learned to use it, the crimper makes a perfect connection every time, with absolutely no fuss.  REALLY nice!
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NR4C
Member

Posts: 306




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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2012, 09:50:54 AM »

My preference, crimp IF YOU HAVE A PROPER, RATCHETING CRIMP TOOL.  If not, then solder carefully.

Also, for very small wire where even the 15 AMP contacts are too large, I solder, and add a bit of hot melt glue into the back of the plastic housing to prevent the wire from flexing at the solder joint.

it takes real finesse to solder wire to a connector and not have solder wick up under the insulation just past the connector.  NASA soldering requirements back a few years (decades) required a small area (about .030 to .050 in) of exposed wire with NO solder visible between the end of the insulation and the end of the connector pin when soldering.  They even supplied a special 'tweezer like' heat sink that had a cup that fit over the insulation and the end of the tweezer clamped around the wire to take away heat and not allow the solder to wick up past the pin.  I wish I could find mine!

...bill nr4c
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KC9NVP
Member

Posts: 65




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« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2012, 05:22:13 PM »

Solder and only the amount needed to keep it from wicking up the wire.   If I ever need to change my setup or make the wire longer, un-solder and insert new wire and solder.

But again, to each their own after finding what works for you.

73, David
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