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Author Topic: PowerPoles  (Read 10036 times)
KB5ZSM
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Posts: 70




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« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2012, 01:08:15 AM »

They even supplied a special 'tweezer like' heat sink that had a cup that fit over the insulation and the end of the tweezer clamped around the wire to take away heat and not allow the solder to wick up past the pin.  I wish I could find mine!

...bill nr4c
Bill - Look up 'Micromart Tools'.   www.micromark.com/

I believe that is where I bought the tweezers you refer to.
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K3GM
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Posts: 1797




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« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2012, 05:11:28 AM »

Which tool?  I've been looking for a decent one.

I only soldered, but recently purchased a "do-it-all" crimping tool, so it's just a matter of installing the correct die for coax connectors or powerpoles.

Quicksliver's
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KG6AF
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Posts: 355




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« Reply #17 on: October 11, 2012, 08:58:34 AM »

I'm going to get an Andy Crimp (available from Quicksilver or High Sierra), but I've got to admit that the soldering tweezers look kind of neat:

http://www.micromark.com/heat-sink-soldering-tweezer,7064.html
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3828




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« Reply #18 on: October 11, 2012, 09:25:16 AM »

Being a dyed in the wool cheapskate, I looked for an alternative to the typical $50 crimper for Power Poles.

I found a crimper that electricans use for crimp terminals at an electrical supply store.  They cost around $25 vs. $50.

No solder.

(As an aside:  The instructions and information on the box of electrical terminals used in industry says that the use of a crimped terminal turns the wire and terminal into a homogeneous mass.)

ho·mo·ge·ne·ous (h½”m…-j¶“n¶-…s, -j¶n“y…s) adj. 1. Of the same or similar nature or kind. 2. Uniform in structure or composition throughout.

No need for solder.  Never heard of a terminal failure in 40 years.   
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N6AJR
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Posts: 9908




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« Reply #19 on: October 11, 2012, 09:28:35 AM »

I tried the little $9 crimpers and  they did not work.  The red  ratcheting crimper from either High Sierra or West Mountain Radio work just fine, at $39 to $50 or get the "real" ones from Anderson at $150.

 I have them on all of my stuff. in the shack the truck, the car and in the garage.  If you need to make them semi permanent, a small zip tie through the holes will hold them together.

 The correct way to assemble them for use with commercial stuff is red right tang top.

Yes I only crimp, using the ratcheting crimpers. I probably have several hundred sets in use, no problems, ever
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KB3HG
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Posts: 404




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« Reply #20 on: October 11, 2012, 09:56:45 AM »

One could put a miniscule amount of solder on the wire, to wick it would prevent the crimping tool to really get the desired crimp shape and the force might just split the connector . Solder does not compress so well.  too much will create a stress point on the wire and it usually breaks at the most inopportune time. High Serra has a U Tube video next to their crimper from the ARRL. Now I watched it for the first time yesterday, He used the 75 amp connectors. It seemed to me he was holding the crimper upside down.  I'll have to check out Andersons crimper.
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K1CJS
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Posts: 6034




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« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2012, 04:06:05 AM »

I got two sets of crimping 'pliers' from Radio Shack back when they still had semi-decent tools--black anodized steel with red plastic handles.  Those cost about $10 each and were made for any crimp-on type wire terminal.  With proper care, they will work on the wing type crimp on powerpole terminals.  The only thing you've got to do is to make sure the terminals are straight when you finish, because the crimper will bend them when it's closing down on them. 

For the heavier round type powerpole terminal, those crimpers will not work as well.  As with anything, you've got to take the time and the proper care to line things up and make sure the crimpers are centered on the terminal.  If you don't do that, there isn't a crimping tool in the world that will do the job right.

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KC9NVP
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Posts: 69




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« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2012, 05:54:20 AM »

No need for solder.  Never heard of a terminal failure in 40 years.  

Glad to hear that you have not had one fail in 40 years, but in my line of work, aircraft electrical systems control and generation, I have seen many a  crimp and solder terminals fail, even in automotive applications in those 30 - 35 years.  The failures generally break down to two or three issues, incorrect prep of the wiring, too much solder or too little, and improper crimping by using too big a crimper die or one that flatens the terminal.

Too much solder results in wicking of the solder up the wire which does not allow the wire to flex.  Improper crimp or too little solder results in a high resistive connection that can over heat.

Which ever method you select - crimp or solder, learn to do it correctly, you should be ok.

73, David
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KB1GMX
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Posts: 770




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« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2012, 07:19:29 AM »

I solder them.

The added item is that I use some heavy wall 1" two layer heat shrink tubing (has hot melt glue inside).
This strain relieves the wire well well past the solder zone and also protects the back of the connector.

I been using P-poles for 10 years and no failures yet done that way and most are mobile/portable
use but the whole station uses them as I run solar/battery power.


Allison
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AJ4WC
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Posts: 47




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« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2012, 09:35:37 AM »

I only solder when I'm working with small wire so the wire doesn't pull out of the back of the shell.  It's typically only 18 AWG and smaller that tend to pull out.  I don't solder the larger wires at all since the pins have more bite.  If you get all three size of pins, 15/30/45 Amp, and select the proper pin for the wire gauge, then almost no soldering is necessary.  

When I first started using PP, I hated them.  They really are not very good connectors.  But, I like the Rigrunners, the flexibility and standardization.  I have them on everything now.  With the crimp tool, 4 Rigrunners, and all the connectors I've purchased, I have well over $300 invested in just these dumb things, so they're not cheap.  However, my bench wiring is clean and neat and moving equipment around is much easier.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 09:41:20 AM by AJ4WC » Logged
KB1NXE
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Posts: 310




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« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2012, 08:32:33 PM »

30 Amp - Solder.  You can always unsolder!  You can't uncrimp.

45 and up - Crimp.  I use the Tri-Crimp tool from  Power-Werx
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N4CR
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Posts: 1666




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« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2012, 09:47:43 PM »

I crimp. I use the Gardner Bender GS-88. I don't see these for sale anywhere. It looks like the GS-388 is the new replacement for the GS-88.
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73 de N4CR, Phil

We are Coulomb of Borg. Resistance is futile. Voltage, on the other hand, has potential.
AE5JU
Member

Posts: 229




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« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2012, 09:41:41 AM »

http://k9zw.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/   Everything you need to know about Powerpoles.

I used to solder but now I crimp only.  I use a Klein 1005 crimper, placing the dimple on the side of the tang opposite the seam.

There is a similar $13 crimper on the Powerwerx site.

Paul - AE5JU
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N4NYY
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Posts: 4758




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« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2012, 12:38:14 PM »

I started working part time at HRO, and had never heard of these things, until my co-workers pointed them out. I know have to go and try them.
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AE5JU
Member

Posts: 229




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« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2012, 09:47:52 PM »

http://k9zw.wordpress.com/2009/08/12/   Everything you need to know about Powerpoles.

I used to solder but now I crimp only.  I use a Klein 1005 crimper, placing the dimple on the side of the tang opposite the seam.

There is a similar $13 crimper on the Powerwerx site.

Paul - AE5JU

This crimper is a copy of the Klein 1005 I use, which works just fine for the 15 and 30 amp Powerpoles.

http://www.powerwerx.com/crimping-tools/powerpole-crimping-tool-15-30-amp.html

I also use Powerpoles for antenna connections with portable / emergency antennas.  They come in colors other than just red and black.  I use red, black, blue, and yellow for my AE5JU Field Day Antenna at Hamuniverse.com.  Snap hooks take the actual stain, with the Powerpoles making the electrical connection. 

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a384/PaulCoats/10FieldDayAntNewConnectionColorCode.jpg

Here's a photo of a OCFD ("Windom") with interchangeable legs.

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a384/PaulCoats/01BalunConnection1.jpg

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a384/PaulCoats/04Windom80Meters.jpg

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a384/PaulCoats/03Windom40Meters.jpg

Of course, this is for portable / emergency use only.  I would make more solid connection for a permanent antenna installation.

So, Powerpoles are not just for power connections.

Paul - AE5JU
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